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Encyclopedia > Beren
Character from Tolkien's Legendarium
Name Beren
Other names Erchamion (Empty-handed), Camlost (One-handed)
Race Men
Culture Edain, House of Bëor
Gender Male
Realm Dorthonion, Ossiriand
 
Life span Y.S. 443 - Y.S. 503
Weapon Dagmor
Middle-earth Portal

Beren is a fictional character, from J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy-world Middle-earth. He was a the son of Barahir and Emeldir, a Man of the royal House of Bëor of Dorthonion. His romance with the Elf Lúthien is one of the great stories of the Elder Days. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) is best known as the author of The Hobbit and its sequel The Lord of the Rings. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... A name is a verbal label for a thing, person, place, product (as in a brand name) and even an idea or concept, normally used to distinguish one from another. ... Fantasy fiction tends to draw upon a common set of creatures that are easily recognizable to fans of the fantastic genre and have some pre-determined traits. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... The word culture, from the Latin colo, -ere, with its root meaning to cultivate, generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Edain were those Men (humans) who made their way into Beleriand in the First Age, and were friendly to the Elves. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Bëor was the oldest of the Three Houses of Men that had allied with the Elves in the First Age. ... Gender describes a classification using masculinity and femininity. ... The shield and spear of the Roman God Mars are often used to represent the male sex In heterogamous species, male is the sex of an organism, or of a part of an organism, which typically produces smaller, mobile gametes (spermatozoa) that are able to fertilise female gametes (ova). ... A Realm is a primary synonym for a world usually other than our own. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Dorthonion (Land of Pines), later Taur-nu-Fuin, was a highland region of the First Age, lying immediately to the north of Beleriand, and south of the plains of Ard-galen (later Anfauglith) that bordered Morgoths stronghold of Thangorodrim. ... Life span is one of the most important parameters of any living organism. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Years of the Sun are the last of the three great time-periods of Arda, together with the Years of the Lamps and the Years of the Trees. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Years of the Sun are the last of the three great time-periods of Arda, together with the Years of the Lamps and the Years of the Trees. ... The bayonet, still used in war as both knife and spearpoint. ... This is a list of weaponry directly taken from or based on J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Image File history File links Arda. ... A fictional character is any person who appears in a work of fiction. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) is best known as the author of The Hobbit and its sequel The Lord of the Rings. ... // For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Barahir was a Man of Middle-earth, heir to the House of Bëor in the First Age, son of Bregor, husband of Emeldir, and most famous as the father of Beren. ... Emeldir the Man-hearted is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Bëor was the oldest of the Three Houses of Men that had allied with the Elves in the First Age. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Dorthonion (Land of Pines), later Taur-nu-Fuin, was a highland region of the First Age, lying immediately to the north of Beleriand, and south of the plains of Ard-galen (later Anfauglith) that bordered Morgoths stronghold of Thangorodrim. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Lúthien Tinúviel is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Elder Days are the first Ages of Middle-earth. ...

Contents


Story

The Battle of Sudden Flame occurred during Beren's youth, bringing about the ruin of his kingdom. Thenceforward the young Beren lived with his father and ten loyal followers in the highlands of Dorthonion, at Tarn Aeluin, and the twelve of them performed many acts of bravery, to the great frustration of Morgoth, the Dark Lord of Angband. After the ruin of the Outlaws of Dorthonion, Beren was forced from the land of his birth by Sauron and Draugluin. He crossed into Doriath, where he saw and fell in love with Lúthien, princess of the Sindar and daughter of Thingol and Melian. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, the Dagor Bragollach was the fourth battle of the Wars of Beleriand, known as the Battle of Sudden Flame. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Tarn Aeluin is a clear blue mountain lake in the highlands of Dorthonion, said to have been hallowed by Melian. ... Morgoth Bauglir (also known as Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth Cycle. ... Dark Lord (also known as an Evil Overlord) is a name often used in fiction to talk about a powerful villain with evil henchmen, especially when pronouncing the real name is thought to bring bad luck. ... See Angband (game) for the computer game. ... For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Draugluin was the first werewolf. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Doriath was the land of the Sindar. ... Lúthien Tinúviel is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the works of J.R.R. Tolkien, the fictional Sindar (meaning Grey People, singular Sinda, although the later term was not generally used by Tolkien) are Elves of Telerin descent. ... Elu Thingol, a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien, was the King of Doriath and High King of the Sindar, More accurately Thingol is the Sindarin form of an epithet of Elu. ... Melian is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


Thingol haughtily refused to give Lúthien's hand in marriage. He said that he would only allow the marriage if Beren recovered a Silmaril from the Iron Crown of Morgoth. The task was intended to be impossible, but Beren and Lúthien, with the aid of Finrod of Nargothrond and Huan the Great Hound (both of whom died protecting Beren), braved many perils (even besting Sauron, then Morgoth's most powerful lieutenant) and captured a Silmaril. Beren then attempted to take another Silmaril from Morgoth's crown, but the tip of the dagger Angrist broke and cut Morgoth. As they escaped from Angband, the great wolf Carcharoth, whom Morgoth had bred, awoke. Beren held out the Silmaril, hoping that its radiance would avert the beast, but he was mistaken. Carcharoth bit off his hand swallowed it and the Silmaril (thus Beren was called Erchamion, One-hand), and proceeded to run rampant through Doriath. Lúthien and the unconscious Beren were rescued by the Eagles of Manwë. They eventually returned to Thingol, where Beren claimed that he was holding the Simaril in his hand; when he showed the king the stump of his arm, the king was moved to compassion for Beren (this is also where Beren got his epessi Erchamion (Empty-handed)). Beren participated in the hunting of Carcharoth, in which the beast was slain and the Silmaril recovered; the quest was accomplished, but Beren was mortally wounded. The Silmarils are fictional artifacts from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The Iron Crown is a fictional object from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Morgoth Bauglir (also known as Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth Cycle. ... The main part of this article relates to the version of Middle-earths history that is considered canon by most Tolkien fans who accept such labels (see: Middle-earth canon). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Nargothrond (Halls of Narog) is the stronghold built by Finrod Felagund, delved into the banks of the river Narog in Beleriand, and the lands to the north (the Talath Dirnen or Guarded Plain) ruled by the city. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Huan was a great Hound. ... Hounds have been used for hunting since ancient times, as suggested by this statue of the goddess Diana hunting. ... This is a list of weaponry directly taken from or based on J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... See Angband (game) for the computer game. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Carcharoth (IPA: ) was the greatest werewolf that had ever lived. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the eagles were immense flying birds that were sentient, and could speak. ... A fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth, Manwë Súlimo (from the Valarin Mânawenûz) is an Ainu, the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, brother of the Dark Lord Melkor (Morgoth), and King of Arda. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the epessë is one of the three categories of Elven names, equivalent to a nick-name or honorary title. ...


Lúthien's love for Beren was so strong that, hearing of his death, she laid down and died. Her soul went to the Halls of Mandos, where she moved Mandos to pity through her singing. Both she and Beren were restored to life, but both of them would die the death of Men, and go beyond the walls of Arda to a place unknown. Thus Beren and Lúthien lived again, and dwelt on Tol Galen in the middle of the river Adurant in Ossiriand. There they stayed apart from other mortals; Beren was involved with the events of the First Age only one further time, when he waylaid a group of Dwarves who had destroyed Doriath and stolen the Nauglamír in which the Silmaril was set. Mandos is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the name given to the Earth in a period of fictional prehistory, wherein the places mentioned in The Lord of the Rings and related material once existed. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Tol Galen is the green isle that lay between two arms of the River Adurant in the south of Ossiriand. ... In Tolkiens The Silimarillion, the river Adurant ran from southern Ered Luin into the river Gelion, marking the southern boundary of Ossiriand. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the First Age began with the awakening of the Elves, and ended with the final overthrow of Morgoth by the combined armies of Valinor and Beleriand. ... The Dwarves of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth are beings of short stature who all possess beards, and are often friendly with Hobbits although long suspicious of Elves. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Nauglamír or Necklace of the Dwarves is a piece of jewellry which appears at the end of the Narn i Chîn Húrin. ... The Silmarils are fictional artifacts from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...


Lúthien bore Beren a son, named Dior, Thingol's heir, considered to be one of the fairest beings to ever live, for in him flowed the blood of Men, Elves, Ainur. Through his descendants, the blood of Beren and of Lúthien was preserved among the Eldar and the Edain. Dior Eluchîl is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The Holy Ones (singular Ainu), the first beings created by Ilúvatar, the order of the Valar and Maiar, made before Eä. There was Eru, the One, who in Arda is called Ilúvatar; and he made first the Ainur, the Holy Ones, that were the offspring of his thought. ... Eldar Djangirov a jazz pianist. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Edain were those Men (humans) who made their way into Beleriand in the First Age, and were friendly to the Elves. ...


The name of Beren's sword was Dagmor. This is a list of weaponry directly taken from or based on J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


Evolution

The story of Beren and Lúthien, though mentioned only briefly in The Lord of the Rings, was a central part of the legendarium. Tolkien once referred to it as "the kernel of the mythology" (The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien, 165). He went on to say that it "arose from a small woodland glade filled with 'hemlocks'", which he visited while serving in the Humber Garrison in 1918 (during World War I). Cover design for the three volumes of The Lord of the Rings by Tolkien The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy book by the British author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... ... The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien (ISBN 0-618-05699-8) is a selection of J. R. R. Tolkiens letters published in 1981, edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and the biographer Humphrey Carpenter. ... The word Hemlock can refer to a number of things: Several poisonous plants in the Parsley family, Apiaceae (formerly Umbelliferae) are called hemlock: Poison hemlock is a common European plant, Conium maculatum; it contains the alkaloid Coniine. ... The Humber Forts are two large fortifications in the mouth of the river Humber in northern England: Haile Sand Fort and Bull Sands Fort. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First...


In the earliest versions of the legendarium as depicted in The Book of Lost Tales), Beren was a Gnome (a Ñoldorin Elf), son of Egnor (which might have been an early name for Aegnor). A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... The Book of Lost Tales is the title of the first two volumes of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyses the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Ñoldor (meaning those with knowledge) are of the second clan of the Elves, the Tatyar. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Aegnor is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


Inspiration

It is widely believed that the story and the characters were largely inspired by the young Tolkien's romance with Edith Bratt, his future wife, who may have actually danced for the author. [citation needed] Edith Bratt Edith Mary Tolkien née Bratt (January 21, 1889 – November 29, 1971) was the wife of writer J. R. R. Tolkien and the inspiration for his fictional character Lúthien. ...


The surname Tolkien derives from the German Toll-kühn meaning "Foolishly brave" [1]. The name Beren also means "brave" in Sindarin [citation needed]. and some believe that this is intentional by the author. Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


The tale of Beren and Luthien also shares an element with folktales such as the Welsh Culhwch and Olwen and others (found even in the Hebrew scriptures, in the story of King David) — namely, the disapproving parent who sets a seemingly impossible task (or tasks) for the suitor, which is then fulfilled. It may also have real-life parallels: some sources indicate that Edith's family disapproved of Tolkien originally, due to him being a Catholic. Culhwch and Olwen is a Welsh story that survives in only two manuscripts: a complete version in the Red Book of Hergest, ca. ... This page is about the Biblical king David. ...


When Tolkien's wife died, he had her headstone engraved EDITH MARY TOLKIEN Lúthien 1889 – 1971, and when he died two years later he left orders for his own name to be written JOHN RONALD REUEL TOLKIEN Beren 1892 – 1973


References in adaptations

The BBC Radio adaptation of The Lord of the Rings includes a scene from The Fellowship of the Ring in which Aragorn summarizes the story of Beren and Lúthien for Frodo Baggins and his companions. Frodo later comes to realise the connection between their story and that of Aragorn and Arwen. In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J.R.R. Tolkien. ... This aticle deals with Aragorn II. For his ancestor of the same name, see Aragorn I For other meanings, see Aragon (disambiguation) In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Aragorn II was the 16th Chieftain of the Dúnedain of the North (T.A. 2931 – F.A. 120) who was... Frodo Baggins (September 22, 2968 T.A. – ?) is the main character of J. R. R. Tolkiens monumental and mythological novel, The Lord of the Rings. ... Lady Arwen Undómiel (usually called Arwen Evenstar, Undómiel being the form in Quenya), (T.A. 241–F.A. 121), is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...


The special extended edition of Peter Jackson's movie version of The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) contains a brief mention of the story. During the journey from Bree to Rivendell Frodo hears Aragorn singing quietly to himself one night and asks who the woman is of whom he is singing. Aragorn replies that he is singing of Lúthien. When Frodo asks what happened to her Aragorn replies, "she died". This is true enough, and can be seen as a reflection of Aragorn's concern over Arwen's renunciation of immortality for his sake, but clearly fails to address the real context of the story or its similarity to that of Aragorn and Arwen. Peter Jackson Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961, Pukerua Bay) is a New Zealand-born filmmaker best-known as the director of the epic film trilogy The Lord of the Rings, which he, along with his long time partner, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens adapted from the novel by... Bree may refer to: Fiction: Bree (Middle-earth), a fictional village in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


Fans who hoped that a more complete explanation of the story might be given in The Two Towers (2002) or The Return of the King (2003) were disappointed.


The Line of Beren

 Bregor | -------------- | | Bregolas Barahir = Emeldir | | ---------------- | | | | Baragund Belegund Beren Erchamion = Lúthien | | | Morwen = Húrin Rían = Huor Dior = Nimloth | | | --------------- | -------------- | | | | | | | Túrin Lalaith Nienor Tuor = Idril | | | | | | | Eärendil = Elwing Eluréd Elurín | ------------------------------------- | | Elros Elrond = Celebrian | | ------------------------ ---------------- | | | | | Kings of Númenor Lords of Andúnië | | | | | | | Elendil | | | | | | | ------------------- | | | | | | | | Kings of Gondor Kings of Arnor | | | | | | | Kings of Arthedain | | | | | | | Chieftains of the Dúnedain | | | | | | | Aragorn = Arwen Elladan Elrohir | ---------------------- | | Eldarion Daughters | Kings of Gondor and Arnor 

Bregor is a fictional character in the Middle-earth universe of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Bëor was the oldest of the Three Houses of Men that had allied with the Elves in the First Age. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Barahir was a Man of Middle-earth, heir to the House of Bëor in the First Age, son of Bregor, husband of Emeldir, and most famous as the father of Beren. ... Emeldir the Man-hearted is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Baragund is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth universe. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Bëor was the oldest of the Three Houses of Men that had allied with the Elves in the First Age. ... Lúthien Tinúviel is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Morwen is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Húrin (439-c. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Rían was the daughter of Belegund of the House of Bëor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Huor (c. ... Dior Eluchîl is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In the fantasy world of J. R. R. Tolkien, Nimloth, Sindarin for white blossom, was the name of the White Tree of Númenor. ... In The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien, Túrin Turambar was a Man of Middle-earth, who became a tragic hero (or anti-hero) of the First Age in the tale called Narn i Chîn Húrin (The Tale of the Children of Húrin). Unpublished drafts of... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Urwen, better-known by her nick-name Lalaith (Laughter) was the second child of Húrin and Morwen and sister of Túrin. ... In Tolkiens Silmarillion, Nienor, also called Níniel Tear-Maiden, was Húrin and Morwens third child, the sister of Túrin. ... Tuor is a fictional character of J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Idril Celebrindal is the daughter of Turgon and Elenwë, wife of Tuor, and the mother of Eärendil the Mariner. ... For the Anglo-Saxon name, see Earendel. ... Elwing is a character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Eluréd and Elurín are fictional characters in the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. ... Eluréd and Elurín are fictional characters in the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. ... Elros Tar-Minyatur (F.A. 525 - S.A. 442, ruled 32 - 442 S.A.) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Spoiler warning: Elrond the Half-elven (F.A. 525 - ?) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by fantasy author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Celebr an is an Elf of Middle-earth, the daughter of Celeborn and Galadriel, wife of Elrond, and mother of Arwen, Elrohir and Elladan. ... The following is a list of the twenty-five Rulers of Númenor, a fictional realm in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe: After Ar-Pharazôn, who perished in the Downfall of Númenor, the direct line of Kings was broken. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Lords of Andúnië were the rulers of a noble house of Númenor. ... In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Elendil was a heroic figure. ... This is a list of Kings of Gondor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This is a list of kings of Arnor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth novels by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This is a list of kings of Arnor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth novels by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This is a list of Chieftains of the Dúnedain Rangers of Arnor (aka Rangers of the North) from the fictional universe of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This aticle deals with Aragorn II. For his ancestor of the same name, see Aragorn I For other meanings, see Aragon (disambiguation) In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Aragorn II was the 16th Chieftain of the Dúnedain of the North (T.A. 2931 – F.A. 120) who was... Lady Arwen Undómiel (usually called Arwen Evenstar, Undómiel being the form in Quenya), (T.A. 241–F.A. 121), is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Elladan and Elrohir are fictional characters in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the twin sons of Elrond Half-elven and Celebrían. ... Elladan and Elrohir are fictional characters in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the twin sons of Elrond Half-elven and Celebrían. ... Eldarion is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...

Other characters named Beren

An earlier Beren, son and youngest child of Belemir and Adanel, was the father of Emeldir, and grandfather of Beren Erchamion. Adanel is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle_earth legendarium. ...


Another Beren was a Steward of Gondor in the years 2743–2763 of the Third Age. Under his rule the fortress of Isengard was given to Saruman to guard for Gondor. The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ... The Third Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Location of Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Isengard, a translation of the Sindarin Angrenost, was a large fortress. ... Saruman (1000 T.A. – 3019 T.A in Middle-earth) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... One rendition of the flag of Gondor Gondor is a fictional country from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


See also

  • Tyr, mythological inspiration for the sequence where Beren loses his hand to the Wolf.
  • The Tale of Beren and Lúthien


Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... The tale of Beren and Lúthien is a story about the love of the mortal Man Beren and the immortal Elf-maiden Lúthien which appears in several works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium
Published during his lifetime: The Hobbit | The Lord of the Rings | The Adventures of Tom Bombadil | The Road Goes Ever On
Posthumous publications: The Silmarillion | Unfinished Tales | The History of Middle-earth (12 volumes) | Bilbo's Last Song
Lists of articles: by category | by name | writings | characters | peoples | rivers | realms | ages

  Results from FactBites:
 
Beren - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1120 words)
Lúthien and the unconscious Beren were rescued by the Eagles of Manwë.
Beren participated in the hunting of Carcharoth, in which the beast was slain and the Silmaril recovered; the quest was accomplished, but Beren was mortally wounded.
An earlier Beren, son and youngest child of Belemir and Adanel, was the father of Emeldir, and grandfather of Beren Erchamion.
Beren (428 words)
Beren was the son of Barahir, a Man of the royal House of Bëor of Dorthonion, and the the most accomplished hero and adventurer of the First Age.
Beren lived to participate in the Hunting of Carcharoth, where the beast was slain and the Silmaril recovered, but he was mortally wounded there.
Lúthien bore Beren a son, named Dior, Thingol's heir, considered to be one of the fairest beings to ever live, for in him flowed the blood of Men, the blood of Elves, and the blood of the Ainur.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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