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Encyclopedia > Bestseller

A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on lists of currently top selling titles that are based on publishing industry and booktrade figures and published by newspapers, magazines, or bookstore chains. Some lists are broken down into classifications and specialties (number one best selling new cookbook, novel, nonfiction, etc.). The New York Times Best Seller list is one of the best-known bestseller lists for the US. A book is a set or collection of written, printed, illustrated, or blank sheets, made of paper, parchment, or other material, usually fastened together to hinge at one side. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The New York Times Best Seller List is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. ...


In everyday use, the term bestseller is not usually associated with a specified level of sales, and may be used very loosely indeed in publisher's publicity. Bestsellers tend not to be books considered of superior academic value or literary quality, though there are exceptions. Lists simply give the highest-selling titles in the category over the stated period. Some books have sold many more copies than contemporary "bestsellers", but over a long period of time. The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Academia is a collective term for the scientific and cultural community engaged in higher education and research, taken as a whole. ... Literary Merit a written text has Liteary Merit if it is a work of quality, that is if it has some aesthetic value. ...


Blockbusters for films and chart-toppers in recorded music are similar terms, although, in film and music, these measures generally are related to industry sales figures for attendance, requests, broadcast plays, or units sold. Blockbuster, as applied to film or theater, denotes a very popular and/or successful production. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... In popular music, a chart-topper is an extremely popular recording, identified by its inclusion in a ranked list—a chart—of top selling or otherwise judged most popular releases. ... // Music is an art form consisting of sound and silence expressed through time. ...


Particularly in the case of novels, a large budget, and a chain of literary agents, editors, publishers, reviewers, retailers, and marketing efforts are involved in "making" bestsellers. A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Editing may also refer to audio editing or film editing. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Look up Review in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A drawing of a self-service store Retailing consists of the sale of goods/merchandise for personal or household consumption either from a fixed location such as a department store or kiosk, or away from a fixed location and related subordinated services (Definition of the WTO (last page). ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up marketing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Early bestsellers

The term bestseller, has a relatively modern etymological origin since it was first used in 1889[citation needed], but the phenomenon of immediate popularity goes back to the early days of mass production of printed books. For earlier books, when the maximum number of copies that would be printed was relatively small, a count of editions is the best way to assess sales. Since effective copyright was slow to take hold, many editions were pirated (in modern terms) well into the period of the Enlightenment, and without effective royalty systems in place, authors often saw little, if any, of the revenues for their popular works. Not to be confused with Entomology, the study of insects. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Copyright infringement is the unauthorized use of copyrighted material in a manner that violates one of the copyright owners exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce or perform the copyrighted work, or to make derivative works that build upon it. ... The Age of Enlightenment (French: ; German: ) was an eighteenth-century movement in European and American philosophy, or the longer period including the Age of Reason. ...


The earliest highly popular books were nearly all religious, but the Bible, as a large book, remained expensive until the nineteenth century. This tended to keep the numbers printed and sold low. Unlike today, it was important for a book to be short to be a bestseller, or it would be too expensive to reach a large audience. Very short works such as Ars moriendi, the Biblia pauperum, and versions of the Apocalypse were published as cheap block-books in large numbers of different editions in several languages in the fifteenth century. These were probably affordable items for most of the minority of literate members of the population. In 16th and 17th century England Pilgrim's Progress (1678) and abridged versions of Foxe's Book of Martyrs were the most broadly read books. Robinson Crusoe (1719) and Roderick Random (1748) were early eighteenth century short novels with very large publication numbers, as well as gaining international success.[1] This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Pride of the spirit is one of the five temptations of the dying man, according to Ars moriendi. ... The Biblia pauperum (Paupers Bible) was a tradition of picture Bibles beginning in the later Middle Ages. ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Yuan Dynasty woodblock edition of a Chinese play For the use of the technique in art, see Woodcut on the technique, and Old master print for the history in Europe and woodblock printing in Japan. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The Pilgrims Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come by John Bunyan (published 1678) is an allegorical novel. ... Events August 10 - Treaty of Nijmegen ends the Dutch War. ... William Tyndale, just before being burnt at the stake, cries out Lord, ope the King of Englands eies in this woodcut from an early edition of Foxes Book of Martyrs. ... Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published in 1719 and sometimes regarded as the first novel in English. ... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... The Adventures of Roderick Random is a novel by Tobias George Smollett. ... Events April 24 - A congress assembles at Aix-la-Chapelle with the intent to conclude the struggle known as the War of Austrian Succession - at October 18 - The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle is signed to end the war Adam Smith begins to deliver public lectures in Edinburgh Building of...


Tristram Shandy, a rather long novel by Laurence Sterne, became a "cult" object in England and throughout Europe, with important cultural consequences among those who could afford to purchase books during the era of its publication. The same could be said of the works of Rousseau, especially Julie, ou la nouvelle Héloïse (1761), and of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's novel, Die Leiden des jungen Werther (The Sorrows of Young Werther) (1774). As with some modern bestsellers, Werther spawned what today, would be called a spin-off industry, with items such as Werther eau de cologne and porcelain puppets depicting the main characters, being sold in large numbers.[2] The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (or, more briefly, Tristram Shandy) is a novel by Laurence Sterne. ... Laurence Sterne Laurence Sterne (November 24, 1713 – March 18, 1768) was an Anglo-Irish novelist and clergyman. ... Rousseau is a French surname. ... Julie, ou la nouvelle Héloïse is an epistolary romance novel by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, published in 1761 by Rey (Amsterdam). ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...  , IPA: , (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German polymath. ... The Sorrows of Young Werther (Die Leiden des jungen Werther, originally published as Die Leiden des jungen Werthers) is an epistolary and loosely autobiographical novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, first published in 1774. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ...


By the time of Byron and Sir Walter Scott, effective copyright laws existed, at least in England, and many authors depended heavily on their income from their large royalties. America remained a zone of piracy until the mid-nineteenth century, a fact of which Charles Dickens, and Mark Twain, bitterly complained. By the middle of the 19th century, a situation akin to modern publication had emerged, where most bestsellers were written for a popular taste and are now almost entirely forgotten, with odd exceptions such as East Lynne (remembered only for the line "Gone, gone, and never called me mother!"), the wildly popular Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Sherlock Holmes. The poet George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron is often referred to simply as Byron. ... Raeburns portrait of Sir Walter Scott in 1822. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 — April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, writer, and lecturer. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... East Lynne is a novel of 1861 by Mrs. ... Uncle Toms Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly, is American author Harriet Beecher Stowes fictional anti-slavery novel. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ...


Description and types of bestseller

Bestsellers are usually separated into fiction and non-fiction categories. Different list compilers have created a number of other subcategories. The New York Times was reported to have started its "Children's Books" section in 2001 just to move the Harry Potter books out of the No. 1, 2, and 3 positions on their fiction chart, which the then three book series had monopolized for over a year.[3] // Fiction (from the Latin fingere, to form, create) is the genre of imaginative prose literature, including novels and short stories. ... Non-fiction is an account or representation of a subject which is presented as fact. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ...


Bestsellers also may be ranked separately for hardcover and paperback editions. Typically, a hardcover edition appears first, followed in months or years by the much less expensive paperback version. Hardcover bestseller status may hasten the paperback release of the same, or slow the release, if hardcover sales are brisk enough. Some lists even have a third category, trade paperback bestsellers. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... A trade paperback can refer to any book that is bound with a heavy paper cover that is generally cheaper than the hardcover but more expensive than the regular paperback version. ...


In the United Kingdom, a hardcover book could be considered a "bestseller" with sales ranging from 4,000 to 25,000 copies per week, and in Canada, the rule of thumb is 5,000 copies per week,* although the number remains relative—a book may be considered a bestseller in relation to other books without ever reaching that threshold. There are many "bestseller lists" that display anywhere from 10 to 150 titles. A rule of thumb is an easily learned and easily applied procedure for approximately calculating or recalling some value, or for making some determination. ...


Literary perception

Partly due to commercialization, the term bestseller may acquire a pejorative or negative connotation, particularly in fiction, indicating a work of inferior literary quality with mass appeal. Nonetheless, the term is widely used in book marketing, with its bestseller status advertised prominently on the cover of paperback editions whenever possible. // Fiction (from the Latin fingere, to form, create) is the genre of imaginative prose literature, including novels and short stories. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up marketing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Commercialism redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Differences among lists

Bestseller lists may vary widely, depending on the method used for calculating sales. The Book Sense bestseller lists, for example, use only sales numbers, provided by independently-owned (non-chain) bookstores, while the New York Times list includes both wholesale and retail sales from a variety of sources. A book that sells well in gift shops and grocery stores may hit a New York Times list without ever appearing on a Book Sense list. USA Today has only one list, not separated into fiction/non-fiction and hardcover/paperback, so that relative sales among these categories can be ascertained. Book Sense is a family of independent booksellers who organized in order to better compete with the large book chains. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...


Lists from Amazon.com, the dominant on-line book retailer, are based only on sales from their own Web site, and are updated on an hourly basis. Wholesale sales figures are not factored into Amazon's calculations. Numerous Web sites offer advice for authors about a temporary method to boost their book higher on Amazon's list using carefully-timed buying campaigns that take advantage of the frequent adjustments to rankings. The brief sales spike allows authors to tout that their book was an "Amazon.com top 100 seller" in marketing materials for books that actually have relatively low sales. Eventually book buyers may begin to recognize the relative differences among lists and settle upon which lists they will consult to determine their purchases. Amazon. ...


The weight and price of a book may affect its positioning on lists. The Amazon.com list tends to favor hardcover, more expensive books, where the shipping charge is a smaller percentage of the overall purchase price or is sometimes free, and which tend to be more deeply discounted than paperbacks are. Inexpensive mass market paperbacks tend to do better on the New York Times list than on Amazon's. Book Sense and Publisher's Weekly separate mass market paperbacks onto their own list. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Categories: Stub | Books ... Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ...


Category structure affects the positioning of a book in other ways. A book that might be buried on the Book Sense hardcover fiction list could be positioned very well on the New York Times hardcover advice list or the Publisher's Weekly religion hardcover list.


Verifiability

Bestseller reports from companies such as Amazon.com, which appear to be based strictly on auditable sales to the public, may be at odds with bestseller lists compiled from more casual data, such as the New York Times lists' survey of retailers and publishers. The method for ranking the New York Times bestseller lists is a closely-guarded secret. Statistical surveys are used to collect quantitative information about items in a population. ... Drawing of a self-service store. ...


This situation suggests a similar one in the area of popular music. In 1991, Billboard magazine switched its chart data from manual reports filed by stores, to automated cash register data collected by a service called SoundScan. The conversion saw a dramatic shake-up in chart content from one week to the next. Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and are disseminated by one or more of the mass media. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ... plotting redirects here. ... Antique crank-operated cash register This article is about the cash register. ... Nielsen SoundScan is an information system created by Nielsen Media Research that tracks sales data for singles, albums, and music video products in Canada and the United States for Billboard and other music industry companies. ...


Today, many lists come from automated sources. Booksellers may use their POS (point-of-sale) systems to report automatically to Book Sense. Wholesalers such as the giant Ingram Book Group have bestseller calculations similar to Amazon's, but they are available only to subscribing retailers. Barnes & Noble and other large retail chains collect sales data from retail outlets and their Web sites to build their own bestseller lists. POS must not be confused with EFT/POS and POS Terminal used in Electronic payment POS or PoS is an acronym for point-of-sale (or point of purchase). ... Ingram Book Group is a United States based book wholesaler and distributor. ... A typical Barnes & Noble bookstore. ...


Nielsen BookScan U.S. is perhaps the most aggressive attempt to produce a completely automatic and trusted set of bestseller lists. They claim to be gathering data directly from cash registers at more than 4,500 retail locations, including independent bookstores, large chains such as Barnes & Noble, Powell's Books, and Borders, and the general retailer Costco. Unlike the consumer-oriented lists, BookScan's data is extremely detailed and quite expensive. Subscriptions to BookScan cost up to $75,000 per year, but it can provide publishers and wholesalers with an accurate picture of book sales with regional and other statistical analyses. A typical Barnes & Noble bookstore. ... Powells NW 10th & Burnside entrance Powells Books is a chain of bookstores in the Portland metropolitan area with origins in Chicago, Illinois. ... Borders Group (NYSE: BGP) is an international bookseller based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Costco Wholesale Corporation (NASDAQ: COST) is the largest membership warehouse club chain in the world based on sales volume, headquartered in Issaquah, Washington, United States,[1] with its flagship warehouse in nearby Seattle. ...


The making of a bestseller

Ultimately, having a great number of buyers creates a bestseller, however, there is a distinct "making of" process that determines which books have the potential to achieve that status. Not all publishers rely on, nor strive for, bestsellers, as the survival of small presses indicates. Large publishing houses, on the other hand, are like major record labels and film studios, and require consistent high returns to maintain their large overhead. Thus, the stakes are high. It is estimated that 200,000 new books are published each year in the U.S., and less than 1% achieve bestseller status.[4] Along the way, major players act as gatekeepers and enablers, including literary agents, editors, publishing houses, booksellers, and the media (particularly, publishers of book reviews and bestseller lists). In the U.S., the five major publishers—Random House, HarperCollins, Time Warner, Penguin USA, and Simon & Schuster—are responsible for about 80% of bestsellers; the five majors together with the next five largest publishers—Von Holtzbrinck, Hyperion, Rodale Press, Houghton Mifflin, and Harlequin—control around 98% of all United States bestsellers.[4] At least equally influential are the marketing efforts, including advertising, promotion, and publicity. The high visibility of an established and best-selling author is paramount in the equation also. In addition to writing the book, an author has to acquire representation and negotiate this publishing chain.[5] The Dun Emer Press in 1903 with Elizabeth Yeats working the hand press Small press is a term often used to describe publishers who typically specialize in genre fiction, or limited edition books or magazines. ... Random House is a publishing division of the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann based in New York City. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... Time Warner Inc. ... Penguin Group is the second largest trade book publisher in the world. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... Hyperion is a general-interest book publishing division of The Walt Disney Company, established in 1991. ... Rodale Inc. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... “Arlecchino” redirects here. ... Commercialism redirects here. ... Promotion may mean: Promotion (chess), a term used in the game of chess Promotion (marketing), a marketing term Promotion (rank), an increase in position in a hierarchy Promotion (academic), German academic degree that is roughly equivalent to the Ph. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up publicity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


At least one scientific approach to creating bestsellers has been devised. In 2004, Didier Sornette, a professor of geophysics and a complex systems theorist at UCLA, using Amazon.com sales data, created a mathematical model for predicting bestseller potential based on very early sales results. This information could be used to identify a potential for bestseller status and recommend fine tuned advertising and publicity efforts accordingly.[6] shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... There are many definitions of complexity, therefore many natural, artificial and abstract objects or networks can be considered to be complex systems, and their study (complexity science) is highly interdisciplinary. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... Commercialism redirects here. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up publicity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Cultural role

While the basic dictionary definition of bestseller is self-evident, "a popular, top-selling book", the practical cultural definition is somewhat more complex. As consumer bestseller lists generally do not detail specific criteria, such as numbers sold, sales period, sales region, and so forth, a book becomes a bestseller mainly because an "authoritative" source says it is. Calling a book a "top-selling" title is not so impressive as calling it "the New York Times bestseller". Although the former phrase is assumed to be derived from sales figures, the latter benefits from the high profile of the particular list. A book that is identified as a "bestseller" greatly improves its chance of selling to a much wider audience. In this way, bestseller has taken on its own popular meaning, rather independent of empirical data, by becoming a compromised product category and, in effect, attempting to create a marketing image. For example, a "summer bestseller" is usually determined long before the summer is over, and signals a book's suitability for millions of lounging pool-side readers.


The use of the marketing phrase, underground bestseller further illustrates the independent-from-sales, self-defining aspect of the term. For example, publisher HarperCollins suggested the bestseller potential of Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood: A Novel by announcing "...four years after her award-winning, underground bestseller, Little Altars Everywhere..." in the promotion. The book went on to achieve bestseller status in the 1990s. In reviews of the 2002 film of the same name, the novel's bestseller status was cited routinely, as in "compelling adaptation of Rebecca Wells' bestseller".[7]


The famous Diogenes Publisher at Zürich (Swiss) started to talk about its own Worstsellers in 2006, and therewith brought a new mode-word into the German speaking European countries (carreer?). Diogenes (Διογένης) is a Greek name shared by several important historical figures: Diogenes of Sinope ( 412- 323 BC), better known as Diogenes the Cynic or simply Diogenes Diogenes Apolloniates (c:a 460 BC), philosopher Diogenes of Seleukia (c:a 150 BC) Diogenes Laertius... View of the inner city with the four main churches visible, and the Albis in the backdrop Zürich (German: , Zürich German: Züri , French: , in English generally Zurich, Italian: ) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and... Look up mode in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A word is a unit of language that carries meaning and consists of one or more morphemes which are linked more or less tightly together, and has a phonetical value. ...


Connection with the movie industry

Bestsellers play a significant role in the mainstream movie industry. There is a long-standing Hollywood practice of turning fiction bestsellers into feature films. Many, if not the majority, of modern movie "classics" began as bestsellers. On the Publisher's Weekly fiction bestsellers of the year charts, we find: #2. The Godfather (1969); #1. Love Story (1970); #2. The Exorcist (1971); #3. Jaws (1974); among many others. Several of each year's fiction bestsellers ultimately are made into high-profile movies. Being a bestseller novel in the U.S. during the last forty years has guaranteed consideration for a big budget, wide-release movie.[8] Look up mainstream in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ... The Godfather is a 1972 crime film based on the novel of the same name by Mario Puzo and directed by Francis Ford Coppola, with screenplay by Puzo and Coppola. ... Love Story is a 1970 romantic drama film written by Erich Segal based on his 1970 best-selling novel, and directed by Arthur Hiller. ... The Exorcist is a horror novel written by William Peter Blatty first published in 1971. ... Peter Bradford Benchley (May 8, 1940 – February 11, 2006) was an American author best known for writing the novel Jaws and co-writing the screenplay for its highly successful film adaptation. ...


See also

This page provides lists of best-selling single-volume books, book series, authors, and childrens books of all time and in any language. ... This is a list of bestselling novels in the United States, as determined by Publishers Weekly. ...

References

  1. ^ For details of editions, see individual articles (in most cases)
  2. ^ Hoffmeister, Gerhart. "Die Leiden des jungen Werthers (The Sorrows of Young Werther)". The Literary Encyclopedia. 17 Jun 2004. The Literary Dictionary Company. Retrieved 17 Mar 2006
  3. ^ Bolonik, Kera. "A list of their own". Salon.com:August 16, 2000. Retrieved December 7, 2005.
  4. ^ a b Maryles, Daisy. Bestsellers by the Numbers". Publishers Weekly; 9-Jan-2006. Retrieved 22-Apr-2006.
  5. ^ Hill, Brian and Power, Dee. The Making of a Bestseller: Success Stories from Authors and the Editors, Agents, and Booksellers Behind Them. Kaplan Business; March 1, 2005. ISBN 0-7931-9308-7.
  6. ^ "Researchers use physics to analyze dynamics of bestsellers". PhysOrg.com: December 5, 2004. Retrieved Dec. 7, 2005.
    "UCLA Physicist Applies Physics to Best-Selling Books". UCLA News: December 1, 2004. Retrieved December 7, 2005.
  7. ^ About Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, HarperCollins. The review quote is from Movies Unlimited. Numerous such mentions may be located by a Web search for "film version Rebecca Wells bestseller" or similar. All retrieved 17 March 2006.
  8. ^ Publisher's Weekly Bestseller Lists 1990-1995. Correlation with movies may be achieved by searching at Internet Movie Database (IMDb). Both retrieved 17 March 2006.

June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Further reading

  • Alan T. Sorensen (2004). Bestseller Lists and Product Variety: The Case of Book Sales.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bestseller - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1800 words)
In everyday usage, the term bestseller is not usually associated with a specified level of sales, or considered of superior academic value or literary quality, it simply implies great popularity, similar to blockbuster for films and chart-topper in music (although, in film and music, these measures are generally related to sales figures or units sold).
Therefore, bestsellers are to a degree self-defining, in that identifying a book as a bestseller may be enough to establish it as such in the public mind.
Bestsellers may also be ranked separately for hardcover and paperback editions.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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