FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Berwick upon Tweed" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Berwick upon Tweed
Map sources for Berwick-upon-Tweed at grid reference NT9952
Enlarge
Map sources for Berwick-upon-Tweed at grid reference NT9952
Berwick-upon-Tweed from across the river
Berwick-upon-Tweed from across the river

Berwick-upon-Tweed, (pronounced "Berrick") situated in the county of Northumberland, is the northernmost town in England, situated on the east coast on the mouth of the river Tweed. Although in that region the Tweed forms the border between England and Scotland, and Berwick is located on the northern, Scottish, side, the modern boundary diverts itself around the town to keep it in England. In 1991 the town had a population of 13,500. It is the administrative centre of the borough of Berwick-upon-Tweed. The town proper lies on the north bank and to the north of the River Tweed, and was formerly the county town of Berwickshire in Scotland. Download high resolution version (1802x2589, 189 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Berwick-upon-Tweed Categories: GFDL images | GBdot ... Download high resolution version (1802x2589, 189 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Berwick-upon-Tweed Categories: GFDL images | GBdot ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... Berwick-upon-Tweed from across the Tweed. ... Berwick-upon-Tweed from across the Tweed. ... For other places with this name, see Northumberland Northumberland is a county in England, on the border with Scotland. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... The River Tweed at Abbotsford, near Melrose The River Tweed at Coldstream The River Tweed (156 kilometres or 97 miles long) flows primarily through the Borders region of Scotland. ... Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country in northwest Europe, occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain. ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Berwick-upon-Tweed is a local government district and borough in Northumberland in the north_east of England, on the border with Scotland. ... The River Tweed at Abbotsford, near Melrose The River Tweed at Coldstream The River Tweed (156 kilometres or 97 miles long) flows primarily through the Borders region of Scotland. ... Berwickshire (Siorrachd Bhearaig in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland, on the border with England. ...


Berwick is a market town and, if it is taken to include the village of Tweedmouth on the southern bank of the Tweed, a very modest international seaport. For a period of 300 and more years from the mid 11th century the town was an extremely important strategic asset in the wars between England and Scotland. The architecture of the town reflects its past, in particular in having one of the finest remaining defensive walls - albeit one much repaired in the late 18th Century - and in the Barracks buildings. Map sources for Berwick-upon-Tweed at grid reference NT9952 Berwick-upon-Tweed from across the river Berwick-upon-Tweed, (pronounced Berrick) situated in the county of Northumberland, is the northernmost town in England, situated on the east coast on the mouth of the river Tweed. ... Categories: Stub | Commercial item transport and distribution | Transportation ... Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country in northwest Europe, occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain. ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ...


The town's population in the 2001 Census was 11,665 (including Spittal, Tweedmouth, Ord &c; this within a borough population of 25,949). 59.5% of the population are employed, and 3.6% unemployed. 19% are retired. [1]. Slightly more than 60% of the population is employed in the service sector, including shops, hotels and catering, financial services and most government activity, including health care. About 13% is in manufacturing; 10% in agriculture, and 8% in construction [2]. Some current and recent Berwick economic activities include salmon fishing, shipbuilding, engineering, sawmilling, fertilizer production, and the manufacture of tweed and hosiery. Census 2001 is the name by which the national census conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001 is known. ... The Chinook or King Salmon is the largest salmon in North America and can grow up to 58 long and 126 pounds. ... This article or section should include material from Saw mill A sawmill is a facility where logs are cut into boards. ... Fertilizers are chemicals given to plants with the intention of promoting growth; they are usually applied either via the soil or by foliar spraying. ...


It is unique for an English town in that its football team Berwick Rangers F.C. plays its matches in the Scottish Football League. Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Berwick Rangers F.C. is a football team based in the English town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, but currently playing in the Scottish Football League. ... The Scottish Football League is a league of football (soccer) teams in Scotland. ...


The local dialect known as 'Tweedside' is a combination of Scottish and Northumbrian accents, although it is recognisably more Scottish. This may reflect the fact that Berwick is slightly closer to Scottish capital Edinburgh than North-Eastern centre Newcastle. A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος) is a variety of a language used by people from a particular geographic area. ... Scottish can refer to: adjective for Scotland see: Scotch the Scottish people. ... Northumbria is primarily the name of an Anglian or Anglo-Saxon kingdom which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, and of the earldom which succeeded the kingdom. ... Edinburghs location in Scotland Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ... Places on Earth named Newcastle Australia Newcastle, New South Wales Canada Newcastle, New Brunswick Newcastle, Ontario West Indies Newcastle, Nevis, Saint Kitts and Nevis South Africa Newcastle, South Africa, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa United Kingdom Newcastle, Northern Ireland Newcastle Emlyn, Carmarthenshire, Wales Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyneside, England Newcastle-under-Lyme...

Contents


History

Berwick's strategic position on the English Scottish border during centuries of war between the two nations, and its relatively great wealth led to a succession of raids, sieges and take-overs. Between 1147 and 1482 the town changed hands between England and Scotland more than thirteen times, and was the location of a number of momentous events in the English-Scottish border wars. In the 13th century Berwick was one of the most wealthy trading ports in Scotland, providing an annual customs value of £2,190, equivalent to a quarter of all customs revenues received north of the border. A contemporary description of the town asserted that 'so populous and of such commercial importance that it might rightly be called another Alexandria, whose riches were the sea and the water its walls [3]. Events King Afonso I of Portugal and the Crusaders capture Lisbon from Muslims First written mention of Moscow. ... Events Portuguese fortify Fort Elmina on the Gold Coast Tizoc rules the Aztecs Diogo Cão, a Portuguese navigator, becomes the first European to sail up the Congo. ... Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country in northwest Europe, occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...

  • In 1174, Berwick was paid as part of the ransom of William I of Scotland to Henry II of England.
  • It was sold to Scotland by Richard I of England, to raise money to pay for Crusades
  • It was destroyed in 1216 by King John of England, who attended in person the razing of the town.
  • On March 30, 1296, Edward I stormed Berwick, sacking it with much bloodshed. He slaughtered almost everyone who resided in the town, even if they fled to the churches.
  • Edward I went to Berwick in August of 1296 to receive formal homage from some 2,000 Scottish nobles, after defeating the Scots at the Battle of Dunbar in April and forcing John I of Scotland (John Balliol) to abdicate at Kincardine Castle in July. (The first town walls were built during the reign of Edward I.
  • One of the arms of William Wallace was displayed at Berwick after his execution and quartering on August 5, 1305.
  • In 1314 Edward II of England mustered 25,000 men at Berwick, who later fought in (and lost) the Battle of Bannockburn.
  • On the 1 April 1318, it was captured by the Scottish; Berwick Castle was also taken after a three-month siege.
  • The English retook Berwick some time shortly after the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333
  • In October 1357, a treaty was signed at Berwick by which the Scottish estates undertook to pay 100,000 marks as a ransom for David II of Scotland, who had been taken prisoner at the Battle of Neville's Cross on October 17, 1346.
  • In 1482 the town was claimed for England by Richard III, although not officially merged into England. It has been administered by England since this date.
  • During the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England, vast sums - one source reports "£128,648, the most expensive undertaking of the Elizabethan period" [4] - were spent on its fortifications, in a new Italian style, designed both to withstand artillery and to facilitate its use from within the fortifications. Although most of Berwick Castle was demolished in the nineteenth century to make way for the railway, the military barracks remain, as do the town's rampart walls - one of the finest remaining examples of its type in the country.
  • In 1603, Berwick was the first English town to greet James VI of Scotland on his way to being crowned James I of England.
  • In 1639 the army of Charles I of England faced that of General Alexander Leslie at Berwick in the Bishops' Wars, which were concerned with bringing the Presbyterian Church of Scotland under Charles' control. The two sides did not fight, but negotiated a settlement, "the Pacification of Berwick" in June under which the King agreed that all disputed questions should be referred to another General Assembly or to the Scottish Parliament.
  • In 1746 the Wales and Berwick act was passed, under the terms of which it was deemed that whenever legislation referred to England, this encompassed Berwick. Berwick remained a county in its own right however, and was not included in Northumberland for Parliamentary purposes until 1885.
  • The Reform Act 1832, which dealt in large part with the problem of rotten boroughs, reduced the number of MPs returned by the town from two to one.

In contemporary times, there continues to be demand for Berwick's return to Scotland. [5] William I (William the Lion, William Leo, William Dunkeld or William Canmore), (1142/1143 - December 4, 1214) reigned as King of Scotland from 1165 to 1214. ... Henry II of England, depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry II (March 5, 1133 – July 6, 1189), ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... This article is about historical Crusades . ... Events Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... John (December 24, 1166–October 18/19, 1216) reigned as King of England from April 6, 1199, until his death. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in Leap years). ... Events April 27 - Battle of Dunbar: The Scots are defeated by Edward I of England. ... King Edward I of England (June 17, 1239 – July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch frame and the Hammer of the Scots (his tombstone, in Latin, read, Hic est Edwardvs Primus Scottorum Malleus, Here lies Edward I, Hammer of the Scots), achieved fame... There were two Battles of Dunbar: Battle of Dunbar (1296), in the Wars of Scottish Independence. ... John Balliol and his wife. ... Sir William Wallace (c. ... August 5 is the 217th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (218th in leap years), with 148 days remaining. ... Events Wenceslas III becomes king of Bohemia The Papacy removed to France following riots in the Papal State. ... Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – October, 1327), of Caernarvon, was king of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... The Battle of Bannockburn (June 23, 1314 - June 24, 1314) was a significant Scottish victory in the Wars of Scottish Independence. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... Events Pope John XXII declares the doctrines of the Franciscans advocating ecclesiastical poverty erroneous End of the reign of Emperor Hanazono of Japan Emperor Go-Daigo ascends to the throne of Japan Births Pope Urban VI Margarete Maultasch, Countess of Tyrol Deaths Categories: 1318 ... Battle of Halidon Hill (July 19, 1333) was the last of the Wars of Scottish Independence, ending that forty year struggle. ... Events End of the Kamakura period and beginning of the Kemmu restoration in Japan. ... [[ == == ===Events= July 9 - Charles Bridge in Prague was founded == == ==]] Births Vincent Ferrer April 11 - King John I of Portugal Deaths May 28 - King Afonso IV of Portugal Categories: 1357 ... David II (March 5, 1324-February 22, 1371) king of Scotland, son of King Robert the Bruce by his second wife, Elizabeth de Burgh (d. ... As a consequence of the French armys defeat at the Battle of Crécy, during the Hundred Years War, King Philip VI of France appealed to his friend and ally King David II of Scotland to come to his aid by launching an attack on Northern England. ... October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Foundation of the University of Valladolid Foundation of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge August 26 Battle of Crecy after which Edward the Black Prince honored the bravery of John I, Count of Luxemburg and King of Bohemia also known as John the BLIND! who was killed in the fighting... Events Portuguese fortify Fort Elmina on the Gold Coast Tizoc rules the Aztecs Diogo Cão, a Portuguese navigator, becomes the first European to sail up the Congo. ... King Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was the King of England from 1483 until his death and the last king from the House of York. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Events March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James VI of Scotland, uniting the crowns of Scotland and England April 28 – Funeral of Elizabeth I of England in Westminster Abbey July 17 or July 19 - Sir Walter Raleigh arrested for treason. ... James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... Charles I (19 November 1600–30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 27 March 1625, until his death. ... Alexander Leslie, 1st Earl of Leven, Lord Balgonie, (appr. ... The Bishops Wars, a series of armed encounters and defiances between England and Scotland in 1639 and 1640, were part of the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Church of Scotland is the national (established) church in Scotland. ... Events January 8 - Bonnie Prince Charlie occupies Stirling April 16 - Battle of Culloden brings an end to the Jacobite Risings October 22 - The College of New Jersey is founded (it becomes Princeton University in 1896) October 28 - An earthquake demolishes Lima and Callao, in Peru Catharine de Ricci (born 1522... The Wales and Berwick Act 1746 was an act of Parliament explicitly expressing that all future laws applying to England would likewise also be applicable to Wales and Berwick unless the body of the law explicitly stated otherwise. ... For other places with this name, see Northumberland Northumberland is a county in England, on the border with Scotland. ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The British Reform Act of 1832 (2 & 3 Will. ... The term rotten borough (or pocket borough, as they were seen as being in the pocket of a patron) refers to a parliamentary borough or constituency in the Kingdom of England (pre-1707), the Kingdom of Great Britain (1707-1801), the Kingdom of Ireland (1536-1801) and the United Kingdom... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ...


At war with Russia?

Various proclamations promulgated before 1885 referred to "England, Scotland and the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed". One such was the declaration of war against Russia in 1853, which Queen Victoria signed as "Victoria, Queen of Great Britain, Ireland, Berwick-upon-Tweed and all British Dominions". But when the Treaty of Paris (1856) was signed to conclude the war, "Berwick-upon-Tweed" was missed out. Was it still at war with Russia or not? In 1966 a Soviet official waited upon the Mayor of Berwick, Councillor Robert Knox, and a peace treaty was formally signed. Mr Knox is reputed to have said "Please tell the Russian people that they can sleep peacefully in their beds." 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Her Majesty Queen Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria Wettin, née Hanover) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom from 20 June 1837, and Empress of India from 1876 until her death. ... The Treaty of Paris of 1856 settled the Crimean War between Russia and Ottoman Empire and its allies France and Britain. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ...


Places of interest

  • Berwick Barracks, now maintained by English Heritage, and built between 1717 and 1721, the design attributed to Vanbrugh.
  • The ramparts or defensive wall around the town centre
  • The Old Bridge, 15 spans of sandstone arch bridge measuring 1,164 feet in length, built between 1610 and 1624, at a cost of £15,000. The bridge continues to serve road traffic in one direction only. The bridge was on the main route from London to Edinburgh and was ordered by James I of England.
  • The Royal Border Bridge, designed and built under the supervision of Robert Stephenson between 1847 and opened by Queen Victoria in 1850 at a cost of cost £253,000, is a railway viaduct with 28 arches standing 126 feet above and carrying the East Coast Main Line for 720 yards across the River Tweed.
  • The recently refurbished Royal Tweed Bridge, built in 1925 and in its time having the longest concrete span in the country at 361 feet, and originally designed to carry the A1 road traffic across the Tweed; the town has now a road bypass to the west. In the early 2000s, its fabric was renovated, the road and pavement layout amended, and new street lighting was added.
  • The Union Bridge (five miles upstream), the world's oldest suspension bridge.
  • The Guildhall, built in the 1750 in a Classical style, and formerly housing the town's prison on its top floor.

English Heritage is a United Kingdom government body with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance March 2 — Dancer John Weaver performs in the first ballet in Britain shown in Drury Lane The Loves of Mars and Venus March 31 - Bishop Benjamin Hoadly, acting on the advice of King George begins the Bangorian Controversy by saying... Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias... Sir John Vanbrugh in Godfrey Knellers Kit-cat portrait, considered one of Knellers finest portraits. ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ... Berwick Bridge, also known as the Old Bridge, spans the River Tweed in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland. ... Red Sandstone in Wyoming Sandstone is an arenaceous sedimentary rock composed mainly of feldspar and quartz and varies in colour (in a similar way to sand), through grey, yellow, red, and white. ... Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... The pound sterling, which strictly speaking refers to basic currency unit of sterling, now the pound, can generally refer to the currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben Tower Bridge at night A red double-decker bus crosses Piccadilly Circus. ... Edinburghs location in Scotland Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ... James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... Royal Border Bridge spans the River Tweed between Berwick-upon-Tweed and Tweedmouth in Northumberland. ... For the lighthouse engineer see Robert Stevenson Statue of Robert Stephenson at Euston Station, London Robert Stephenson FRS (October 16, 1803 - October 12, 1859) was an English civil engineer. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Her Majesty Queen Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria Wettin, née Hanover) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom from 20 June 1837, and Empress of India from 1876 until her death. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Torontos Bloor Street Viaduct bridges the Don valley; road traffic uses the upper deck, rail traffic uses the lower deck. ... The East Coast Main Line viaduct at Durham. ... The Royal Tweed Bridge is a 1920s road bridge in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, that carries Pudding Lane across the River Tweed. ... 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sign at Junction 1 of the A1(M) at South Mimms in Hertfordshire The A1, at 409 miles (658 km) long, is the longest numbered British road. ... Saddam Hussein shortly after his capture Major controversy over U.S. presidential election, 2000 September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on New Yorks World Trade Center and Virginias Pentagon killing almost 3000 people. ... Viewed from Scotland The Union Bridge, also called the Chain Bridge spans the River Tweed at Grid reference NT934510, between Horncliffe, Northumberland, England and Fishwick, Berwickshire (now part of Scottish Borders). ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex to...

People

John Knox (1513 or 1514? to 1572) was a Scottish religious reformer who founded the Presbyterian Church of Scotland. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Church of Scotland is the national (established) church in Scotland. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Mason Jackson (c. ... Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Alexander Knox (January 16, 1907 _ April 25, 1995) was a Canadian actor. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lawrence Stephen Lowry (November 1, 1887 - February 23, 1976) was an English artist born in Rusholme, Manchester. ... Wendy Wood (1892-1981) was a well-known Scottish nationalist, writer, artist and founder of the Scottish Patriots. ... Tweed is a type of fabric using the twill weave. ... Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? was a HIT British sitcom shown between January 1973 and December 1974, the sequel to The Likely Lads. ...

External links

  • Explore Berwick
  • Images of the 'Berwick Bounds' English-Scottish border
  • A tale of one town - 2004 BBC news story concerned with the ongoing debate about whether Berwick should be part of England or Scotland.


The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) was formed in 1927 by means of a royal charter. ...

River Tweed, UK (Others in NSW and NZ) edit
Administrative areas: Scottish Borders, Scotland | Northumberland, England | Flows into: North Sea

Towns (upstream to downstream): Peebles | Galashiels | Melrose | St. Boswells | Kelso | Coldstream | Berwick-upon-Tweed
The River Tweed at Abbotsford, near Melrose The River Tweed at Coldstream The River Tweed (156 kilometres or 97 miles long) flows primarily through the Borders region of Scotland. ... The Tweed River is a short river on the north coast of New South Wales, Australia. ... Scottish Borders (Na Crìochan na h-Alba in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country in northwest Europe, occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain. ... For other places with this name, see Northumberland Northumberland is a county in England, on the border with Scotland. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... Old Parish Church, Peebles Location within the British Isles. ... Galashiels is a burgh in the Scottish Borders, on the Gala Water river. ... Melrose is a small, historic town on the Scottish Borders. ... The centre of Kelso with its cobbled square. ... Coldstream is a burgh in the Scottish Borders. ...


Major tributaries (upstream to downstream by confluence): Cor Water | Talla Water | Holms Water | Lyne Water | Manor Water
Quair Water | Leithen Water | Cadden Water | River Ettrick | Gala Water | River Teviot | River Till | Whiteadder Water
A confluence is the merger or meeting of two or more objects (or subjects) that seem to inseparably bind their respective forces or attributes into a point of junction. ... Leithen Water runs through the town of Innerleithen and subsequently feeds the River Tweed. ... The River Ettrick flows through the towns of Ettrick, Ettrickbridge and Selkirk in the Scottish Borders. ... A river of the Scottish Borders, the River Teviot rises in the western foothills of Comb Hill on the border of Dumfries and Galloway. ... The River Till in Northumberland is the only English tributary of the River Tweed. ...


Major bridges (upstream to downstream): Leaderfoot Viaduct | Dryburgh Bridge | Mertoun Bridge | Kelso Bridge | Coldstream Bridge
Ladykirk and Norham Bridge | Union Bridge | A1 bridge, River Tweed | Royal Border Bridge | Royal Tweed Bridge | Berwick Bridge Dryburgh Suspension Bridge, near Dryburgh Abbey, Scottish Borders, is a 19th century suspension bridge between the villages of Dryburgh and St. ... Coldstream Bridge, linking Coldstream, Scottish Borders with Cornhill, Northumberland, is an 18th century Grade II* listed bridge between England and Scotland, across the River Tweed. ... Ladykirk and Norham Bridge, which connects Ladykirk in the Scottish Borders with Norham in Northumberland, is a Grade II listed bridge that spans the River Tweed. ... Viewed from Scotland The Union Bridge, also called the Chain Bridge spans the River Tweed at Grid reference NT934510, between Horncliffe, Northumberland, England and Fishwick, Berwickshire (now part of Scottish Borders). ... Royal Border Bridge spans the River Tweed between Berwick-upon-Tweed and Tweedmouth in Northumberland. ... The Royal Tweed Bridge is a 1920s road bridge in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, that carries Pudding Lane across the River Tweed. ... Berwick Bridge, also known as the Old Bridge, spans the River Tweed in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland. ...

Longest UK rivers: 1. Severn 2. Thames 3. Trent 4. Aire 5. Great Ouse 6. Wye 7. Tay 8. Spey 9. Nene 10. Clyde 11. Tweed 12. Eden

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m