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Encyclopedia > Betty Ford
Elizabeth "Betty" Ford

Betty Ford in her official White House photograph, 1974.
Born April 8, 1900 (1900-04-08) (age 107)
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Occupation Former First Lady of the United States
Predecessor Pat Nixon
Successor Rosalynn Carter
Spouse (1) William G. Warren (married 1942, divorced 1947)
( 2) Gerald R. Ford (married 1948, died 2006)
Children Michael, Jack, Steven, Susan
Betty Ford's official White House portrait, painted in 1977 by Felix de Cossio
Betty Ford's official White House portrait, painted in 1977 by Felix de Cossio

Elizabeth Anne Bloomer Warren Ford (born April 8, 1918) is the widow of former United States President Gerald R. Ford and was the First Lady from 1974 to 1977. She is the founder and former chairman of the board of directors of the Betty Ford Center for substance abuse and addiction. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (961x1324, 146 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Betty Ford Category: ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Thelma Catherine Ryan Nixon (March 16, 1912 – June 22, 1993) was the wife of former President Richard Nixon and the First Lady of the United States of America from 1969 to 1974. ... Eleanor Rosalynn Smith Carter (born August 18, 1927) is the wife of former President Jimmy Carter and was First Lady of the United States from 1977 to 1981. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Michael Ford may be: Michael Curtis Ford, American historical novelist Michael Gerald Ford (b. ... John Jack Gardner Ford (born March 16, 1952) is the second child and second son of U.S. President Gerald Ford and First Lady Betty Ford. ... Steven Meigs Ford (born May 19, 1956) is an American actor. ... Susan Ford Vance Bales (born July 6, 1957 in Washington, D.C.) is an American author, photojournalist, and drug addiction and cancer awareness advocate. ... public domain image from whitehouse. ... public domain image from whitehouse. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The Betty Ford Center is a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center in Rancho Mirage, California co-founded by former United States First Lady Betty Ford and her friend, Ambassador Leonard Firestone, in 1982. ...

Contents

Early life

Born in Chicago as Elizabeth Anne Bloomer and known from childhood as Betty, she was the third child and only daughter of William Stephenson Bloomer, Sr., a travelling salesman for Royal Rubber Co., and his wife, the former Hortense Neahr. She had two older brothers, Robert and William, Jr., and after living briefly in Denver, she grew up in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where she graduated from Central High School. This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... Nickname: Location of Grand Rapids within Kent County, Michigan Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Kent Founded 1826 Incorporation (city) 1850 Government  - Mayor George Heartwell Area  - City  45. ...


After the 1929 stock market crash, when Betty Bloomer was eleven, she began modeling clothes and teaching other children dances such as the foxtrot, waltz, and big apple. She studied dance at the Calla Travis Dance Studio, graduating in 1935. Crowd gathering on Wall Street. ... Photograph of the once famous model Dovima A model is a person who poses or displays for purposes of art, fashion, or other products and advertising. ... This article is about the dance. ... A waltz (German: , Italian: , French: , Catalan: ) is a ballroom and folk dance in   time, done primarily in closed position. ... The Big Apple is both partner dance and line dance originated in the Afro-American community of the United States of the beginning of the 20th century. ... jus like my ass For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ...


When Bloomer was sixteen, her father, an alcoholic, died by carbon monoxide poisoning, reportedly while working on the family car in the Bloomers' garage; whether it was an accident or suicide remains unknown.[1] In 1933, after she graduated from high school, she proposed continuing her study of dance in New York, but her mother refused. Instead, Bloomer attended the Bennington School of Dance in Bennington, Vermont, for two summers, where she studied under Martha Graham and Hanya Holm. Carbon monoxide poisoning occurs after the inhalation of carbon monoxide gas. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... The American Dance Festival is a six-week summer season of modern dance performances, and a school for dance currently held at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... Bennington (town), Vermont Old Bennington, Vermont Bennington County, Vermont North Bennington, Vermont Bennington (CDP), Vermont This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Martha Graham and Bertram Ross in Visionary Recital, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1961 Martha Graham (May 11, 1894 – April 1, 1991), an American dancer and choreographer, is known as one of the foremost pioneers of modern dance. ... Hanya Holm (1893 – 1992) dancer, choreographer and teacher Holm was one of the pioneers of modern dance. ...


Career

After being accepted by Graham as a student, Betty Bloomer moved to Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood and worked as a fashion model for the John Robert Powers firm in order to finance her dance studies. She joined Graham’s auxiliary troupe and eventually performed with the company at Carnegie Hall. Manhattan is a borough of New York City, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... Chelsea is located on the West Side of Manhattan, New York City. ... John Robert Powers (April 16, 1892 - November, 1977) was an American actor and founder of a prominent New York City modelling agency. ... Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ...


Her mother, now remarried to Arthur Meigs Godwin, opposed her daughter’s choice of a career and insisted that she move home, but Bloomer resisted. They finally came to a compromise: she would return home for six months, and if nothing worked out for her in New York, she would return to Michigan, which she did in 1941. She became the fashion coordinator for Herpolsheimer's, a local department store. She also organized her own dance group and taught dance at various sites in Grand Rapids, including to children with disabilities. Fashion illustration by George Barbier of a gown by Jeanne Paquin, 1912, from La Gazette du bon ton, the most influential fashion magazine of its era. ... The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... Disabilities are limitations in activity and/or functioning that are attributable to permanent medical conditions in physical, mental, emotional, and/or sensory domains and, significantly, are also due to societal responses to those limitations. ...


Marriages and family

In 1942, Bloomer married William G. Warren, a furniture salesman, whom she had known since she was twelve. She and her husband, who soon began selling insurance, moved frequently because of his work. At one point they lived in Toledo, Ohio, where she was employed as a demonstrator at Lasalle & Koch, a department store, a job that entailed being a model and saleswoman. They had no children and divorced on September 22 , 1947, on the grounds of incompatibility. Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Coordinates: Country United States State Ohio County Lucas Founded 1833 Government  - Mayor Carty Finkbeiner (D) Area  - City 84. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ...


On October 15, 1948, Elizabeth Bloomer Warren married Gerald R. Ford Jr., a lawyer and World War II veteran, at Grace Episcopal Church, in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Ford was then campaigning for what would be his first of thirteen terms as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and the wedding was delayed until shortly before the elections, because, as The New York Times reported, "Jerry was running for Congress and wasn't sure how voters might feel about his marrying a divorced ex-dancer."[2] October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... The arms of the Episcopal Church are based on the St Georges Cross, a symbol of England (mother of world Anglicanism), with a saltire reminiscent of the Cross of St Andrew in the canton in reference to the historical origins of the American episcopate in the Scottish Episcopal Church. ... Nickname: Location of Grand Rapids within Kent County, Michigan Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Kent Founded 1826 Incorporation (city) 1850 Government  - Mayor George Heartwell Area  - City  45. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...

First family, 1974

The couple, who were married for 58 years, had four children: Image File history File links Ford_gerald_family1974. ... Image File history File links Ford_gerald_family1974. ...

The Fords moved to the Virginia suburbs of the Washington, D.C., area and lived there for twenty-five years. Ford rose to become the highest-ranking Republican in the House, then was appointed Vice President when Spiro Agnew resigned from that position in 1973. He became president in 1974, upon Richard M. Nixon's resignation in the wake of the Watergate scandal. Michael Ford in 2007 Michael Gerald Ford (b. ... John Jack Gardner Ford (born March 16, 1952) is the second child and second son of U.S. President Gerald Ford and First Lady Betty Ford. ... Steven Meigs Ford (born May 19, 1956) is an American actor. ... Susan Ford Vance Bales (born July 6, 1957 in Washington, D.C.) is an American author, photojournalist, and drug addiction and cancer awareness advocate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the 39th Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the 55th Governor of Maryland. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The Watergate building. ...


First Lady of the United States

Vice President Gerald Ford is sworn in as the 38th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger as Betty Ford looks on.
Vice President Gerald Ford is sworn in as the 38th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger as Betty Ford looks on.

In the opinion of The New York Times, "Mrs. Ford's impact on American culture may be far wider and more lasting than that of her husband, who served a mere 896 days, much of it spent trying to restore the dignity of the office of the president." The paper went on to describe her as "a product and symbol of the cultural and political times—doing the Bump along the corridors of the White House, donning a mood ring, chatting on her CB radio with the handle First Mama—a housewife who argued passionately for equal rights for women, a mother of four who mused about drugs, abortion and premarital sex aloud and without regret."[3] In 1975, in an interview with McCall's magazine, Ford said that she was asked just about everything, except for how often she and the president had sex. "And if they'd asked me that I would have told them," she said, adding that her response would be, "As often as possible."[4] Caption: Gerald R. Ford is sworn in as the 38th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger as Mrs. ... Caption: Gerald R. Ford is sworn in as the 38th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger as Mrs. ... this guy is awsome i played him in a school play he also has some pretty funky history Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Warren Burger at a press conference in May 1969 shortly after he was nominated to be Chief Justice of the United States. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... The bump was a primarily 1970s fad dance wherein the main move of the dance is to lightly bump hips on every other main beat of the music. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Citizens band radio (CB) is, in the United States, a system of short distance radio communication between individuals on a selection of 40 channels within the single 27 MHz (11 meter) band. ... Cover of the March 1911 issue McCalls was a monthly American womens magazine that enjoyed great popularity through much of the 20th century, peaking at a readership of six million in 1960. ...


She was open about the benefits of psychiatric treatment, she spoke understandingly about marijuana use and premarital sex, and the new First Lady pointedly stated that she and the President shared the same bed during a televised White House tour. After Betty Ford appeared on 60 Minutes in a characteristically candid interview in which she discussed how she would counsel her daughter if she was having an affair and the possibility that her children may have experimented with marijuana, some conservatives called her "No Lady" and even demanded her "resignation", but her overall approval rating was at 75%. As she later said, during her husband's failed 1976 presidential campaign, "I would give my life to have Jerry have my poll numbers".[5] Psychotherapy is a set of techniques believed to cure or to help solve behavioral and other psychological problems in humans. ... A Cannabis sativa plant The drug cannabis, also called marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ... This article is primarily about religious attitudes to sexual morality. ... 60 Minutes is an investigative television newsmagazine on United States television, which has run on CBS News since 1968. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ...


During her time as First Lady, Ford also was an outspoken advocate of women's rights. She supported the proposed Equal Rights Amendment and the legalization of abortion. For a time, it was unclear whether Gerald Ford shared his wife's pro-choice viewpoint. However, he told interviewer Larry King that he, too, was pro-choice and had been criticized for that stance by conservative forces within the Republican Party. The term women’s rights typically refers to freedoms inherently possessed by women and girls of all ages, which may be institutionalized or ignored and/or illegitimately suppressed by law or custom in a particular society. ... The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution that was intended to guarantee equal rights under the law for Americans regardless of sex. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Larry King (born Lawrence Harvey Zeiger on November 19, 1933) is an award-winning American broadcaster. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...

The Fords in a limo, 1974.

Weeks after Betty Ford became First Lady, she underwent a mastectomy for breast cancer on September 28, 1974. Her openness about her illness raised the visibility of a disease that Americans had previously been reluctant to talk about. "When other women have this same operation, it doesn't make any headlines," she told Time magazine. "But the fact that I was the wife of the President put it in headlines and brought before the public this particular experience I was going through. It made a lot of women realize that it could happen to them. I'm sure I've saved at least one person—maybe more." Further amplifying the public awareness of breast cancer were reports that several weeks after Betty Ford's cancer surgery, Happy Rockefeller, the wife of vice president Nelson Rockefeller, also underwent a mastectomy.[6] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... In medicine, mastectomy is the medical term for the surgical removal of one or both breasts, partially or completely. ... Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Margaretta Large Fitler Murphy Rockefeller (born June 9, 1926) is the second wife and widow of Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (1908–1979), the 41st Vice President of the United States of America and a Governor of New York. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ...


Betty Ford was an advocate of the arts while First Lady, and was instrumental in Martha Graham receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1976. Martha Graham and Bertram Ross in Visionary Recital, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1961 Martha Graham (May 11, 1894 – April 1, 1991), an American dancer and choreographer, is known as one of the foremost pioneers of modern dance. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other major civilian award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, which...


The Betty Ford Center

Main article: Betty Ford Center

In 1978, the Ford family staged an intervention and forced Betty Ford to confront her alcoholism and an addiction to opioid analgesics that had been prescribed in the early 1960s for a pinched nerve. "I liked alcohol," she wrote in her 1987 memoir. "It made me feel warm. And I loved pills. They took away my tension and my pain". In 1982, after her recovery, she established the Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage, California, for the treatment of chemical dependency. Again, her candor in dealing with substance abuse and recovery led to an improvement in how Americans talked about such matters. She wrote about her treatment in a 1987 book, Betty: A Glad Awakening. In 2003 Ford produced another book, Healing and Hope: Six Women from the Betty Ford Center Share Their Powerful Journeys of Addiction and Recovery. The Betty Ford Center is a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center in Rancho Mirage, California co-founded by former United States First Lady Betty Ford and her friend, Ambassador Leonard Firestone, in 1982. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... An intervention is an orchestrated attempt by one, or often many, people (usually family and friends) to get someone to seek professional help with an addiction or some kind of traumatic event or crisis. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... Addiction is a chronic or recurrent condition proposed to be precipitated by one or more of the following: genetic, biological/pharmacological and social factors. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... An analgesic (colloquially known as a painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain (achieve analgesia). ... The Betty Ford Center is a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center in Rancho Mirage, California co-founded by former United States First Lady Betty Ford and her friend, Ambassador Leonard Firestone, in 1982. ... Rancho Mirage is a city located in Riverside County, California. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2005, Betty Ford relinquished her chairmanship of the center's board of directors to her daughter, Susan.


Later life

Betty Ford (right) with President George W. Bush and former President Ford on April 23, 2006.
Betty Ford (right) with President George W. Bush and former President Ford on April 23, 2006.

Betty Ford currently resides in Rancho Mirage, California, where she lived with her husband until his death on December 26, 2006. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... this guy is awsome i played him in a school play he also has some pretty funky history Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Rancho Mirage is a city located in Riverside County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 361st in leap years. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


In 1978 Ford published her autobiography, The Times of My Life. 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ...


In 1987 Betty Ford was inducted into the Michigan Women's Hall of Fame. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The history of the Michigan Womens Hall of Fame is available online at michiganwomenshalloffame. ...


In 1999 Betty and Gerald Ford were jointly given the Congressional Gold Medal, "in recognition of their dedicated public service and outstanding humanitarian contributions to the people of the United States of America." [1] 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ...


On April 5, 2007, it was reported that Betty Ford was recovering in California from surgery, though it was unclear what condition Ford had that prompted the surgery. During her hospitalization, Ford celebrated her 89th birthday.[2] April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ...


See also

actress Greta Garbo was a breast cancer patient This list of notable breast cancer patients includes people who made significant contributions to their chosen field and who were diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives, as confirmed by public information. ... If you wish to add someone to this list, please provide the full name and reputable links or sources to substantiate their inclusion or ensure that his or her Wikipedia article contains reputable links or sources. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Tucker, Neely, "Betty For, Again Putting On a Brave Face", The Washington Post, 29 December 2006
  2. ^ Jane Howard, "The 38th First Lady: Not a Robot At All", The New York Times, December 8, 1974
  3. ^ Steinhauer, Jennifer, "A First Lady Whose Legacy Rivals Husband's", The New York Times, December 30, 2006
  4. ^ Tucker, Neely, "Betty For, Again Putting On a Brave Face", The Washington Post, 29 December 2006
  5. ^ Steinhauer, Jennifer, "A First Lady Whose Legacy Rivals Husband's", The New York Times, December 30, 2006
  6. ^ "Breast Cancer: Fears and Facts", Time, November 4, 1974

The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... December 8 is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... December 30 is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 1 day remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Time, (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...

References

  • Betty Ford Biography. Ford Library & Museum. Retrieved December 29, 2006, University of Texas: http://www.ford.utexas.edu/grf/bbfbiop.htm
  • First Lady: Elizabeth "Betty" Bloomer Ford. First Lady: Biography. American President.org. Retrieved December 29, 2006, The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia: http://www.americanpresident.org/history/geraldford/firstlady/
  • Ford, Betty. (2006). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved December 29, 2006, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online: http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9096417
  • First Lady Biography: Betty Ford. firstladies.org. Retrieved December 29, 2006, The National First Ladies Library: http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=39 National First Ladies' Library biography]
  • Presidential Medal of Freedom Recipient Martha Graham. MedalofFreedom.com. Americans.net. Retrieved December 29, 2006, http://www.medaloffreedom.com/MarthaGraham.htm ]
Preceded by
Judy Agnew
Second Lady of the United States
1973-1974
Succeeded by
Happy Rockefeller
Preceded by
Pat Nixon
First Lady of the United States
1974-1977
Succeeded by
Rosalynn Carter
Preceded by
Lady Bird Johnson
United States order of precedence
as of 2007
Succeeded by
Nancy Reagan

  Results from FactBites:
 
Biography of Betty Ford (511 words)
Not long afterward she began dating Jerry Ford, football hero, graduate of the University of Michigan and Yale Law School, and soon a candidate for Congress.
Betty Ford faced her new life as First Lady with dignity and serenity.
She helped establish the Betty Ford Center for treatment of this problem at the Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage.
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