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Encyclopedia > Beta Comae Berenices
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Beta Comae Bernices
Observation data
Epoch J2000
Constellation Coma Berenices
Right ascension 13h 11m 52.4s
Declination +27° 52' 41"
Apparent magnitude (V) 4.26
Characteristics
Spectral type G0V
B-V color index 0.57
U-B color index 0.07
Variable type None
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) +5.2 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: -0.80194"/yr
Dec.: 0.88270"/yr
Parallax (π) 0.10887" ± 0.00069"
Distance 29.94 ly (9.185 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 4.45
Details
Mass 1.05 M
Radius 1.19 R
Luminosity 1.42 L
Temperature 6,000 K
Metallicity 146%
Rotation period
Age 4.1 ×109 years
Other designations
43 Com, Beta Com, Gl 502, GJ 876, HD 114710, HR 4983, BD +28°2193, GCTP 3015.00, LHS 348, LFT 978, LTT 13815, SAO 82706, FK5 492, HIP 64394.


Beta Coma Berenices (β Comae Berenices / β Com) is a main sequence dwarf star in the constellation of Coma Berenices. The Greek letter beta (β) usually indicates that the star has the second highest visual magnitude in the constellation. In actuality, however, it is slightly brighter than α Comae Berenices. In astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time for which celestial coordinates or orbital elements are specified. ... Jump to: navigation, search Orion is a remarkable constellation, visible from most places on the globe (but not always the whole year long). ... Coma Berenices (Latin for Berenices Hair) is a traditional asterism that has since become a constellation. ... Right ascension (RA; symbol α: Greek letter alpha) is the astronomical term for one of the two coordinates of a point on the celestial sphere when using the equatorial coordinate system. ... In astronomy, declination (dec) is one of the two coordinates of the equatorial coordinate system, the other being either right ascension or hour angle. ... The apparent magnitude (m) of a star, planet or other heavenly body is a measure of its apparent brightness; that is, the amount of light received from the object. ... Jump to: navigation, search In astronomy, stellar classification is a classification of stars based initially on photospheric temperature and its associated spectral characteristics, and subsequenly refined in terms of other characteristics. ... Jump to: navigation, search Shanil Davendra Singh rules 4 life! ... Jump to: navigation, search Shanil Davendra Singh rules 4 life! ... Most stars are of nearly constant luminosity. ... Astrometry is a part of astronomy and deals with the positions of stars and other celestial bodies, their distances and movements. ... Radial velocity is the velocity of an object in the direction of the line of sight. ... kilometre per second is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), signified by the symbol km/s or km s-1. ... The proper motion of a star is the motion of the position of the star in the sky (the change in direction in which we see it, as opposed to the radial velocity) after eliminating the improper motions of the stars, which affect their measured coordinates but are not real... Jump to: navigation, search A year is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... Jump to: navigation, search A year is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... Jump to: navigation, search Parallax (Greek: παραλλαγή (parallagé) = alteration) is the change of angular position of two stationary points relative to each other as seen by an observer, due to the motion of said observer. ... Jump to: navigation, search The distance between two points is the length of a straight line segment between them. ... A light year, abbreviated ly, is the distance light travels in one year: roughly 9. ... Jump to: navigation, search The parsec (symbol pc) is a unit of length used in astronomy. ... Jump to: navigation, search In astronomy, absolute magnitude is the apparent magnitude, m, an object would have if it were at a standardized distance away. ... Jump to: navigation, search Mass is a property of physical objects that, roughly speaking, measures the amount of matter they contain. ... In astronomy, the solar mass is a unit of mass used to express the mass of stars and larger objects such as galaxies. ... Jump to: navigation, search In classical geometry, a radius of a circle or sphere is any line segment with one endpoint on the circle (i. ... In astronomy, the solar radius is a unit of length used to express the size of stars and larger objects such as galaxies. ... Jump to: navigation, search // In General Physics In general physics, luminosity (more properly called luminance) is the density of luminous intensity in a given direction. ... The solar luminosity is a unit of luminosity (power emitted in the form of photons) conventionally used by astronomers to give the luminosities of stars. ... Temperature is the physical property of a system which underlies the common notions of hot and cold; the material with the higher temperature is said to be hotter. ... Jump to: navigation, search The kelvin (symbol: K) is the SI unit of temperature, and is one of the seven SI base units. ... Jump to: navigation, search In astronomy, the metallicity of an object is the proportion of its matter made up of chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium. ... In astronomy, a rotation period is the time an astronomical object takes to complete one revolution around its rotation axis. ... Look up Age on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Age may refer to: The length of time that a person has lived, reckoned from date of birth in most cultures; see also: ageing, for the social, cultural, and economic factors of age and ageing. ... Jump to: navigation, search A year is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... The Henry Draper Catalogue is an astronomy catalogue with astrometric and spectroscopic data about more than 225,000 stars. ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) is a research institute of the Smithsonian Institution headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where it is joined with the Harvard College Observatory (HCO) to form the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). ... In astronomy, many stars are referred to simply by catalogue numbers. ... Hertzsprung-Russell diagram The main sequence of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is the curve where the majority of stars are located in this diagram. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Pleiades star cluster A star is a massive body of plasma in outer space that is currently producing or has produced energy through nuclear fusion. ... Jump to: navigation, search Orion is a remarkable constellation, visible from most places on the globe (but not always the whole year long). ... Coma Berenices (Latin for Berenices Hair) is a traditional asterism that has since become a constellation. ... Technical note: Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... Jump to: navigation, search The second letter of the Greek alphabet, Î’ β, also has some cultural meanings; see beta (letter). ... The apparent magnitude (m) of a star, planet or other heavenly body is a measure of its apparent brightness; that is, the amount of light received from the object. ... Jump to: navigation, search Alpha Comae Berenices (α Com / α Comae Berenices) is a star in the constellation Coma Berenices (Berenices Hair). ...


This star is similar to our own Sun, being only slightly larger and brighter in absolute magnitude. The surface of this star has a measured activity cycle of 16.6 years (compared to 11 years on our Sun.) It may also have a secondary activity cycle of 9.6 years. At one time it was though that this star may have a spectroscopic companion. However this was ruled out by means of more accurate radial velocity measurements. No planets have yet been detected around this star, and there is no evidence of a dusty disk. Jump to: navigation, search The Sun is the star at the centre of our Solar system. ... Jump to: navigation, search In astronomy, absolute magnitude is the apparent magnitude, m, an object would have if it were at a standardized distance away. ... A spectroscopic binary star is a binary star which cannot be resolved as a visual binary, even with telescopes of the highest existing resolving power. ... Jump to: navigation, search A planet in common parlance is a large object in orbit around a star that is not a star itself. ... A protoplanetary disc (also protoplanetary disk, proplyd) is an accretion disc surrounding a T Tauri star. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Coma Berenices at AllExperts (1610 words)
FK Comae Berenices, which varies between magnitudes 8.14m and 8.33m over a period of 2.4 days, is the prototype for the FK Comae class of variable stars.
R Comae Berenices is a Mira variable star that varies between magnitudes 7.1m and 14.6m over a period of 363 days.
The Coma cluster of galaxies is to the north of the Virgo cluster.
Beta Comae and the “Liberation” (2453 words)
Beta Comae 5 was renamed New Australia by its new inhabitants for its vast outback-like deserts and grasslands and also for the rugged frontiersman like culture, which had developed through years of struggle in the sometimes harsh wilderness of the planet.
The Beta Comaens were portrayed as a group of reactionary troublemakers who indulged in questionable outsystem behaviour, had resentment towards the mother planet, and worst of all refused to be abided by the legally binding contracts that they had wilfully signed upon boarding the colonial transports.
Despite being able to secure many of Beta Comae’s quite substantial cities with little bloodshed (to the relief of the Liberation’s PR unit) every time they ventured out of their strongholds soldiers and machines would be picked off or immobilised by hit and run tactics, each one more ingenious or crazy than the last.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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