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Encyclopedia > Big Country
Big Country
Background information
Origin Scotland
Genre(s) Rock, New Wave, Heavy metal
Years active 1981–2000, 2007
Label(s) Phonogram Records
Track-BCR Records
Members
Bruce Watson
Tony Butler
Mark Brzezicki
Former members
Stuart Adamson (deceased)

Big Country was a rock band from Dunfermline, Scotland, popular in the early to mid-1980s but still are releasing material for a cult following since 2004. The band was notable for music heavily accented with traditional Scottish folk and martial music styles, as well as for playing and engineering their guitar sound to resemble the bagpipes, fiddles and other traditional folk instruments. This article is about the country. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Phonogram Records was started in 1962 as a joint venture between Philips Records and Deutsche Grammophon. ... Bruce Watson (born Bruce William Watson, 11 March 1961, Timmins, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian guitarist most famous for being a founding member of the Scottish based rock band, Big Country. ... Tony Butler (born Anthony Earle Peter Butler, on February 13, 1957, in Shepherds Bush, London, England), is a rock bass player, best known for his lengthy work with the Scottish rock band, Big Country. ... Mark Brzezicki (born Mark Michael Brzezicki on 21 June 1957 in Slough, Berkshire, UK) is a rock drummer who is primarily known for his work with Big Country and is currently a member of Procol Harum. ... Stuart Adamson (born William Stuart Adamson, 11 April 1958 – December 16, 2001), was an English-born Scottish Musician (Guitars / Vocals / Keyboards / Songwriter). ... The Big Country may refer to: Big Country, a rock band from Dunfermline, Scotland popular in the early to mid 1980s The Big Country, a 1958 American movie, based on a novel by Donald Hamilton, starring Gregory Peck, Jean Simmons and Carroll Baker The Big Country, a song by Talking... Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90s. ... In music, a band is a company of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of or improvising a musical arrangement on different musical instruments. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... This article is about the country. ... This article does not discuss cult in its original meaning. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ...

Contents

Career

Composed of Stuart Adamson (formerly of The Skids, vocals / guitar / keyboards), Bruce Watson (guitar / vocals), Tony Butler (bass guitar / vocals) and Mark Brzezicki (drums / percussion / vocals) though a variety of other drummers have been in the band their long career, including Simon Phillips. Pete Wishart who joined Runrig and became prominent in the SNP, was in an early version of the band -- the same incarnation that supported Alice Cooper and got thrown off the tour for being "too weird". Although the band's music drew from Scottish traditional music, none of its members were born in Scotland. Adamson grew up in Dunfermline, and as such, his trademark Scottish accent was genuine. Stuart Adamson (born William Stuart Adamson, 11 April 1958 – December 16, 2001), was an English-born Scottish Musician (Guitars / Vocals / Keyboards / Songwriter). ... The Skids The Skids were an art-punk/punk rock and new wave band from Dunfermline, Scotland, founded in 1977 by Stuart Adamson (1958 - 2001, guitars / vocals / keyboards), Richard Jobson (vocals / guitar), Thomas Kellichan (drums) and William Simpson (bass guitar / vocals). ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... Bruce Watson (born Bruce William Watson, 11 March 1961, Timmins, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian guitarist most famous for being a founding member of the Scottish based rock band, Big Country. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A backing vocalist or backing singer (or, especially in the U.S., backup singer or sometimes background singer) is a singer who sings in harmony with the lead vocalist, other backing vocalists, or alone but not singing the lead. ... Tony Butler (born Anthony Earle Peter Butler, on February 13, 1957, in Shepherds Bush, London, England), is a rock bass player, best known for his lengthy work with the Scottish rock band, Big Country. ... The electric bass guitar (or electric bass) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers by plucking, slapping, popping or using a pick. ... A backing vocalist or backing singer (or, especially in the U.S., backup singer or sometimes background singer) is a singer who sings in harmony with the lead vocalist, other backing vocalists, or alone but not singing the lead. ... Mark Brzezicki (born Mark Michael Brzezicki on 21 June 1957 in Slough, Berkshire, UK) is a rock drummer who is primarily known for his work with Big Country and is currently a member of Procol Harum. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set - the latter an old-fashioned term) is a collection of drums, cymbals and other percussion instruments arranged for convenient playing by a sole percussionist (drummer), usually for jazz, rock, or other types of contemporary music. ... “Percussion” redirects here. ... A backing vocalist or backing singer (or, especially in the U.S., backup singer or sometimes background singer) is a singer who sings in harmony with the lead vocalist, other backing vocalists, or alone but not singing the lead. ... Categories: Stub | 1962 births | British MPs ... Runrig playing live link title Runrig are a Scottish folk rock band founded by brothers Rory and Calum MacDonald and their friend Blair Douglas in 1973 in the rural Western Isles of Scotland. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... Alice Cooper (born February 4, 1948) is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans four decades. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...


Albums

The Crossing

Formed initially as a five piece band in 1981, their first single was "Harvest Home", recorded and released in 1982. It was a modest success, reaching #91 on the UK Singles Chart. Their next single was 1983's "Fields of Fire", which reached the UK's Top Ten and was rapidly followed by the album The Crossing. The album was a hit in the United States, powered by "In a Big Country", their only U.S. Top 40 hit single. The song featured heavily engineered guitar playing, strongly reminiscent of bagpipes; Adamson and fellow guitarist, Watson, achieved this through the use of the MXR Pitch Transposer 129 Guitar Effect. Also contributing to the band's unique sound was their early virtuoso use of the e-bow, a device which allows a guitar to sound more like strings or synthesizer. The Crossing sold over a million copies in the UK and obtained gold record status (sales of over 500,000) in the U.S. The band also performed on both the Grammys and Saturday Night Live. A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Harvest Home is: A song recorded and released by Big Country in 1982. ... “Sound recorder” redirects here. ... “British Hit Singles” redirects here. ... A top 10 list is a generic term used to indicate a list of items, usually ten in number, which are considered to be best, worst, or notable in some other way, typically a record chart. ... The Crossing is the first studio album released by Scottish band Big Country in 1983. ... In A Big Country is one of the most famous and well-known songs by the rock band Big Country. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... In popular music, a chart-topper is an extremely popular recording, identified by its inclusion in a ranked list—a chart—of top selling or otherwise judged most popular releases. ... For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... An EBow The EBow or ebow (brand name or E-bow, for Electronic bow or Energy Bow)[1] is a hand-held, battery-powered electronic device for playing the electric guitar. ... “Golden record” redirects here. ...


Wonderland

The band released the non-LP extended play single Wonderland in 1984 while undergoing a lengthy worldwide tour. The song, considered by some critics to be one of their finest, [1][2] was a Top Ten hit (#8) in the UK singles chart but despite heavy airplay and a positive critical response, was a comparative flop in the U.S., only reaching #86 on the Billboard Hot 100. It was the last single by the band to make a U.S. chart appearance. // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... A top 10 list is a generic term used to indicate a list of items, usually ten in number, which are considered to be best, worst, or notable in some other way, typically a record chart. ... Airplay is a technical term used in the radio industry to state how frequently a song is being played on a radio station. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... // A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ...


Steeltown

Their second album Steeltown (1984) was a hit as soon as it was released, entering the UK Albums Chart at Number one. The album featured three UK Top 40 hit singles, and received considerable critical acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic, but like Wonderland (and, in fact, all subsequent releases) it was a commercial disappointment in the U.S, peaking at #70 on the Billboard album charts.[3] Steeltown is the second studio album by Scottish band Big Country, released in 1984. ... The UK Albums Chart is a chart of the sales positions of albums in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of the number one hits in the UK Singles Chart, from its inception in 1952 to the present. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ...


Throughout 1984 and 1985, the band toured the UK, Europe, and, to a lesser extent, the U.S., both as headliners themselves and in support of such artists as Queen and Roger Daltrey. They also recorded prolifically, and provided the musical score to a Scottish independent film, 'Restless Natives' (1985), which was not released on CD until years later on the band's Restless Natives and Rarities (1998) collection. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, singer Freddie Mercury and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Roger Harry Daltrey, CBE (born 1 March 1944) is a rock vocalist, songwriter, and actor, best known as the founder and lead singer of English rock band The Who. ... Sheet music is written represenation of music. ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ... Restless Natives (1985) is a comedy film directed by Michael Hoffman and starring Vincent Friell, Joe Mullaney, and Ned Beatty. ... A compact disc or CD is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ...


The Seer

1986's The Seer, the band's third album, was another big success in the UK, peaking at Number 2, and producing three additional Top 40 UK singles. These included "Look Away" which reached Number 7 (the band's highest charting UK single). Kate Bush provided backing vocals on the title cut, and, as was the norm for the band at the time, the album received good reviews from the music press. In the U.S., the album sold modestly better than Steeltown, reaching #59 on the Billboard album charts.[4] The Seer is the third studio album by Scottish band Big Country, released in 1986. ... Kate Bush (born 30 July 1958) is an English singer, songwriter, musician and record producer. ... A backing vocalist or backing singer (or, especially in the U.S., backup singer or sometimes background singer) is a singer who sings in harmony with the lead vocalist, other backing vocalists, or alone but not singing the lead. ...


This album showed the band's loyalty to Scottish Nationalist themes, with "The Seer" being about a woman who tells a traveller about the tyranny of William of Orange upon the Jacobites movement coming to an end soon; while "The Red Fox" was based on Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson, and the so called Appin Murder of Colin Campbel, a Tory who was hated by many in Scotland around 1752.[citation needed] Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution 1830. ... William of Orange (French: Guillaume, Dutch: Willem) is the name of several historical people. ... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Peace in Our Time

In what some critics felt was an apparent attempt to regain their dwindling U.S. following,[5] Big Country hooked up with producer Peter Wolf [6] for their next album, Peace in Our Time (1988), which was recorded in Los Angeles, California. The result was very different from the previous singles and albums, and, in "Broken Heart (13 Valleys)" contained the song which Stuart Adamson claimed to be his favourite of all time. Despite this it was not well received by most critics and fans. One reviewer noted that it was the group's "least representative and least interesting album."[7] It sold poorly.[8] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chamberlain holding the paper containing the resolution to commit to peaceful methods signed by both Hitler and himself on his return from Germany in September 1938. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... For more information on fans of football (soccer), see Football (soccer) culture. ...


The Buffalo Skinners

In 1991, the band was dropped by Phonogram, the label that had released all of their material for ten years. After that, Big Country became a minor act, popping up in the lower echelons of the charts in the UK and Europe with the release of every subsequent album. Only one of these, 1993's The Buffalo Skinners, received a major label release (via Chrysalis Records); it seemed a return to form of sorts for the band, and obtained a surprisingly enthusiastic critical response. But its sales were meagre and, in retrospect, it can be seen as Big Country's last, lost chance to regain a mass audience. Regardless, the band retained an intensely devoted cult following, as evidenced by their deceptively large post-1990 discography, which consists mostly of live concert recordings and singles/rarities collections. Manufacturers put records inside protective and decorative cardboard jackets and an inner paper sleeve to protect the grooves from dust and scratches. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... The Buffalo Skinners is the sixth studio album by the Scottish band Big Country, released in 1993. ... The following is a partial list of record labels, both past and present. ... Chrysalis logo (1987-2005) Chrysalis Records is a record label that was created in 1969. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A concert is a live performance, usually of music, before an audience. ...


Why the Long Face?

Throughout the 1990s, Big Country became a popular 'opening act', supporting such bands as Rolling Stones and The Who; Roger Daltrey reportedly uttered on numerous occasions that he'd 'love to steal their rhythm section!'. (In fact, Big Country had backed Daltrey on his 1985 solo album Under The Raging Moon, and Tony Butler played bass and backing vocals on Pete Townshend's 1980 hit single "Let My Love Open The Door". Both Butler and Brzezicki performed on Townshend's 1985 solo album White City: A Novel. This article is about the rock band. ... The Who are an English rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Roger Harry Daltrey, CBE (born 1 March 1944) is a rock vocalist, songwriter, and actor, best known as the founder and lead singer of English rock band The Who. ... Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend (born May 19, 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, and composer. ... White City: A Novel is a solo album by Pete Townshend of The Who. ...


Of growing concern, however, was the mental and emotional health of lead singer Adamson, who reportedly had struggled with alcoholism for several years. Adamson split with his first wife, who later spoke to Scottish and English tabloids about his heavy drinking. He moved to Nashville, in the mid 1990s, where he took up residence and married a hairdresser. While in Nashville, he met noted artist Marcus Hummon and released an acclaimed studio album with him, under the moniker The Raphaels. Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A tabloid is a newspaper — especially in the United Kingdom — that uses the tabloid format, which is roughly 23½ by 14¾ inches per spread. ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... A hairdresser is someone WHO IS EXTREMELY GAY LIKE NEIL AND HIS DREAM JOB IS TO BE A HAIRDRESSSER whose occupation is to cut or style hair, in order to change or maintain a persons image as they desire. ...


In 1995 Big Country released another album Why the Long Face?. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Driving to Damascus

1999 saw the release of Big Country's eighth and final studio album, Driving to Damascus (titled in its slightly different, augmented U.S. release John Wayne's Dream). Adamson said publicly that he was disappointed that the album did not fare better on the charts, which led to depression. Later that year, he disappeared for a while before resurfacing, stating that he had just needed some time off.


The final days

Adamson returned for the band's 'Final Fling' farewell tour, culminating in a sold-out concert at Glasgow's Barrowland Ballroom on 29 May 2000. Although that marked the end of Big Country as a touring band, they were always adamant that they would appear together again. They played what turned out to be their last gig in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in October that year. For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Barrowland Ballroom The Barrowlands (more properly The Barrowland Ballroom) is a major dance hall and concert venue in Glasgow, Scotland. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Maju dan makmur (English: Progress and Prosper) Location in Malaysia Coordinates: , Country State Establishment 1857 Granted city status 1974 Government  - Mayor (Datuk Bandar) Datuk Abdul Hakim Borhan From 14 December 2006 Area  - City 243. ...


In November 2001, Adamson disappeared again. Numerous appeals were put on the Big Country website asking for Adamson to call home and speak to anyone in the band, the management company, or his ex-wife. The website also requested that any fans who might have been 'harbouring' the singer to contact the management company and alert them to his whereabouts. Brzezicki and Butler had indicated they were concerned but the reason Big Country had lasted so long was they stayed out of one another's personal lives, and both later noted they were unaware of the extent of Adamson's problems. He was found dead in a room at the Best Western Plaza Hotel in Honolulu, Hawaii on December 16, 2001. The official autopsy revealed that he had hanged himself.[9] [10] [11] Honolulu as seen from the International Space Station Honolulu is the largest city and the capital of the U.S. state of Hawai‘i. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Post-mortem, postmortem and post mortem redirect here. ...


A memorial to Adamson was held at Dunfermline’s Carnegie Hall in January 2002, followed by a tribute concert at the Barrowlands in May. It brought together the remaining members of both Big Country and The Skids; Adamson's teenage children, Callum and Kirsten; as well as Steve Harley, Runrig, Simon Townshend, Midge Ure and Bill Nelson. The Skids The Skids were an art-punk/punk rock and new wave band from Dunfermline, Scotland, founded in 1977 by Stuart Adamson (1958 - 2001, guitars / vocals / keyboards), Richard Jobson (vocals / guitar), Thomas Kellichan (drums) and William Simpson (bass guitar / vocals). ... Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel were a UK rock band from the early 1970s. ... Runrig playing live link title Runrig are a Scottish folk rock band founded by brothers Rory and Calum MacDonald and their friend Blair Douglas in 1973 in the rural Western Isles of Scotland. ... Simon Townshend is a British guitarist, singer and songwriter. ... Midge Ure OBE (born James Ure on October 10, 1953 in Cambuslang, Lanarkshire, Scotland) is a rock and roll guitarist, singer, and songwriter from Scotland, who had particular success in the 1970s and 1980s. ... Bill Nelson (born William Nelson on 18 December 1948) is a prolific guitarist, songwriter, painter and experimental musician from Wakefield, Yorkshire, England, UK. He currently lives in Selby, Yorkshire, England, UK. // Nelson was educated at the Wakefield College of Art, where he developed an interest in the work of poet...


A new beginning

In 2007, to celebrate 25 years of Big Country, founder members Bruce Watson, Tony Butler (now lead vocalist for the first time), and Mark Brzezicki have reunited to embark on a tour of the UK with dates in Scotland and England. Bruce Watson (born Bruce William Watson, 11 March 1961, Timmins, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian guitarist most famous for being a founding member of the Scottish based rock band, Big Country. ... Tony Butler (born Anthony Earle Peter Butler, on February 13, 1957, in Shepherds Bush, London, England), is a rock bass player, best known for his lengthy work with the Scottish rock band, Big Country. ... Mark Brzezicki (born Mark Michael Brzezicki on 21 June 1957 in Slough, Berkshire, UK) is a rock drummer who is primarily known for his work with Big Country and is currently a member of Procol Harum. ...


Twenty Five Live

http://www.bigcountry.co.uk/media/00000103.jpg


Twenty Five Live was recorded at the Bristol Thekla on 18 August 2007.


Tracklisting - "Driving To Damascus", "Look Away", "The Teacher", "Fragile Thing", "Wonderland", "Alone", "Restless Natives", "Fields Of Fire", "You Lift Me Up", "Chance", "In A Big Country".


They are also rumoured to be going into the studio to record a new album.


Discography

For more details about the discography, see Big Country discography. The Crossing (1983) Wonderland (EP) (1984) Steeltown (1984) The Seer (1986) Peace in Our Time (1988) No Place Like Home (1991) The Buffalo Skinners (1993) Without the Aid of a Safety Net (live) (1994) Radio 1 Sessions (live) (1994) Why the Long Face? (1995) BBC Live in Concert (1995) Eclectic...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Big Country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1340 words)
Big Country was a rock band from Dunfermline, Scotland, popular in the early to mid 1980s, but still releasing material for a cult following as recently as 2004.
Throughout the 90's, Big Country became a popular 'opening act', supporting such bands as Rolling Stones and The Who; Roger Daltrey reportedly uttered on numerous occasions that he'd 'love to steal their rhythm section!'.
Numerous appeals were put on the Big Country website asking for 1/ Stuart to call home and speak to anyone in the band, the management company or his ex wife.
Big Country Timeline (4515 words)
January 23: Big Country performs at the Hammersmith Odeon in London (this is later released as BBC Live In Concert in 1995).
December 29: Big Country performs at the Barrowlands in Glasgow, Scotland (this is released as Without the Aid of a Safety Net in 1994).
Big Country appear at HMV in Edinburgh, Scotland at 4:30 p.m.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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