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Encyclopedia > Beowulf (2007 film)
Beowulf
Directed by Robert Zemeckis
Produced by Steve Bing
Robert Zemeckis
Written by Neil Gaiman
Roger Avary
Starring Ray Winstone
Anthony Hopkins
Angelina Jolie
Crispin Glover
Robin Wright Penn
John Malkovich
Brendan Gleeson
Alison Lohman
Music by Alan Silvestri
Cinematography Robert Presley
Editing by Jeremiah O'Driscoll
Distributed by Paramount Pictures (USA)
Warner Brothers (Non-USA)
Release date(s) November 16, 2007 (theater)
Running time 115 min.
Country United States
Language English
Old English
Budget $150 million
Gross revenue $196,149,662 (worldwide)
Official website
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Beowulf is a 2007 performance capture action film based on the Old English epic poem of the same name. Directed by Robert Zemeckis, the film was created through a motion capture process similar to the technique used in The Polar Express. The cast includes Ray Winstone, Anthony Hopkins, Robin Wright Penn, Alison Lohman, John Malkovich, Crispin Glover, Brendan Gleeson, and Angelina Jolie. It was released in the United States, Canada and the UK on November 16, 2007, and was available to view in IMAX 3D, Real D and standard 2D format. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... Stephen Leo Bing (b. ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... Raymond Andrew Winstone, Jr. ... For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... Angelina Jolie (born Angelina Jolie Voight on June 4, 1975) is an American film actor, a former fashion model, and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ... For the Scarling. ... Robin Gayle Wright Penn (born April 8, 1966) is an American film actress. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Alison Marion Lohman (born September 18, 1979) is an American actress. ... Alan Silvestri (b. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Warner Bros. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to both the 2004 summer movie season and several film franchises which premiered or had installments released in 2004, which appear again this year: Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Motion capture. ... Old English redirects here. ... For other meanings of epic, see Epic. ... This article is about the epic poem. ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... The Polar Express is a 2004 feature film based on the childrens book of the same title by Chris Van Allsburg. ... Raymond Andrew Winstone, Jr. ... For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... Robin Gayle Wright Penn (born April 8, 1966) is an American film actress. ... Alison Marion Lohman (born September 18, 1979) is an American actress. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ... For the Scarling. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Angelina Jolie (born Angelina Jolie Voight on June 4, 1975) is an American film actor, a former fashion model, and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display images of far greater size and resolution than conventional film display systems. ... Real D Cinema is a new digital 3D stereoscopic projection technology which does not require two projectors, unlike some older 3D stereoscopic projection technology. ...

Contents

Plot

Set in Denmark, the film opens with King Hrothgar celebrating the construction of his new mead hall, Heorot. The noise of the celebration echoes into Grendel's cave and torments him. In a mad fury, Grendel breaks into the hall and kills many people. After being challenged by Hrothgar Grendel runs off into the night. Back at his lair, Grendel is admonished by his unseen mother for attacking the humans and possibly inviting retribution. She calms down after Grendel tells her that he did not harm Hrothgar. Hroðgar (Hrothgar, Hróar, Ro), legendary Danish king. ... A reconstructed Viking Age longhouse (28,5 metres long). ... Heorot is the stronghold of king Hrothgar in the epic poem Beowulf. ... For other uses, see Grendel (disambiguation). ... The first page of Beowulf Grendels mother (Old English: Grendles modor) is one of three antagonists (along with Grendel and the dragon) in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf (c. ...


Meanwhile, Hrothgar closes Heorot and proclaims that he will give half of his kingdom in gold to any man who can defeat Grendel. Beowulf and his men arrive by ship from Geatland and convince Hrothgar to reopen Heorot. Beowulf's credibility is challenged by Unferth, the King's most trusted advisor. Beowulf proceeds to tell a tale to convince the people of Heorot that he is capable of killing Grendel. Hrothgar offers Beowulf his Golden drinking horn in the event that Grendel is destroyed. Beowulf fights the dragon Beowulf (IPA: ) is the legendary hero and king of the Anglo-Saxon epic poem of the same name. ... Götaland Unofficial Nordic cross flag of western Götaland. ... Unferth was a character of the epic poem Beowulf. ...


Later Hrothgar and Queen Wealtheow argue. Hrothgar states that he needs an heir. Wealtheow refuses to comply due to Hrothgar's earlier involvement with Grendel's mother (thus conceiving Grendel). Wealhþeow is the queen of the Daner, in Beowulf. ...


That evening, Beowulf asks his men to sing loudly. Grendel is agitated once again and attacks the hall in a blind fury. While fighting Grendel, Beowulf discovers an external eardrum and begins to attack it. This disorients Grendel who then tries to escape. Beowulf traps him with chains and later slams the door on his arm breaking it off. Beowulf is proclaimed a hero and Grendel's arm is nailed above the door of Heorot.


After Grendel returns to the cave to die, Grendel's mother cries out in grief over the loss of her son. Determined to avenge his death, she flies to Heorot in a rage. She initially appears to Beowulf in a dream disguised as Wealtheow. When Beowulf wakes from the dream he finds that all of his men are dead except for Wiglaf. Beowulf confronts Hrothgar who confesses his own past with Grendel's mother and tells Beowulf how he can find her. Unferth, who has by this time converted to Christianity, appears before Beowulf and apologizes to him for his previous behavior. Wiglaf is a young well-regarded Swedish warrior of the Waegmunding clan, in Beowulf. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ...


Beowulf and Wiglaf find the cave. Beowulf enters it alone, eventually confronting Grendel's mother. She appears to him as a beautiful nude woman with golden liquid dripping from her skin. She promises him fame and power if he gives her a son. She also demands the Horn of Hrothgar with the promise that as long as it is in her safekeeping, Heorot will be safe. Beowulf gives in to her temptations.


Beowulf returns to Heorot and tells a disbelieving Hrothgar that he killed Grendel's mother. Hrothgar states that the curse has been passed to Beowulf and then proclaims that Beowulf will be king. Hrothfar leaps from his balcony and falls to his death. Beowulf is crowned king.


Many years pass. King Beowulf is now old and disillusioned, a shadow of his former self. At Heorot, Unferth's servant has found the Horn of Hrothgar which appeared in the sand before him. Beowulf sees this as a sign that Grendel's mother will return and dreams that evening of a man in gold. The next day, a fierce dragon attacks a village outside of Heorot and leaves a message with Unferth for Beowulf.


Beowulf and Wiglaf ride to the cave of Grendel's mother. It is there that Beowulf confronts the dragon. After fleeing the cave, the dragon attempts to attack Queen Wealtheow and Beowulf's mistress, Ursula, before Beowulf kills it in a highly interesting manner. Dangling from the dragon on a chain, Beowulf is unable to reach the dragon's heart with his sword. At that point, he severs his own arm in an attempt to reach closer towards the dragon's heart. However, after that fails, he discards the sword, and is somehow able to reach the heart with his bare hands, although he was unable to reach it with his sword.


The two fall to the shores far below. The dragon reverts to the golden man of Beowulf's dream, whom Beowulf realizes is his son. He then dies in Wiglaf's arms.


Wiglaf prepares a Viking funeral for Beowulf. As Wiglaf watches the burning boat that serves as Beowulf's funeral pyre, he sees Grendel's mother kissing the corpse amidst the flames. The Dragon Horn also washes ashore and Wiglaf finds it. As he does, Grendel's mother emerges from the sea to beckon Wiglaf, with the story ending ambiguously, unsure if the cycle will begin again. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into ship burial. ...


Production

Author Neil Gaiman and screenwriter Roger Avary wrote a screen adaptation of Beowulf in May 1997 (they had met while working on a film adaptation of Gaiman's The Sandman in 1996, before Warner Bros. canceled it).[1] The script had been optioned by ImageMovers in the same year and set up at DreamWorks with Avary slated to direct and Robert Zemeckis producing. Avary stated he wanted to make a small-scale, gritty film, with a budget of $15-20 million, similar to Jabberwocky or Excalibur.[1] The project eventually went into turnaround after the option expired, the rights returned to Avary, who went on to direct an adaptation of The Rules of Attraction. In January 2005, producer Steve Bing, at the behest of Zemeckis who was wanting to direct the film himself, revived the production by convincing Avary that Zemeckis' vision, supported by the strength of digitally enhanced live action, was worth relinquishing the directorial reins.[2][3] Zemeckis did not like the poem, but enjoyed reading the screenplay. Because of the expanded budget, Zemeckis told the screenwriters to rewrite their script, because "there is nothing that you could write that would cost me more than a million dollars per minute to film. Go wild!" In particular, the entire fight with the dragon was rewritten from a talky confrontation to a battle spanning the cliffs and the sea.[1] Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... The Sandman is a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Robert Zemeicks Execuyive For ImageMovers ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... USD redirects here. ... Jabberwocky (1977) is a comic medieval film by Monty Pythons resident animator, Terry Gilliam. ... Excalibur is a 1981 film which retells the legend of King Arthur. ... A turnaround or turnaround deal is an arrangement in the film industry, whereby the rights to a project one studio has developed are sold to another studio in exchange for the cost of development. ... The Rules of Attraction (2002) is a dark satirical film based on the novel of the same name by Bret Easton Ellis. ... The Rules of Attraction is a novel by Bret Easton Ellis published in 1987 and made into a film by the same name in 2002. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... Stephen Leo Bing (b. ... Motion capture, or mocap, is a technique of digitally recording the movements of real things — usually humans — it originally developed as an analysis tool in biomechanics research, but has grown increasingly important as a source of motion data for computer animation. ...


Sony Pictures Imageworks created the animation for the film. Animation supervisor Kenn MacDonald explained that Zemeckis used motion capture because “Even though it feels like live action, there were a lot of shots where Bob cut loose. Amazing shots. Impossible with live action actors. This method of filmmaking gives him freedom and complete control. He doesn’t have to worry about lighting. The actors don’t have to hit marks. They don’t have to know where the camera is. It’s pure performance." A 25 x 35-foot stage was built, and it used 244 Vicon MX40 cameras. Actors on set wore seventy-eight body markers. The cameras recorded realtime footage of the performances, shots which Zemeckis reviewed. The director then used a virtual camera to choose camera angles from the footage which was edited together. Two teams of animators worked on the film, with one group working on replicating the facial performances, the other working on body movement. The animators said they worked very closely on replicating the human characters, but the character of Grendel had to be almost reworked, because he is a monster, not human.[4] Sony Pictures Imageworks Inc. ... Motion capture, or mocap, is a technique of digitally recording the movements of real things — usually humans — it originally developed as an analysis tool in biomechanics research, but has grown increasingly important as a source of motion data for computer animation. ... For other uses, see Grendel (disambiguation). ...


In designing the dragon, production designer Doug Chiang wanted to create something unique in film. The designers looked at bats and flying squirrels for inspiration, and also designed its tail to allow underwater propulsion. As the beast is Beowulf's son with Grendel's mother, elements such as Winstone's eyes and cheekbone structure were incorporated into its look.[5] The three primary monsters in the film share a golden color scheme, because they are all related. Grendel has patches of gold skin, but because of his torment, he has shed much of his scales as well as exposing his internal workings. He still had to resemble Crispin Glover though: the animators decided to adapt Glover's own parted hairstyle to Grendel, albeit with bald patches.[4] Doug Chiang is an American movie designer and artist. ... “Chiroptera” redirects here. ... Two groups of rodents are referred to as flying squirrels. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... For the Scarling. ...


Cast

The cast members of Beowulf were filmed on a motion capture stage. They were altered on screen using computer-generated imagery, but their animated counterparts bear much resemblance to themselves. Motion capture, or mocap, is a technique of digitally recording the movements of real things — usually humans — it originally developed as an analysis tool in biomechanics research, but has grown increasingly important as a source of motion data for computer animation. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ...


The protagonist, Beowulf, is portrayed by Ray Winstone. Zemeckis cast Winstone after seeing his performance as King Henry VIII of England on television.[1] On the topic of the original poem, Winstone commented during an interview that "I had the beauty of not reading the book, which I understand portrays Beowulf as a very one-dimensional kind of character - a hero and a warrior and that was it. I didn't have any of that baggage to bring with me."[6] Winstone enjoyed working with motion capture, stating that “You were allowed to go, like theater, where you carry a scene on and you become engrossed within the scene. I loved the speed of it. There was no time to sit around. You actually cracked on with a scene and your energy levels were kept up. There was no time to actually sit around and lose your concentration. So, for me, I actually really, really enjoyed this experience." Winstone also noted that his computer-generated counterpart resembled himself at the age of eighteen, although the filmmakers did not have a photo for reference.[7] Winstone also played a dwarf performer, and the "Golden Man"/Dragon.[6] A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... Beowulf fights the dragon Beowulf (IPA: ) is the legendary hero and king of the Anglo-Saxon epic poem of the same name. ... Raymond Andrew Winstone, Jr. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ...


The antagonists Grendel and Grendel's mother are portrayed by Crispin Glover and Angelina Jolie, respectively. Glover had previously worked with Zemeckis in Back to the Future (1985), when he portrayed George McFly. Zemeckis had found Glover tiresome on set, because of his lack of understanding of shooting a film, but realized this would not be a problem as on a motion capture film he could choose his angles later.[8] Glover's dialogue was entirely in Old English.[7] Jolie had wanted to work with Zemeckis. She had read the poem years ago but could not remember it well until she read the script and was able to recall basic themes. The actress was told that she "was going to be a lizard. Then I was brought into a room with Bob, and a bunch of pictures and examples, and he showed me this picture of a woman half painted gold, and then a lizard. And, I’ve got kids and I thought 'That's great. That's so bizarre. I'm going to be this crazy reptilian person and creature.'" Jolie filmed her role over two days when she was three months pregnant. She was startled by the character's nude human form, stating that for an animated film “I was really surprised that I felt that exposed."[7] For other uses, see Antagonist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Grendel (disambiguation). ... The first page of Beowulf Grendels mother (Old English: Grendles modor) is one of three antagonists (along with Grendel and the dragon) in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf (c. ... For the Scarling. ... Angelina Jolie (born Angelina Jolie Voight on June 4, 1975) is an American film actor, a former fashion model, and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ... This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... George Douglas McFly is a fictional lead character in the first Back to the Future motion picture, played by actor Crispin Glover, and a minor character in the 2 sequels, played by Jeffrey Weissman. ... Motion capture, or mocap, is a technique of digitally recording the movements of real things — usually humans — it originally developed as an analysis tool in biomechanics research, but has grown increasingly important as a source of motion data for computer animation. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ...


King Hrothgar is portrayed by Anthony Hopkins. Hopkins noted in an interview that since Zemeckis is an American, he wasn't certain what accent Hopkins should use for the role of Hrothgar. Hopkins told him, "Well, Welsh would be my closest because that's where I come from." It was also his first time working with motion capture technology. Hopkins noted that “I didn't know what was expected. It was explained to me, I'm not stupid, but I still don't get the idea of how it works. I have no idea [...] you don't have sets, so it is like being in a Brecht play, you know, with just bare bones and you have nothing else." When asked if he had to read the original poem of Beowulf in school, Hopkins replied: "No, I was hopeless at school. I couldn't read anything. I mean I could read, but I was so inattentive. I was one of those poor kids, you know, who was just very slow, didn't know what they were talking about [...] So I tried to get around to reading Beowulf just before I did this movie, and it was a good modern translation. It was Trevor Griffiths, I’m not sure, but I couldn't hack it, and I tend to like to just go with the script if it's a good script."[9] Hroðgar (Hrothgar, Hróar, Ro), legendary Danish king. ... For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... Welsh English, Anglo-Welsh, or Wenglish (see below) refer to the dialects of English spoken in Wales by Welsh people. ... For information on the German author, please see Bertolt Brecht. ... Trevor Griffiths (born 4 April 1935 in Manchester) is an English dramatist. ...


Unferth is portrayed by John Malkovich. Malkovich became involved in the project because one of his friends, who had worked with Zemeckis, "spoke very highly of him. I had always found him a very interesting and innovative filmmaker. I liked the script very much and I liked the group involved and the process interested me a great deal also." He found the experience of working with motion capture to be similar to his experiences working in the theater. He also found the process intriguing: "say you do a normal day of filmmaking. Sometimes that’s 1/8th of a page, sometimes it’s 3/8th of a page, normally let’s say it’s 2-1/2 pages, maybe 3. Now it’s probably a little more than it used to be but not always. So you may be acting for a total of 20 minutes a day. In this, you act the entire day all the time except for the tiny amount of time it takes them to sort of coordinate the computer information, let’s say, and make sure that the computers are reading the data and that you’re transmitting the data. It interests me on that level because I’m a professional actor so I’d just as soon act as sit around." Malkovich also recalled that he studied the original poem in high school, and that “I think we got smacked if we couldn’t recite a certain number of stanzas. It was in the Old English class and I think my rendition was exemplary."[10] Unferth was a character of the epic poem Beowulf. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ...


The cast also includes:

Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Wiglaf is a young well-regarded Swedish warrior of the Waegmunding clan, in Beowulf. ... Robin Gayle Wright Penn (born April 8, 1966) is an American film actress. ... Wealhþeow is the queen of the Daner, in Beowulf. ... Alison Marion Lohman (born September 18, 1979) is an American actress. ... Madame de Pompadour, the mistress of King Louis XV of France. ... Sebastian Roché (born August 4, 1964) is a French actor. ... Costas Mandylor (born on 3 September 1965 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) is an Australian actor of Greek descent. ... Greg Ellis (born March 21, 1968 in Wigan, Lancashire, England) is an English actor. ... Wermund , an ancestor of the Mercian royal family, a son of Wihtlaeg and father of Offa. ... Tyler Steelman is an American actor. ... Dominic Keating as Malcolm Reed Dominic Keating (born July 1, 1962) is a British television, film and theatre actor. ... Eofor, son of Wonred, was a Geatish warrior in Beowulf. ... Charlotte Salt (born on August 12, 1985 in Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, England) is a British actress who is now working in America. ... Yrsa learns of her true fathers identity In Scandinavian legendary tradition Yrsa is the illegitimate daughter of Helgi whom Helgi later unwittingly married and on whom he fathered his famous son Hrólf Kraki. ...

Differences from the poem

"It occurred to me that Grendel has always been described as the son of Cain, meaning half-man, half-demon, but his mother was always said to be full demon. So who's the father? It must be Hrothgar, and if Grendel is dragging men back to the cave then it must be for the mother, so that she can attempt to sire another of demonkind."
— Roger Avary[1]

One objective of Neil Gaiman and Roger Avary was to offer their own interpretation for motivations behind Grendel's behavior as well as for what happened when Beowulf was in the cave of Grendel's mother. They justified these choices by arguing that Beowulf acts as an unreliable narrator in the portion of the poem in which he describes his battle with Grendel's mother.[11] These choices also helped them to better connect the third act to the second of their screenplay, which is divided in the poem by a 50-year gap.[12] In stories common to the Abrahamic religions, Cain or Káyin (קַיִן / קָיִן spear Standard Hebrew Qáyin, Tiberian Hebrew Qáyin / Qāyin; Arabic قايين Qāyīn in the Arabic Bible; قابيل Qābīl in Islam) is the eldest son of Adam and Eve, and the first man born in creation... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... Illustration by Gustave Doré for Baron Münchhausen: tall tales, such as those of the Baron, often feature unreliable narrators. ...


Some of the changes made by the film as noted by scholars include: the style and tone of the dialog; the portrayal of Beowulf as a flawed man rather than a standard hero; the addition of Christian elements and the portrayal of Unferth in this context; the hedonism in Heorot and which kingdom Beowulf becomes ruler of; the portrayal of Grendel's mother as a "seductress" and her seduction of Hrothgar, making him the father of Grendel, and making Beowulf the father of the dragon, as well as the elimination of the battle sequence between Grendel's mother and Beowulf which, in the poem, ends with her death; the portrayal of King Hrothgar as a "hedonistic lout," or "a drunk and womanizer" and the elimination of his two sons with Wealtheow; Wiglaf's role; and the nature of Beowulf's funeral.[13][14][15] For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any sources. ...


Scholars and authors have also commented on these changes. Southern Methodist University's Director of Medieval Studies Bonnie Wheeler is "convinced that the new Robert Zemeckis movie treatment sacrifices the power of the original for a plot line that propels Beowulf into seduction by Angelina Jolie -- the mother of the monster he has just slain.' What man doesn’t get involved with Angelina Jolie?' Wheeler asks. 'It’s a great cop-out on a great poem.' [...] 'For me, the sad thing is the movie returns to…a view of the horror of woman, the monstrous female who will kill off the male,' Wheeler says. 'It seems to me you could do so much better now. And the story of Beowulf is so much more powerful.'"[16] Dallas Hall at Dedman College at SMU The Laura Lee Blanton Hall during a rare snow storm Southern Methodist University (commonly SMU) is a nationally recognized, private, coeducational university in University Park, Texas (an enclave of Dallas). ...


In addition, philosophy professor Stephen T. Asma argues that “Zemeckis's more tender-minded film version suggests that the people who cast out Grendel are the real monsters. The monster, according to this charity paradigm, is just misunderstood rather than evil (similar to the version presented in John Gardner's novel Grendel). The blame for Grendel's violence is shifted to the humans, who sinned against him earlier and brought the vengeance upon themselves. The only real monsters, in this tradition, are pride and prejudice. In the film, Grendel is even visually altered after his injury to look like an innocent, albeit scaly, little child. In the original Beowulf, the monsters are outcasts because they're bad (just as Cain, their progenitor, was outcast because he killed his brother), but in the film Beowulf the monsters are bad because they're outcasts [...] Contrary to the original Beowulf, the new film wants us to understand and humanize our monsters."[17] Grendel is a 1971 parallel novel by American author John Gardner. ... In stories common to the Abrahamic religions, Cain or Káyin (קַיִן / קָיִן spear Standard Hebrew Qáyin, Tiberian Hebrew Qáyin / Qāyin; Arabic قايين QāyÄ«n in the Arabic Bible; قابيل QābÄ«l in Islam) is the eldest son of Adam and Eve, and the first man born in creation...


Finally, former Children's Laureate Michael Morpurgo argues that “The film changes the very nature of its hero. He becomes vulnerable and flawed, and he loses much of his nobility. The minute he starts lying, he becomes less interesting. The monster, Grendel, is also rather diminished here. He is imagined as a pathetic creature - you feel as if he's being eaten from the inside by maggots. I never had the sense of his enormous and terrifying strength. They've created a whole new plot about who slept with Grendel's mother, which feels clunky."[18] Childrens Laureate is an award made in the UK once every two years to a distinguished writer or illustrator of childrens books. ... Michael Andrew Bridge Morpurgo OBE (born 5 October 1943) is a British writer. ...


Release

Columbia Pictures was set to distribute the film, but Steven Bing did not finalize a deal, and arranged with Paramount Pictures for U.S. distribution and Warner Bros. Pictures for international distribution.[19] Beowulf was set to premiere at the 2007 Venice Film Festival, but was not ready in time.[20] The film's world premiere was held in Westwood, California on November 5, 2007.[21] The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... Stephen Leo Bing (b. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Warner Bros. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... Westwood is also a district in the city of Los Angeles, California Westwood is a census-designated place located in Lassen County, California. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


At Comic-Con International in July 2006, Gaiman said Beowulf would be released on November 22, 2007.[22] The following October, Beowulf was announced to be projected in 3-D in over 1,000 theaters for its release date in November 2007. The studios planned to use 3-D projection technology that had been used by Monster House, Chicken Little, and 3-D re-release of The Nightmare Before Christmas, but on a larger scale than previous films. Beowulf would additionally be released in 35mm alongside the 3-D projections.[23] Comic-Con International, commonly known as Comic-Con or the San Diego Comic-Con, is an annual multigenre fan convention founded as the Golden State Comic Book Convention and later the San Diego Comic Book Convention in 1970 by Shel Dorf and a group of San Diegans. ... Early elections in November are announced in the Netherlands. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... In film, the term 3-D (or 3D) is used to describe any visual presentation system that attempts to maintain or recreate moving images of the third dimension, the illusion of depth as seen by the viewer. ... November 2007 is the eleventh month of that year. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... Chicken Little (2005) is a computer-generated imagery (CGI) animated film and the forty-fifth animated feature made and produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution on November 4, 2005. ... Halloween Town redirects here. ...


To promote the film, a four issue comic book adaptation by IDW Publishing was released every week in October 2007.[24] A video game featuring the vocals of Winstone, Gleeson and Hopkins was released on Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PC and PSP formats.[25] The soundtrack composed by Alan Silvestri was released on November 20, 2007. Critics and even some of the actors expressed shock at the rating of film, which allowed children under twelve to see it in America and Britain. Angelina Jolie called it "remarkable" that the film had such a young rating, and admitted that she would not take her children to see it.[26] IDW Publishing (a division of Idea and Design Works) is an American comic book company. ... October 2007 is the tenth month of that year. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ... A stylised illustration of a personal computer A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose original sales price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals, intended to be operated directly by an end user, with no intervening computer operator. ... The PlayStation Portable (officially abbreviated PSP)[5] is a handheld game console manufactured and marketed by Sony Computer Entertainment. ... Alan Silvestri (b. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Angelina Jolie (born Angelina Jolie Voight on June 4, 1975) is an American film actor, a former fashion model, and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ...


Box office

Beowulf ranked #1 in the United States and Canada box office during its opening weekend date of November 18[27] grossing $27.5 million in 3,153 theaters.[28] is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


As of April 27, 2008, the film has grossed an estimated domestic total of $82,195,215 and a foreign box office total of $113,954,447 for a worldwide gross of $196,149,662.[29]


Critical reception

As of April 1, 2008 on the review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, Beowulf received a rating of 70%, based upon 174 reviews. Under the category "Cream of the Crop" Beowulf received a rating of 70 percent, with an average reviewer rating of 6.5/10.[30] On Metacritic, the film had an average score of 59 out of 100, based on 35 reviews, indicating "mixed or average" reviews.[31] is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ...


Giving Beowulf three out of four stars, Roger Ebert argues that the film is a satire of the original poem.[32] Time magazine critic Richard Corliss describes the film as one with "power and depth" and suggests that the "effects scenes look realer, more integrated into the visual fabric, because they meet the traced-over live-action elements halfway. It all suggests that this kind of a moviemaking is more than a stunt. By imagining the distant past so vividly, Zemeckis and his team prove that character capture has a future."[33] Corliss later named it the 10th best film of 2007.[34] Rolling Stone critic Peter Travers argues that “The eighth-century Beowulf, goosed into twenty-first century life by a screenplay from sci-fi guru Neil Gaiman and Pulp Fiction's Roger Avary, will have you jumping out of your skin and begging for more [...] I've never seen a 3-D movie pop with this kind of clarity and oomph. It's outrageously entertaining."[35] Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... TIME redirects here. ... Richard Corliss is a writer for Time magazine who focuses on movies, with the occasional article on music or sports, and has distinguished himself for his clever way with words. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Peter Travers is the film critic for Rolling Stone magazine. ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ...


Tom Ambrose of Empire gives the film four out of five stars. He argues that Beowulf is "the finest example to date of the mo-capabilities of this new technique [...] Previously, 3D movies were blurry, migraine-inducing affairs. Beowulf is a huge step forward [...] Although his Cockney accent initially seems incongruous [...] Winstone’s turn ultimately reveals a burgeoning humanity and poignant humility." Ambrose also argues that “the creepy dead eyes thing has been fixed."[36] Justin Chang of Variety argues that the screenwriters "have taken some intriguing liberties with the heroic narrative [... the] result is, at least, a much livelier piece of storytelling than the charmless Polar Express." He also argues that “Zemeckis prioritizes spectacle over human engagement, in his reliance on a medium that allows for enormous range and fluidity in its visual effects yet reduces his characters to 3-D automatons. While the technology has improved since 2004's Polar Express (particularly in the characters' more lifelike eyes), the actors still don't seem entirely there. Beowulf is more vocally than visually commanding."[37] Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... The Polar Express is a 1985 childrens book, which was later made into a movie that was released on November 12, 2004. ... The Polar Express is a 2004 feature film based on the childrens book of the same title by Chris Van Allsburg. ...


Kenneth Turan of National Public Radio criticizes the film arguing: “It's been 50 years since Hollywood first started flirting with 3-D movies, and the special glasses required for viewing have gotten a whole lot more substantial. The stories being filmed are just as flimsy. Of course Beowulf does have a more impressive literary pedigree than, say, Bwana Devil. But you'd never know that by looking at the movie. Beowulf's story of a hero who slays monsters has become a fanboy fantasy that panders with demonic energy to the young male demographic."[38] Manohla Dargis of the New York Times compared the poem with the film stating that, "If you don’t remember this evil babe from the poem, it’s because she’s almost entirely the invention of the screenwriters Roger Avary and Neil Gaiman and the director Robert Zemeckis, who together have plumped her up in words, deeds and curves. These creative interventions aren’t especially surprising given the source material and the nature of big-studio adaptations. There’s plenty of action in Beowulf, but even its more vigorous bloodletting pales next to its rich language, exotic setting and mythic grandeur [...] Yet the 3-D is necessary to the film only insofar as it keeps your eyes engaged when your mind starts to wander. Stripped of much of the original poem’s language, its cadences, deep history and context, this film version of Beowulf doesn’t offer much beyond 3-D oohs and ahs, sword clanging and a nicely conceived dragon."[39] San Francisco Chronicle critic Mick LaSalle suggests: "It's the Beowulf saga once again, and the movie becomes tiresome and trivial - well done within the narrow limits of its aspiration but not worth the inflated effort. To do Beowulf again, there should be some reason to do Beowulf at all. In 2005, for example, Beowulf & Grendel revisited the tale in order to present Grendel as a nice guy with his own point of view. That was a very bad reason to revisit Beowulf, but at least it was a reason."[40] Kenneth Turan is an American film critic, currently writing for the Los Angeles Times. ... NPR redirects here. ... Bwana Devil is a 1952 drama written, directed, and produced by Arch Oboler. ... Manohla Dargis is one of the chief film critics for The New York Times. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... Mick LaSalle (born May 7, 1959) is the film critic for the San Francisco Chronicle and the author of two books on pre-code Hollywood. ... Beowulf & Grendel is a 2005 film loosely based on the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf. ...


Soundtrack

Main article: Beowulf (soundtrack)

Home video

The DVD of Beowulf was released on February 26, 2008 (Region 1). A director's cut was also released as both a single disc DVD and two Disc HD DVD alongside the theatrical cut (which will only be available on single disc DVD). The theatrical cut includes A Hero's Journey: The Making of Beowulf while the single disc director's cut features four more short features. The HD DVD will have eleven short features and nine deleted scenes.[41] is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... The following is an excerpt of the article entitled DVD. For the sake of convenience, the terms Region 0, Region 1, Region 2, Region 3, Region 4, Region 5, Region 6, Region 7 and Region 8 redirect to this page. ... A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... HD-DVD disc HD DVD (for High Density Digital Versatile Disc) is a digital optical media format which is being developed as one standard for high-definition DVD. HD DVD is similar to the competing Blu-ray Disc, which also uses the same CD sized (120 mm diameter) optical data...


The director's cut was released on Blu-Ray in the United Kingdom on March 17, 2008. Blu-ray discs Blu-ray Disc is a next-generation optical disc format jointly developed by a group of leading consumer electronics and PC companies called the Blu_ray Disc Association (BDA), which succeeds the Blu_ray Disc Founders (BDF). ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e Tom Ambrose. "He Is Legend", Empire, December 2007, pp. 139-142. 
  2. ^ Nicole Laporte; Claude Brodesser. "Sony, Bing get Anglo on 'Beowulf'", Variety, 2005-01-20. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  3. ^ Kevil Kelly. "Comic-Con: 'Beowulf' Footage Screening, Q&A, and Party!", Cinematical, 2007-07-26. Retrieved on 2007-11-07. 
  4. ^ a b Barbara Robertson. "Beowulf Effects", CG Society, 2007-11-28. Retrieved on 2007-12-02. 
  5. ^ Sheigh Crabtree. "'Beowulf' breathes fire into a new kind of dragon", Los Angeles Times, 2007-11-04. Retrieved on 2007-11-08. 
  6. ^ a b Rob Carnevale. "Beowulf", BBC, 2007-11-12. Retrieved on 2007-11-16. 
  7. ^ a b c Sheila Roberts. "Cast of Beowulf Interview", Movies Online. Retrieved on 2007-11-08. 
  8. ^ "Becoming Beowulf", IGN, 2007-07-25. Retrieved on 2007-11-16. 
  9. ^ Sheila Roberts. "Anthony Hopkins Interview, Beowulf", Movies Online. Retrieved on 2007-11-13. 
  10. ^ Sheila Roberts. "John Malkovich Interview, Beowulf", Movies Online. Retrieved on 2007-11-13. 
  11. ^ Neil Gaiman and Roger Avary: Shaping Beowulf's story, video interview
  12. ^ Jeremy Smith. "INTERVIEW: NEIL GAIMAN AND ROGER AVARY (BEOWULF)", CHUD, 2007-07-30. Retrieved on 2007-11-07. 
  13. ^ Walter Quinn. "Beowulf' movie takes poetic license — and then some — from the original text", Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, 2007-11-23. Retrieved on 2007-11-27. 
  14. ^ Duane Dudek. "The Real Beowulf", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 2007-11-16. Retrieved on 2007-11-27. 
  15. ^ John V. Fleming. "Good Grief, Grendel", The New Republic, 2007-11-29. Retrieved on 2007-11-29. 
  16. ^ "Beowulf movie cops out with revised theme:It’s that evil woman’s fault", SMU, 2007-11-16. Retrieved on 2007-11-27. 
  17. ^ Asma, Stephen (December 7, 2007 Issue), Never Mind Grendel. Can Beowulf Conquer the 21st-Century Guilt Trip?, The Chronicle of Higher Education, pp. B20 
  18. ^ Paul Arendt. "Children's author Michael Morpurgo on Beowulf", Guardian, 2007-11-20. Retrieved on 2007-11-27. 
  19. ^ Michael Fleming; Dave McNary. "Par, WB cry 'Beowulf'", Variety, 2005-08-17. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  20. ^ Eric J. Lyman. "'Beowulf' misses Venice festival bow", The Hollywood Reporter, 2007-06-13. Retrieved on 2007-11-08. 
  21. ^ Robert Sanchez. "Exclusive Photo Gallery: World Premiere of Beowulf!", IESB, 2007-11-05. Retrieved on 2007-11-09. 
  22. ^ Hilary Goldstein. "Comic-Con 2006: Neil Gaiman's Future Movies", IGN, 2006-07-21. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  23. ^ Ben Fritz; Pamela McClintock. "'Beowulf' gets 3-D bigscreen bow", Variety, 2006-10-24. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  24. ^ ""BEOWULF" COMING TO THEATERS AND COMICS", Comic Book Resources, 2007-06-19. Retrieved on 2007-11-13. 
  25. ^ John Gaudiosi. "Anthony Hopkins, Ray Winstone Make Video Game Debuts in Beowulf", Game Daily, 2007-10-23. Retrieved on 2007-11-13. 
  26. ^ BBC. "Beowulf violence 'shocked' Jolie", BBC, 2007-11-12. Retrieved on 2007-12-24. 
  27. ^ "Beowulf tops US box office chart", BBC, 2007-11-19. Retrieved on 2007-11-19. 
  28. ^ Beowulf (2007). Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  29. ^ Beowulf (2007) - International Box Office Results. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  30. ^ Beowulf - Rotten Tomatoes. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2008-01-01.
  31. ^ Beowulf (2007): Reviews. Metacritic. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  32. ^ Roger Ebert. "Beowulf", Chicago Sun-Times, 2007-11-15. Retrieved on 2007-11-16. 
  33. ^ Richard Corliss. "Beowulf and Grendel — and Grendma", TIME, 2007-11-16. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. 
  34. ^ Metacritic: 2007 Film Critic Top Ten Lists. Metacritic. Retrieved on 2008-01-05.
  35. ^ Peter Travers. "Beowulf (Paramount)", Rolling Stone, 2007-11-15. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. 
  36. ^ Tom Ambrose. "Beowulf", Empire. Retrieved on 2007-11-12. 
  37. ^ Justin Chang. "Beowulf", Variety, 2007-11-09. Retrieved on 2007-11-11. 
  38. ^ Kenneth Turan. "Beowulf' Sexes Up, Dumbs Down an Epic", National Public Radio, 2007-11-16. Retrieved on 2007-11-16. 
  39. ^ Manohla Dargis. "Confronting the Fabled Monster, Not to Mention His Naked Mom", New York Times, 2007-11-16. Retrieved on 2007-11-16. 
  40. ^ Mick LaSalle. "Review: 'Beowulf' is back, beefed up, in 3D", San Francisco Chronicle, 2007-11-16. Retrieved on 2007-11-17. 
  41. ^ Tom Woodward. "Beowulf (US - DVD R1 | HD)", DVD Active. Retrieved on 2008-01-17. 

Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Comic Book Resources logo Comic Book Resources is a website dedicated to the coverage of comic book-related news and discussion. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Corliss is a writer for Time magazine who focuses on movies, with the occasional article on music or sports, and has distinguished himself for his clever way with words. ... This article is about the concept of time. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Travers is the film critic for Rolling Stone magazine. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth Turan is an American film critic, currently writing for the Los Angeles Times. ... NPR redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Manohla Dargis is one of the chief film critics for The New York Times. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mick LaSalle (born May 7, 1959) is the film critic for the San Francisco Chronicle and the author of two books on pre-code Hollywood. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Preceded by
Bee Movie
Box office number-one films of 2007 (USA)
November 18, 2007
Succeeded by
Enchanted
For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... This article or section should be merged with Yahoo! Yahoo! Movies provides information on current movie theater releases, including showtimes, critical reviews and general popular opinion. ... For the video game based on the film, see Bee Movie Game. ... This is a list of films which have placed number one at the weekend box office in the United States during 2007. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Enchanted is a 2007 comedy-fantasy-musical film directed by Kevin Lima. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... This article is about the epic poem. ... Beowulf fights the dragon Beowulf (IPA: ) is the legendary hero and king of the Anglo-Saxon epic poem of the same name. ... For other uses, see Grendel (disambiguation). ... The first page of Beowulf Grendels mother (Old English: Grendles modor) is one of three antagonists (along with Grendel and the dragon) in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf (c. ... Hroðgar (Proto-Norse *Hrōþigaizaz [1], Hrothgar, Hróar, Ro, Roar), legendary Danish king. ... Ecgþeow (Proto-Norse *Agiþewaz) is a character in the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf. ... Hygelac, Proto-Norse *Hugilaikaz [1], Latin Chlochilaicus, Old Norse Hugleikr (d. ... Heardred (d. ... Hrothgars most trusted warrior, killed by Grendels mother. ... Onela was according to Beowulf a Swedish king during the first half the 6th century. ... Queen Wealhtheow as the hostess of the banquet Wealhþeow is the queen of the Daner, in Beowulf. ... Wiglaf is a young well-regarded Swedish warrior of the Waegmunding clan, in Beowulf. ... Beowulf is an Old English heroic epic poem composed around 1100 AD. At 3,183 lines, the poem is notable for its length. ... Heorot is the stronghold of king Hrothgar in the epic poem Beowulf. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... he joost hoestie, wat loop je ons nou uit te schelden, je stinkt zelf, want je bent een nep japanner ... Meyer (Mike) Howard Abrams (born July 23, 1912) is an American literary critic, known for works on Romanticism, in particular his book The Mirror and the Lamp. ... Michael Joseph Alexander is a British academic. ... Nora Kershaw Chadwick was a twentieth century British scholar of traditional literature. ... Michael D. C. Drout (1968- ) is the Prentice Associate Professor of English at Wheaton College and an author and editor specialzing in Anglo-Saxon and medieval literature, science fiction and fantasy, especially the works of J. R. R. Tolkien and Ursula K. LeGuin. ... Stephen Jay Greenblatt (born November 7, 1943) is a literary critic, theorist and scholar. ... Frederick Klaeber (01 October 1863 - 04 October 1954) was a professor of Old and Middle English at the University of Minnesota. ... Seamus Justin Heaney (IPA: ) (born 13 April 1939) is an Irish poet, writer and lecturer who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. ... Burton Raffel is a translator, a poet and a teacher. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Charles Leslie Wrenn was a British scholar. ... Beowulf is an Old English heroic epic poem of anonymous authorship. ... Grendel is a 1971 parallel novel by American author John Gardner. ... Grendel, Grendel, Grendel is an animated film based on John Gardners novel and starring Peter Ustinov made in 1981. ... Eaters of the Dead: The Manuscript of Ibn Fadlan Relating His Experiences with the Northmen in A.D. 922 is a 1976 novel by Michael Crichton. ... The Legacy of Heorot is a science fiction novel written in 1987 by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes. ... Beowulfs Children is a science fiction novel written by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes. ... Beowulf DVD cover Beowulf is a 1999 action movie loosely based on the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf. ... The 13th Warrior is a 1999 action film based on Michael Crichtons novel Eaters of the Dead, directed by John McTiernan and an uncredited Crichton, and starring Antonio Banderas as Ahmad ibn Fadlan and Vladimir Kulich as Buliwyf (Beowulf). ... Beowulf & Grendel is a 2005 film loosely based on the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf. ... Wrath Of Gods is a documentary directed by Jon Gustafsson. ... The movie Grendel is a modern motion picture adaptation of the epic story of Beowulf and Grendel, as told in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf. ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... The decade of the 1970s in film involved many significant films. ... I Wanna Hold Your Hand is a comedy film directed and co-written by Robert Zemeckis. ... The decade of the 1980s in film involved many significant films. ... Used Cars is a 1980 comedy film. ... Romancing the Stone is an American 1984 action-adventure film. ... This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner), which blends traditional animation and live action. ... Back to the Future Part II is a 1989 film and the first sequel to the 1985 film Back to the Future. ... Films made in the 1990s included: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Above the Rim (1994) Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995) Ace Ventura: Pet... For the video game based on this film, see Back to the Future Part III (video game). ... Death Becomes Her is a 1992 black comedy fantasy film directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Goldie Hawn, Meryl Streep and Bruce Willis. ... Forrest gump redirects here. ... Contact is a 1997 science fiction film adapted from the novel by Carl Sagan. ... The first decade of the 2000s in film involved many significant films. ... What Lies Beneath is a 2000 motion picture that tells the story of a housewife who finds her home is haunted. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... The Polar Express is a 2004 feature film based on the childrens book of the same title by Chris Van Allsburg. ... A Christmas Carol is a 2009 film adaptation of Charles Dickens 1843 story of the same name. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... Killing Zoe is a 1994 movie directed by Roger Avary, and starring Eric Stoltz as Zed and Julie Delpy as Zoe. ... The Rules of Attraction (2002) is a dark satirical film based on the novel of the same name by Bret Easton Ellis. ... Glitterati is a 2004 film directed by Roger Avary assembled from the 70 hours of video footage shot for the European sequence of The Rules of Attraction in October of 2002, after the events of 9/11. ... True Romance is an American motion picture released in 1993, directed by Tony Scott and written by Quentin Tarantino and Roger Avary. ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ... Silent Hill is a 2006 horror film directed by Christophe Gans and written by Roger Avary. ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... American Gods is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... Anansi Boys is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... Angels and Visitations is a collection of short fiction and nonfiction by Neil Gaiman. ... Coraline (2002) is a novella for children and adults by the British author Neil Gaiman. ... Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders is a collection of short stories and poetry by English author, Neil Gaiman. ... Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (1990) is a fantasy novel written in collaboration between Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. ... The Graveyard Book is an upcoming novel by Neil Gaiman, mentioned in the introduction to Fragile Things. ... Interworld is a 2007 short novel made by Neil Gaiman and Michael Reaves published by HarperCollins HarperChildren imprint. ... M is for Magic is the recently released collection of child-friendly short fiction by Neil Gaiman. ... Neverwhere is the novelization by Neil Gaiman of the television serial Neverwhere, also written by Neil Gaiman. ... The cover of Smoke and Mirrors Smoke and Mirrors is a collection of short fiction by Neil Gaiman. ... For the movie based on this novel, see Stardust (2007 film). ... A Walking Tour of the Shambles (Little Walks For Sightseers #16) (2002), written by Neil Gaiman and Gene Wolfe, is a tour guide concerning a fictional part of Chicago called The Shambles. It guides the reader through such non-existent landmarks as The House of Clocks (see the official website... For the fiction genre murder mystery, see under crime fiction. ... Snow, Glass, Apples is a short story written by Neil Gaiman. ... Two Plays for Voices is a sound recording of Snow Glass Apples and Murder Mysteries. ... We Can Get Them For You Wholesale is a short story by Neil Gaiman written in 1989, included in his collection Angels and Visitations in 1993. ... A Study in Emerald is a short story written by British fantasy and comic book author Neil Gaiman. ... Angela is a fictional character in Todd McFarlanes Spawn comic book series. ... Lets us talks some realities here before we get into the fictional works here. ... The Books of Magic is the title of a four-issue English-language comic book limited series written by Neil Gaiman, and later an ongoing series, published by the DC Comics imprint Vertigo. ... Mr. ... Death as illustrated by Chris Bachalo. ... Cover of Harlequin Valentine Harlequin Valentine is a bloody and romantic graphic novel based on the old Commedia dellarte and Harlequinade pantomime. ... The Last Temptation was the 1994 faith-based concept album by rock singer, Alice Cooper. ... The story Death: The Time of Your Life was written by Neil Gaiman, and is one of many spinoffs from his graphic novel series The Sandman. ... The Eternals are a fictional race of superhumans in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Marvel 1602 is an eight-issue Marvel comic limited series, published in 2003, written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Andy Kubert, and digitally painted by Richard Isanove. ... The cover of Neil Gaimans Midnight Days. ... Miracleman, originally known as Marvelman in his native United Kingdom, is a fictional character, a comic book superhero created in 1954 by writer-artist Mick Anglo for publisher L. Miller & Son. ... Neil Gaimans Only The End of the World Again is a 2000 compilation of a serialized story published by Oni Press and originally appearing in Oni Double Feature #6-8 during 1998. ... The Sandman is a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman. ... Signal to Noise (ISBN 1569711445)is a graphic novel by written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Dave McKean (Illustrator). ... Tekno Comix, later renamed BIG Entertainment, published comic books between 1995 and 1996. ... The Tragical Comedy or Comical Tragedy of Mr. ... Violent Cases, cover art by Dave McKean Violent Cases is a short graphic novel written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Dave McKean. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Day of the Dead is an episode from the fifth season of the science fiction television series Babylon 5. ... Princess Mononoke ) is a Japanese animated film by Hayao Miyazaki, produced through his company, Studio Ghibli, that was first released in Japan on July 12, 1997 and in the United States on October 29, 1999 in select cities and on November 26, 1999. ... Heavy Metal It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... MirrorMask is a 2005 fantasy film from the Jim Henson Company, Samuel Goldwyn Films, and Destination Films. ... A Short Film About John Bolton is a 2003 film written and directed by Neil Gaiman. ... Death and Me is an upcoming film written and directed by Neil Gaiman, adapted from his comic Death: The High Cost of Living, about Death herself. ... Coraline is an upcoming film based on Neil Gaimans book, ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Angelina Jolie (742 words)
Is planning to give up her acting career to settle in England with her...
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Beowulf (2007 Film) (526 words)
The upcoming film adaptation of '' Beowulf '' is based on the epic Old English poem of the same name.
As with all film adaptations of classical material, expect a number of creative liberties to be taken with the story and the characters.
However, writer Neil Gaiman wrote on his [http://www.neilgaiman.com/journal/2005/10/deniable-reporting.asp blog] that this rumor was unfounded, that filming had not been shut down, and pointed out that Jolie had not yet started and was in no scenes with the people the article claimed she was in.
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