FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Bet exchange

A betting exchange is a p2p gambling website acting as a broker between parties for the placement of bets. The concept is similar to that of a stock exchange or a futures exchange, where in this case the commodity being traded is a bet, rather than a stock or futures contract. Most betting on a betting exchange is a form of fixed odds gambling. A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... Gambling or Gaming [1] has had many different meanings depending on the cultural and historical context in which it is used. ... A futures exchange, is a corporation or organization which provides a marketplace in which to trade derivatives such as futures contracts and options. ... Black Entertainment Television (BET for short) is the first television network geared towards African-Americans. ... It has been suggested that shareholder be merged into this article or section. ... In finance, a futures contract is a standardized contract, traded on a futures exchange, to buy or sell a certain underlying instrument at a certain date in the future, at a specified price. ... Fixed-odds gambling is a form of gambling against odds offered by a bookmaker, an individual, or on a bet exchange. ...

Contents

History

The concept was first brought to the public by the UK website Flutter.com in May 2000 in person-to-person betting form, followed closely by UK-based Betfair in June 2000. Betfair embraced a pure exchange model - one Flutter later adopted and even improved upon in places - but first-mover advantage proved decisive for Betfair. Though Flutter managed to climb to a reported 30% market share, Flutter's backers were content to broker a merger which left Betfair the dominant partner by a reported ratio of 84:16. Post merger, Flutter's customers were transferred to Betfair's system, which was later upgraded to embrace some of Flutter's functionality. Betfair went from strength to strength and controls a reported 90% of global exchange activity today. In late 2004, Betfair announced a rescue package which resulted in it absorbing the customers of Sporting Options, which had gone into administration with debts in excess of £5 million. Betfair Logo Betfair is the worlds largest Internet betting exchange. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sporting Options was an English betting exchange, based in Sussex. ...


As with other types of exchanges, betting exchanges thrive on liquidity and customers tend to focus on the exchange where they are confident their bet can be paired up with a matching counterbet. Breaking with British tradition, Betfair uses decimal odds instead of fractional (traditional) odds because they are more popular globally. Some of its competitors allow customers to use fractional odds if they prefer. Market liquidity is a business or economics term that refers to the ability to quickly buy or sell a particular item without causing a significant movement in the price. ... The decimal (base ten or occasionally denary) numeral system has ten as its base. ... Fixed-odds gambling is a form of gambling against odds offered by a bookmaker, an individual, or on a bet exchange. ...


Exchanges make their money by charging a commission which is calculated as a percentage of net winnings for each customer on each event, or market. Gamblers whose betting activities have traditionally been restricted by bookmakers (normally for winning too much money) have found these sites a boon since they are now able to place bets of a size unrestricted by the exchange - the only restriction is that one or more opposing customers need to be willing match their bets. Moreover, the odds available on a betting exchange are usually better than those offered by bookmakers in spite of the commission charged. In probability theory and statistics the odds in favor of an event or a proposition are the quantity p / (1 − p), where p is the probability of the event or proposition. ...


Exchanges have their limitations. Exchanges are not suited to unrestricted multiple parlay betting. Betfair does offer accumulators of their own content management construction, but these are limited in number. Users cannot determine the outcomes contained in accumulators themselves. Exchanges also tend to restrict the odds that can be offered to between 1.01 (1/100) and 1000 (999/1).


Unsurprisingly, Betfair's success has attracted a number of rivals.


"Laying" an outcome

Exchanges also offer the opportunity to lay outcomes, which is to bet that a particular participant in an event will lose. This is the position bookmakers take when offering a bet for somebody to back that the participant will win.


For example, if someone thinks Team A will win a competition, he may wish to back that selection. A bookmaker offering the punter that bet would be laying that selection. The two parties will agree the backer's stake and the odds. If the team loses, the layer/bookmaker keeps the backer's stake. If the team wins, the layer will pay the backer winnings based on the odds agreed.


As every bet transacted requires a backer and a layer, and the betting exchange is not a party to the bets transacted on it, any betting exchange requires both backers and layers. Of course, the distinction is moot: A layer is always simply backing the opposite outcome. Laying the home team is the same as backing the visiting team to win or draw. Laying one horse in a race is just the same as backing all of the other horses to win.


"Trading"

In addition to the "traditional" punters who have flocked to the Betfair and its smaller rivals, the advent of the betting exchange has given rise to a new type of gambler - the trader. The most conservative type of trader is not concerned with the final outcome of a race or match, but instead "bets" on both sides of a proposition prior to the start of the match. If he can get a favourable price differential between his bets (that is to say, if he is able to back the proposition at longer odds than he "laid off" the proposition at), the trader will make a profit. Unlike most stock exchanges which charge a commission for every transaction, exchanges only charge commission on the net "winnings" and when the trader breaks even or loses money on a particular market, he pays no commission at all.


Barring unexpected events, the net "winnings" (or loss) for a trader will typically be no more than 5% of the amount originally "bet" - so to try and make substantial amounts of money a trader needs to commit a significant amount of capital. The bulk of a trader's capital can be protected if he "closes" any "open" position before the match/race being bet on (or in some other way affecting the outcome) begins. The biggest risk for a trader is the exchange's technical reliability - if the website crashes shortly before the start of the race/match and the trader is unable to close his open positions on time, his capital will be in serious jeopardy.


While some "traditional" punters frown on trading, keeping the traders happy is probably very important to Betfair because they are believed to be the primary source of capital in the client accounts, which is what provides the liquidity that Betfair's competitors have not yet been able to match. Betfair have acknowledged their "unplanned outages" and attributed them to technical and hardware issues. Market liquidity is a business or economics term that refers to the ability to quickly buy or sell a particular item without causing a significant movement in the price. ...


Controversy

The fact gamblers can now lay outcomes on the exchanges has resulted in criticism from traditional bookmakers including the UK's "Big Three" - Gala Coral Group, Ladbrokes and William Hill. These firms argue that granting "anonymous" punters the ability to bet that an outcome will not happen is causing corruption in sports such as horse racing since it is much easier to ensure a horse will lose a race. Gala Coral Group Ltd is a British betting shop, bingo and casino operator. ... Ladbrokes, part of Hilton Group plc, is the second-largest chain of betting shops in the United Kingdom, after William Hill plc. ... The William Hill logo William Hill plc is one of the two largest bookmakers in the United Kingdom alongside Ladbrokes, which is owned by Hilton Group plc. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Match fixing or game fixing in organized sports occurs when a match is played to a completely or partially pre-determined result. ...


Exchanges counter that, while corruption is possible on any gambling platform, the bookies' arguments are motivated not by concern for the integrity of sport but by commercial interests. Exchanges also assert they are well aware of who their customers are and some have signed agreements with governing bodies of sport including the Jockey Club, with whom they insist they will co-operate with fully if the latter suspects corruption to have taken place. In the summer of 2004, Betfair provided data to investigators, including the City of London Police which on September 1 lead to 16 arrests on charges related to race fixing. Among those arrested was champion jockey Kieren Fallon, whose case remains before the courts. Look up integrity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Commerce is the trading of something of economic value such as goods, services, information or money between two or more entities. ... A sport governing body comes in several forms. ... The Jockey Club is responsible for the day-to-day regulation of United Kingdom horse-racing. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... City Police Mounted Section officer The City of London Police is the Home Office police force responsible for the City of London, including the Middle and Inner Temple. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Match fixing or game fixing in organized sports occurs when a match is played to a completely or partially pre-determined result. ... Toulouse-Lautrec - The Jockey (1899) This article is about the sports occupation. ... Kieren Fallon (born February 22, 1965) in Crusheen, County Clare Ireland is a flat racing jockey and has been United Kingdom champion jockey six times. ...


See also

Sports betting is the general activity of predicting sports results by making a wager on the outcome of a sporting event. ... A bookmaker, bookie or turf accountant, is an organisation or a person that takes bets and may pay winnings depending upon results and, depending on the nature of the bet, the odds. ... Gambling or Gaming [1] has had many different meanings depending on the cultural and historical context in which it is used. ... Parimutuel betting (from the French language: pari mutuel, mutual betting) is a betting system in which all bets of a particular type are placed together in a pool; taxes and a house take are removed, and payoff odds are calculated by sharing the pool among all placed bets, rounded down... Spread betting is a form of gambling on the outcome of any event where the more accurate the gamble, the more is won and conversely the less accurate the more is lost. ... Matched betting is a form of betting similar to arbitrage betting which can be used as a way of extracting free bets from bookmakers without the risk of losing money. ...

Betting exchanges

Betfair Logo Betfair is the worlds largest Internet betting exchange. ... Tradesports, similar to Betfair, is an on-line sports betting exchange. ... BETDAQ is a betting exchange founded in Ireland by the businessman Dermot Desmond. ... BackAndLay is a betting exchange based in the United Kingdom, its most distinctive feature is the 1% commission it charges on a net winning position in a market unlike its main rival Betfair who charge between 2% and 5%. A betting exchange allows punters to wager at odds set and...

External links

  • Bloomberg article on betting exchanges
  • Tactical Trader article about betting exchange trading
  • An analysis of the betting exchange industry

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m