FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Bernie Sanders
Bernie Sanders


Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 4, 2007
Serving with Patrick Leahy
Preceded by Jim Jeffords
Succeeded by Incumbent (2013)

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's At-Large district
In office
January 3, 1991January 3, 2007
Preceded by Peter P. Smith
Succeeded by Peter Welch

Born September 8, 1941 (1941-09-08) (age 65)
New York City, New York
Political party Independent
Caucuses with the Democratic Party
Spouse Jane O'Meara
Alma mater University of Chicago
Religion Jewish

Bernard "Bernie" Sanders (born September 8, 1941) is the current big willy floppah junior United States Senator from big blob of brown poo Vermont. Sanders was elected on November 7, 2006, and is presently a member of the 110th United States Congress. Before becoming Senator, Sanders represented Vermont's at-large district in the United States House of Representatives for 15 years. He plows his meat rod into children worldwide, and i wank untill i bleed winky whiteout. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 473 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (682 × 864 pixel, file size: 98 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Patrick Joseph Leahy (born March 31, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Vermont. ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934 in Rutland, Vermont) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Peter Plympton Smith, the son of prominent banker and state senator Frederick P. Smith, was born October 31, 1945. ... For the British television actor, see Peter Welch (actor). ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... Senior Senator and Junior Senator are terms commonly used in the media to describe U.S. Senators. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ... The U.S. state of Vermont is represented in the U.S. House of Representatives by a single at-large congressional district since the 1930 census, when Vermont lost its second seat in the House of Representatives. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ...


Sanders is a democratic socialist, but because he does not belong to a formal political party he appears as an independent on the ballot. Sanders caucuses with the Democratic Party and is counted as a Democrat for the purposes of committee assignments. He was the only independent member of the House during much of his service there and is one of two independent Senators in the 110th Congress, along with Joe Lieberman. Sanders is the first self-described socialist to be elected to the U.S. Senate.[1] Sanders left the House in order to run in the 2006 election for the Senate seat being vacated by the retiring Jim Jeffords and won the election with 65% of the vote.[2] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Congressional caucus is a group of members of the United States Congress which meets to pursue common legislative objectives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ... The Vermont Senate election of 2006 will be held on November 7, 2006. ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934 in Rutland, Vermont) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ...

Contents

Early life

Sanders, the son of Jewish-Polish immigrants to the United States was born in Brooklyn. He graduated from James Madison High School in Brooklyn and later attended the University of Chicago, graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1964. [3] Sanders moved to Vermont in 1964. He worked as a carpenter and journalist.[3] The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... 2000 Census Population Ancestry Map Immigration to the United States of America is the movement of non-residents to the United States, and has been a major source of population growth and cultural change throughout much of the American history even though the foreign born have never been more than... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... James Madison High School is a public high school located at 3787 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, and educates grades 9 through 12. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ...


Early political career

Sanders' political career began in 1971, when he joined the anti-Vietnam War Liberty Union Party in Vermont. Sanders was an unsuccessful Liberty Union candidate for election to the Senate in 1972 and 1974, as well as for governor of Vermont in 1972, 1976 and 1986. In his initial campaign Sanders received only two percent of the vote, but in subsequent races for Senate and Governor were slightly more successful, with Sanders' highest vote tally being six percent. Opposition to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War began slowly and in small numbers in 1964 on various college campuses in the United States. ... The Liberty Union Party of Vermont defines itself as a nonviolent socialist party. ...


In 1977, Sanders resigned from the Liberty Union party and worked as a writer and the director of the non-profit American People's Historical Society. In 1981, at the suggestion of his friend Richard Sugarman, a religion professor at the University of Vermont, Sanders ran for mayor of Burlington and defeated six-term Democratic incumbent Gordon Paquette by 12 votes, in a four-way contest. (An independent candidate, Richard Bove, split the Democratic vote after losing the primary to Paquette). A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... UVM redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Increasingly popular because of his successful revitalization of Burlington's downtown area, Sanders won three more terms, defeating both Democratic and Republican candidates. In his last run for mayor, in 1987, he defeated a candidate endorsed by both major parties. The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...


During his first term, supporters of Sanders formed the Progressive Coalition, forerunner of the Vermont Progressive Party. The Progressives never held more than six seats on the 13-member city council, but held enough votes to keep the council from overriding Sanders's vetoes. Under Sanders, Burlington became the first city in the country to fund community-trust housing. His administration also sued the local cable television provider and won considerably reduced rates and a substantial cash settlement. The Vermont Progressive Party is perhaps the United States most consistently successful current third party, although it is active in only one state. ... Coaxial cable is often used to transmit cable television into the house. ...


Sanders ran for governor for the third time in 1986. He finished third with 14.5 percent of the vote, which was enough to deny incumbent Democrat Madeleine Kunin a majority; she was elected by the state legislature. In 1988, when six-term incumbent Representative Jim Jeffords made a successful run for the Senate, Sanders ran for Jefford's vacated seat in the House. Sanders narrowly lost to Peter P. Smith, the former lieutenant governor and the 1986 Republican candidate for governor. Sanders again ran against Smith in 1990. In one of the biggest upsets in recent political history, he took 56 percent of the vote and defeated Smith by 16 points, becoming the first independent member of the House since 1950. Categories: Stub | 1933 births | Governors of Vermont | Foreign-born US political figures ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934 in Rutland, Vermont) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ... Peter Plympton Smith, the son of prominent banker and state senator Frederick P. Smith, was born October 31, 1945. ...


Sanders taught at Harvard University in 1989 and Hamilton College in 1991. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Hamilton College is a private, independent, highly selective liberal arts college located in Clinton, New York. ...


In the House of Representatives

Sanders in 2006

Although relations between Sanders and House Democratic leadership have not always been smooth, the Democrats have not actively campaigned against Sanders since his first run for Congress. While Democratic candidates ran against him in every election except 1994 (when Sanders managed to win the Democrats' endorsement), they received little financial support. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ...


Sanders was reelected six times and was the longest-serving independent member of the House. Despite his independent status, he only faced one difficult contest. That came in 1994, in the midst of the Republican Revolution that swept Republicans into control of the Congress. In a year when many marginal seats fell to Republicans, Sanders managed a narrow three-point victory. In every other election, he has won at least 55 percent of the vote. In his last congressional campaign, in 2004, Sanders took 69 percent to Republican Greg Parke's 24 percent and Democrat Larry Drown's 7 percent. The Republican Revolution refers to the success of Republican Party in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate. ...


Sanders' lifetime legislative score from the AFL-CIO is 100 percent. As of 2006, he has a grade of "C-" from the National Rifle Association (NRA). Sanders voted against the Brady Bill and in favor of a NRA-supported bill to restrict lawsuits against gun manufacturers in 2005. [4] Sanders voted to abolish the so-called "marriage penalty" and also for a bill that sought to ban human cloning. Sanders has endorsed every Democratic candidate for president of the United States since 1992. Sanders is a co-founder of the House Progressive Caucus and chaired the grouping of mostly left-wing Democrats for its first eight years. American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, commonly AFL-CIO, is a national trade union center, the largest federation of unions in the United States, made up of 54 national and international unions (including Canadian), together representing more than 10 million workers. ... This article concerns the National Rifle Association of the USA. For the UK organisation, see National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a non-profit group for the promotion of marksmanship, firearm safety, and the protection of hunting and personal protection firearm rights... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993. ... Although genes are recognized as influencing behavior and cognition, genetically identical does not mean altogether identical; identical twins, despite being natural human clones with identical DNA, are separate people, with separate experiences and not altogether overlapping personalities. ... The presidential seal is a well-known symbol of the presidency. ... The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) the single largest caucus in the United States House of Representatives, and works together to advance progressive issues and causes. ... “Leftism” redirects here. ...


Sanders voted against both resolutions authorizing the use of force against Iraq in 1991 and 2002 and opposed the 2003 invasion of Iraq. He later joined almost all of his colleagues in voting for a non-binding resolution expressing support for U.S. troops at the outset of the invasion, although he gave a floor speech blasting the partisan nature of the resolution and the Bush administration's actions in the run-up to the war. In relation to the leak investigation involving Valerie Plame, on April 7, 2006, Sanders said, "The revelation that the president authorized the release of classified information in order to discredit an Iraq war critic should tell every member of Congress that the time is now for a serious investigation of how we got into the war in Iraq, and why Congress can no longer act as a rubber stamp for the president." [5] Sanders supports universal health care and opposes what he terms "unfettered" free trade [1], which he argues deprives American workers of their jobs while exploiting foreign workers in sweatshop factories. Iraq Resolution and Iraq War Resolution are popular names for the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public law 107-243, 116 Stat. ... The subject of this article is the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... A non-binding resolution is a written motion adopted by a deliberative body that can not progress in to a law. ... Valerie E. Wilson (born Valerie Elise Plame April 19, 1963, in Anchorage, Alaska) is a former United States Central Intelligence Agency officer who held non-official cover (NOC) status prior to the public disclosure of her classified covert CIA identity in a syndicated American newspaper column. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Universal health care is a state in which all residents of a geographic or political entity have access to most types of health care. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Sweatshop is a pejorative term used to describe a manufacturing facility where working conditions fall short of contemporary human-rights standards. ...


An amendment he offered in June 2005 to limit provisions giving the government power to obtain individuals' library and book-buying records passed the House by a bipartisan majority, but was removed on November 4 of that year by House-Senate negotiators, and never became law.[6] Sanders followed this vote on November 5, 2005, by voting against the Online Freedom of Speech Act, which would have exempted the Internet from the restrictions of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (McCain-Feingold Bill). is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (BCRA) is U.S. Congressional legislation which regulates the financing of political campaigns. ...


In March 2006, Sanders stated it would be impractical, given the "reality that the Republicans control the House and the Senate", to impeach George W. Bush after a series of resolutions calling for him to bring articles of impeachment against the president passed in various towns in Vermont. Still, Sanders makes no secret of his opposition to the George W. Bush administration, which he has regularly attacked for cuts in social programs he supports. [7][8][9] Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body formally levels charges against a high official of government. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The articles of impeachment are the set of charges drafted against a public official to initiate the impeachment process. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ...


Sanders has also criticized Alan Greenspan. In June 2003, during a question-and-answer discussion with then-Federal Reserve chairman, Sanders told Greenspan that he was concerned that Greenspan "was way out of touch" and "that you see your major function in your position as the need to represent the wealthy and large corporations."[10] Alan Greenspan (born March 6, 1926) is an American economist and was Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ...


Republicans have attacked Sanders as "an ineffective extremist" for passing only one law and fifteen amendments in his eight terms in the House.[11][12] Sanders responded by saying that he had passed "the most floor amendments of any member of the House since 1996."[13] Democratic National Committee chair Howard Dean has stated that "Bernie Sanders votes with the Democrats 98 percent of the time."[14] This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ...


Senate campaign

Sanders had mentioned on several occasions that he would run for the Senate if Jeffords (with whom he has a longstanding friendship) were ever to retire, and entered the race on April 21, 2005, following Jeffords's announcement that he would not seek a fourth term. New York Senator Chuck Schumer, chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, endorsed Sanders; Schumer's backing was critical, as it meant that any Democrat running against Sanders could not expect to receive any significant financial help on a national level. Sanders was also endorsed by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, and Democratic National Committee chairman and former Vermont governor Howard Dean. Dean said in May 2005 that he considered Sanders an ally who voted with House Democrats. Senator Barack Obama also campaigned for Sanders in Vermont. Sanders entered into an agreement with the Democratic Party to be listed in their primary but to decline the nomination should he win, which he did easily.[15] The Vermont Senate election of 2006 will be held on November 7, 2006. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NY redirects here. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is currently the senior U.S. Senator from the state of New York, serving since 1999. ... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two United States Senators... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Barack Hussein Obama (born August 4, 1961) is the junior United States Senator from Illinois and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


Sanders consistently led his Republican challenger, businessman Richard Tarrant, by wide margins in polling. In the most expensive political campaign in Vermont's history,[16] Sanders defeated Tarrant by an approximately 2-to-1 margin in the 2006 midterm election. Many national media outlets (including CNN) projected Sanders the winner before any returns came in. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Richard Edward Tarrant, (born August 6, 1942 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American businessman, millionaire, and politician. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ...


Sanders is only the third Senator from Vermont to caucus with the Democrats — following Jeffords and Patrick Leahy. Sanders made a deal with the Democratic leadership similar to the one Jeffords made after Jeffords became an independent. In exchange for the committee seats that would be available to him as a Democrat, Sanders will vote with the Democrats on all procedural matters unless he asks permission of Majority Whip Richard Durbin. However, such a request is almost never made and is almost never granted. He is free to vote as he pleases on policy matters, but almost always votes with the Democrats. Patrick Joseph Leahy (born March 31, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Vermont. ... The U.S. Senate Majority Whip is the second ranking member of the United States Senate. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ...


Senate career

In his first Senate term, Sanders serves on the committees on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions; Budget, Environment and Public Works; Veterans' Affairs; and Energy and Natural Resources. The United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) has jurisdiction over matters relating to health, education, labor, and pensions. ... The United States Senate Committee on Budget was established in 1974 by the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act. ... The United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works is responsible for dealing with matters related to the environment and infrastructure. ... The United States Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs is responsible for dealing with matters related to veterans. ... The United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources has jurisdiction over matters related to energy and nuclear waste policy, territorial policy, native Hawaiian matters, and public lands. ...


The Global Warming Pollution Reduction Act of 2007 was introduced by Senators Sanders and Barbara Boxer (D-CA) on January 15, 2007. The measure would provide funding for R&D on geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide, set emissions standards for new vehicles and a renewable fuels requirement for gasoline beginning in 2016, establish energy efficiency and renewable portfolio standards beginning in 2008 and low-carbon electric generation standards beginning in 2016 for electric utilities, and require periodic evaluations by the National Academy of Sciences to determine whether emissions targets are adequate.[17] The Global Warming Pollution Reduction Act of 2007 (S. 309) was proposed in the 110th United States Congress by Senators Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Barbara Boxer (D-CA) on January 15, 2007. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... C02 sequestration is the capture, extraction, separation, collection, etc, of carbon dioxide and a means for its storage or use. ... Emissions trading (or cap and trade) is an administrative approach used to control pollution by providing economic incentives for achieving reductions in the emissions of pollutants. ...


Personal life and trivia

  • Bernie's brother, Larry Sanders, is a Green Party politician in the county of Oxfordshire in England. His nephew, Jacob, is a former Oxford city councillor for the Greens.
  • Sanders has been a longtime friend of free-market economist Walter Block.
  • Bernie Sanders has regular guest appearances on the Thom Hartmann radio program for the Friday segment "Brunch with Bernie."
  • He is married to Jane O'Meara, president of Burlington College, and has one son, Levi Sanders, from a previous marriage. [2]
  • Bernie played the part of Rabbi Manny Shevitz in the 2001 comedy My X-Girlfriend's Wedding Reception starring singer and Broadway performer Deborah Gibson.
  • Bernie is one of three sitting US Senators that went to James Madison High School in Brooklyn.
  • Sanders is one of four sitting US Senators who both are Jewish and were raised in Brooklyn, NY. The others are Charles Schumer, Barbara Boxer, and Norm Coleman.
  • At one point before becoming a member of the US House of Representatives, Bernie's roommate was Richard I. Sugarman, a professor at the University of Vermont. Incredibly, the only other Independent currently serving in the US Senate, Joe Lieberman (I-CT) had also been a roommate of Prof. Sugarman's at one point in the 1960s.

The Larry Sanders Show is the name of a satirical situation comedy television series that originally screened from 1992 and 1998 on the HBO cable television network in the USA. It starred former standup comedian Garry Shandling as the shows vain, self-obsessed, neurotic host, Larry Sanders. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... Jacob Sanders Jacob Edward (Jake) Sanders was the prospective parliamentary candidate in the Oxford East constituency for the Green Party of England and Wales in the UK general election, 2005. ... Walter Block Walter Block (born 1941) is a leading free market economist and anarcho-capitalist associated with the Austrian School. ... Thom Hartmann Thom Hartmann (b. ... Burlington College is a private liberal arts college located in Burlington, Vermont. ... Deborah Ann Debbie Gibson (born August 31, 1970), is an American singer-songwriter who was a teen pop icon. ... James Madison High School is a public high school located at 3787 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, and educates grades 9 through 12. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is a Jewish American politician. ... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... Norman Bertram Norm Coleman, Jr. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... UVM redirects here. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ...

References

  1. ^ Borger, Julian. "Democrats pile pressure on Bush as glitches hit US poll", Guardian, 2006-11-08. Retrieved on 2006-11-08. 
  2. ^ U.S. Senate / Vermont. America Votes 2006. CNN. Retrieved on 2006-11-09.
  3. ^ a b Leibovich, Mark (2007-01-21). The Socialist Senator. The New York Times Magazine. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-18.
  4. ^ Final Vote Results for Roll Call 534. Office of the clerk, US House of Representatives. Retrieved on 2007-07-18.
  5. ^ Yost, Pete (2006-04-07). Libby: Bush, Cheney OK’d leak campaign. The Associated Press. Retrieved on 2007-07-18.
  6. ^ https://lists.wisc.edu/read/messages?id=495733
  7. ^ http://bernie.house.gov/documents/releases/20040520150051.asp]
  8. ^ http://www.tpmcafe.com/story/2005/6/24/155932/073
  9. ^ http://bernie.house.gov/multimedia/video.asp?video='4791'
  10. ^ http://bernie.house.gov/statements/20030716135257.asp
  11. ^ http://www.gopsenators.com/newsdesk/document.aspx?ID=238
  12. ^ http://www.nrsc.org/newsdesk/document.aspx?ID=214
  13. ^ http://bernie.org/?p=53
  14. ^ http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1408482/posts
  15. ^ "U.S. Senate: Tarrant-Sanders duel set", Burlington Free Press, 2006-09-12. Retrieved on 2006-11-08. 
  16. ^ Ring, Wilson. "Sanders, Welch are winners in Vermont", Boston Globe, Associated Press, 2006-11-07. Retrieved on 2007-01-25. 
  17. ^ Climate Change Bills of the 110th Congress Environmental Defense, May 29, 2007.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Official sites

Resources

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ...

Interviews

Articles by Sanders

Articles about Sanders

Political offices
Preceded by
Gordon Paquette
Mayor of Burlington
1981–1989
Succeeded by
Peter Clavelle
Preceded by
Peter P. Smith
United States Representative for the At Large Congressional District of Vermont
19912007
Succeeded by
Peter Welch
Preceded by
James Jeffords
United States Senator (Class 1) from Vermont
January 4, 2007–
Served alongside: Patrick Leahy
Succeeded by
Incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Students and Leaders: Congressman Bernie Sanders (636 words)
Bernie and Jane are the very proud parents of four children.
Bernie was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1941, the son of a paint salesman who immigrated to this country as a young man. His mother raised her two sons in a small apartment while his father earned a steady but limited income.
Sanders' family circumstances, in which money was often tight, heavily influenced his understanding about the financial difficulties that face many working class families.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m