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Encyclopedia > Benjamin Walker
Benjamin Walker

G.B. Walker, taken in 1976 by Derek Abbott
Pseudonym(s): Benjamin Walker, Jivan Bhakar
Born: November 25, 1913
Calcutta, India
Occupation(s): Diplomatic Attaché and Author in the area of esoterica, philosophy, and religion
Nationality: British
Writing period: 1930 to Present
Genre(s): Non-fiction under the name Benjamin Walker; poetry, short stories and satire under the name Jivan Bhakar
Influences: George Bernard Shaw
Influenced: Colin Wilson

Benjamin Walker (November 25, 1913) is the truncated pen name of George Benjamin Walker, who also writes under the pseudonym Jivan Bhakar. He is a British citizen, and an Indian-born author on religion and philosophy, and an authority on esoterica in all its curious forms. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (480x640, 42 KB) Author of photo is Derek Abbott, used with permission provided name is identified on caption File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or subject matter (content). ... Non-fiction is an account or representation of a subject which is presented as fact. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... This article is in need of attention. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... George Bernard Shaw (George) Bernard Shaw[1] (born Dublin, 26 July 1856 – died 2 November 1950 in Hertfordshire) was an Irish playwright based in the United Kingdom. ... Colin Henry Wilson (born June 26, 1931) is a prolific British writer. ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The Death of Socrates, by Jacques-Louis David (1787) depicts the philosopher Socrates carrying out his own execution. ... Esoterica is a band from the South East of England, namely Surrey. ...


He was born George Benjamin Walker, in Calcutta (Kolkata), the son of Dr Simeon Benjamin Walker, M.D., and Mary Emily Fordyce, both of Pune, (Poona), India. His father was descended from a long line of Polish Jews who fled to India as refugees during the Russian pogrom in Moldavia in the 1790s. In India they became part of the Bene Israeli community as rabbis and community leaders. This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ...   (IPA: [] Bengali: কলকাতা) (formerly  ) is the capital of the Indian state of West Bengal. ... Puṇe (IPA: , Marathi: पुणे) is a city located in the western Indian state of Maharashtra. ... Pune, formerly called Poona, is the second largest city (after Mumbai) in the state of Maharashtra, India. ... Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centers. ... Moldavia (Moldova in Romanian) was a Romanian principality, originally created in the Middle Ages, now divided between Romania, Moldovan Republic and Ukraine. ... The Bene Israel (Sons of Israel) are a group of Jews who migrated in the nineteenth century from west Maharashtra to the nearby cities, primarily Mumbai, but also to Pune, Ahmadabad, and Karachi (Karachi later became a part of Pakistan). ...

Contents

Early Influences

Dr Simeon Walker (1873-1928) carried out a great deal of humanitarian work, in India, establishing a centre of studies called The Hall of Literature, Science and Hygiene that was formally opened by the Gaekwar (Maharaja) of Beroda (Vadodara) in 1900. The building was accidentally burned to the ground in 1902, along with thousands of books, manuscripts and official documents in Sanscrit, Marathi, Gujerati, Hebrew, and English, many of which had been contributed by scholars and old families who desired to contribute to this enterprise. Simeon Walker was also active in educational work, in the course of which he came to know several of the political leaders of the day that were forerunners of Mahatma Gandhi. They included G.K. Gokhale and B.G. Tilak. Simeon Walker was a staunch pacifist and would have nothing to do with those who advocated strong-arm tactics to achieve their ends. The Gaekwad (or Gaekwar) were a Maratha dynasty that ruled as Maharajas of Baroda (Vadodara) from the mid-eighteenth century to 1947. ... The word Maharaja (also spelled maharajah) is Hindi as well as ancient Sanskrit for high king (a karmadharaya from maha great and rajan king). Its use is primarily for Hindu potentates (ruler or sovereign). ... Vadodara (Gujarati: વડોદરા, Hindi Marathi: बडोदा),  , also known as Baroda, is the third most-populated town in the Indian state of Gujarat after Ahmedabad and Surat. ... Vadodara (Gujarati: વડોદરા, Hindi Marathi: बडोदा),  , also known as Baroda, is the third most-populated town in the Indian state of Gujarat after Ahmedabad and Surat. ... ... Marathi is one of the widely spoken languages of India, and has a long literary history. ... Gujarati (also sometimes Gujrati) is a language native to the state of Gujarat in western India. ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Gujarati: , Hindi: , IAST: mohandās karamcand gāndhÄ«, IPA: ) (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) was a major political and spiritual leader of the Indian independence movement. ... Gopal Krishna Gokhale (गोपाल कृष्‍ण गोखले) born May 9, 1866, in Kolhat, Maharashtra, India was one of the founding social and political leaders during the Indian Independence Movement against the British Empire in India. ... Lokmanya Tilak Bal Gangadhar Tilak, was an Indian nationalist, social reformer and freedom fighter who was the first popular leader of the Indian Independence Movement. ...


Emily Walker, née Fordyce, (1888-1975) was very keen to obtain a medical degree in England so that she might provide medical treatment for Indian women, since at the time they were very reluctant to be seen by male physicians. Accordingly Simeon Walker accompanied his wife to England where where she obtained an MB (Bachelor in Medicine) and several diplomas in female ailments and midwifery. During her stay in London she joined the Suffragette movement and met Emmeline Pankhurst. They married in 1906, and when Dr Simeon and Emily Walker returned to India in 1910 they decided to settle in Calcutta, at that time the capital of India. They opened a dispensary where for one day a week the poor were treated and given medication free. In total they had four children: Reema Rose (1906-1912), Alexander (1909-1991), William (1911), and George Benjamin (1913). Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst in Victoria Tower Gardens next to the Houses of Parliament, Westminster. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ...


Education

George Benjamin Walker, the third son of the Walkers, was born in Calcutta on November 25, 1913. He matriculated from the Calcutta Boys' School with distinctions in English and Urdu in 1929. At school, as a keen young scout, he was Patrol Leader in the 9th First Calcutta Troop. This later stood him in good stead when in 1971 he completed theorectical and practical work in an Advanced Youth Leadership course in Richmond-upon-Thames. November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The Calcutta Boys School was founded by James Mills Thoburn, Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was opened in 1877. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Richmond is an affluent suburb in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in South West London. ...


From school he went to the famous Jesuit institution, St. Xavier's College, Calcutta, where he received his BA degree with distinctions in English and Philosophy in 1933. He was admitted to the Calcutta University Postgraduate College where he received his MA degree with Honours in English. Years later, in 1989 he received an honourary degree of Doctor of Letters (D. Lett.) from the Vishwa Unnyayan Samsad of New Dehli. The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... St. ... Formally established on the 24 January 1857, the University of Calcutta (also known as Calcutta University) (Bengali: কলকাতা বিশ্ববিদ্যালয়), located in the city of Kolkata (previously Calcutta), India, is the first modern university in the Indian subcontinent. ... This article is about the urban region which is the capital of India. ...


When Walker was eight years old, he was asked what he wanted to be when he grew up. His reply was unequivocal, "I want to be a writer." His resolve in this direction never wavered as he grew up. Quite early on in his writing career Walker, like other young writers before him, cast his net wide, trying his hand at different forms of authorship.


Religion

George Walker's mother, a staunch Christian, had agreed to marry his father only on condition that the children were brought up as Christians. Simeon Walker, himself a Humanist, Rationalist, and Agnostic, agreed, provided the children were allowed free access to his vast library of books, many of which were highly critical of religion in general and Christianity in particular. Humanist may refer to: a scholar or academic in the Humanities a proponent of the group of ethical stances referred to as Humanism a long-running email discussion list on humanities computing in typography, a group of sans-serif typefaces with some calligraphic features, such as Humana, Optima, Frutiger, Johnston... This article is not about continental rationalism. ... The term agnosticism and the related agnostic were coined by Thomas Henry Huxley in 1869. ...


This turned out to be an invaluable arrangement for George Walker, for in addition to a fair understanding of the Bible and the Christian faith, he acquired an excellent knowledge of religiously 'seditious' literature of all kinds not easily available elsewhere. Because of this mixture of orthodoxy and scepticism he was well placed to write works on religious topics, which have become classics of their kind. His personal faith is Christian, although cannot be described as an adherent of organized religion. The word Bible refers to the canonical collections of sacred writings of Judaism and Christianity. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Christianity. ...


Career

In 1937, George Walker joined the British Consulate-General in Bushire (Bushehr), South Persia (Iran), first as Confidential Assistant and then as Personal Assistant to the Honourable Political Resident in the Persian Gulf. During this period he travelled widely throughout the region and was able to collect information for his book on Persia (Iran), which was well received by the critics. 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... A consulate (or consular office) is a form of diplomatic mission in charge of matters related to individual people and businesses, in other words issues outside inter-governmental diplomacy. ... Bushehr or Bushire (بوشهر), pop. ... Bushehr or Bushire (بوشهر), pop. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... A Consul or Consul-General has largely consular functions, such as looking after British business persons abroad. ... It has been suggested that Persian Gulf States be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ...


In 1943, he was sent to the Shia holy city of Meshed in the province of Khorasan, which borders on both Turkmenistan and Afghanistan. In Meshed, he was involved in supervising the transport of war commodities to the Russian front. While in Meshed he met and married (1945) a British-born Anglo-Russian girl, Xenia Dagmar Andrea Stevens-Williams (b. 1920), whose knowledge of English, French, German, and Russian were of immense value in his work. She also carried out translations of official documents from foreign languages into English for the British Consulate-General. They had no children. Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... Imam Reza Shrine Tomb of Nader Shah Afshar, a popular tourist attraction in Mashad. ... Khorasan (Persian: خراسان) (also transcribed as Khurasan and Khorassan; Horasan in Turkish) is a region located in eastern Iran. ... Imam Reza Shrine Tomb of Nader Shah Afshar, a popular tourist attraction in Mashad. ... Imam Reza Shrine Tomb of Nader Shah Afshar, a popular tourist attraction in Mashad. ...


With the end of the war in 1945, Walker's services were transferred to the new Republic of India. He served, first in the Central Cypher Bureau in New Delhi, then as a supervisory officer in the Division covering Bhutan, Sikkim, and Tibet, then in the East Asia division concerned with the region extending from Korea and Japan southwards to Indochina (Vietnam). Later he served in diplomatic posts as a Political Attaché in various countries. Sikkim (also Sikhim) (DevanāgarÄ«: सिक्किम  ) is a landlocked Indian state nestled in the Himalayas. ... This article is becoming very long. ... East Asia is a subregion of Asia that can be defined in either geographical or cultural terms. ... Korea (Korean: 한국 or ì¡°ì„ , see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. ... Indochina, or the Indochinese Peninsula, is a region in Southeast Asia. ...


From 1955 he was on the staff of the Indian Military Mission, in Berlin, in the British zone of the occupying Allied Forces. While in Berlin he was requested by Kathleen Bauer, of the British Council office there, to give classes in England to German adults keen to learn the language. This he did with great success. Berlin is the capital city and one of the sixteen states of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... Berlin is the capital city and one of the sixteen states of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... The British Council is a partly UK Government-funded cultural relations organisation and a registered charity in the United Kingdom. ...


In April 1968, Walker took early retirement in Middlesex, England, to devote himself to writing under the name of Benjamin Walker. To disguise his identity Walker also often wrote under the name of Jivan Bhakar, an Indian-sounding variant of 'G. Ben Walker.' 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and the second smallest (after Rutland). ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ...


Miscellany

Drama

Walker had written a three-act play called The Love Drug, which was produced at the St John's Club, Calcutta, November 1930, in which he himself also took part. The modest proceeds went to charity, receiving good reviews from local newspapers, but he felt he was not really cut out to be either a dramatist or an actor.


Short Stories

One of Walkers' stories entitled "Shanti," written under the pen name Jivan Bhakar, appeared in the Illustrated Weekly of Bombay in December 1950 and earned him a prize. Another story called "Kismet" was published in The Short Story Magazine, Calcutta. His career in this line did not long survive, as he felt spinning a yarn achieved very little.


Poetry

Walker wrote his first poem at the age of 10, describing the Great Fire of London of 1666, which appeared in his school magazine. He continued to write poetry into adulthood expressing his sentiment about the world and people. One such, called "We are," appeared in Life and Letters Today, London, August 1939. Another called "It still remains" appeared in Phylon, Atlanta University, March 1952. Detail of painting from 1666 of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it would have appeared on the evening of Tuesday, 4 September from a boat in the vicinity of Tower Wharf. ...


Over the years his poems have been published in journals in India, England, and America. A collection of his verse was published in Calcutta, 1956, under the title of Mixed Blood (Lena Press Calcutta, 1956). For a brief period he enjoyed a modest reputation as a minor Indian poet. By this time too, he realised the world was awash with poetasters, and he did not consider himself to be a first rate poet.


Articles

Features by Walker on Eastern affairs and various miscellanea have appeared in journals, newspapers, and books. Under the pen name of Jivan Bhakar he was a regular contributor, for three years between 1948 and 1950, to Shankar's Weekly, known as the 'Indian Punch', after the London-based satirical magazine celebrated for its wit and wisdom. The founder of the magazine, K. Shankar Pillai, informed Walker that his articles were enjoyed by Prime Minister Pandit Nehru. A brief sample of titles, below, give an indication of the diversity and scope of his work, which exceeded 250 articles: Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and the largest city of England (strangely, England has no constitutional existence within the United Kingdom, and therefore cannot be said to have a capital). ... Jawaharlal Nehru (जवाहरलाल नेहरू) (November 14, 1889 - May 27, 1964), also called Pandit (Teacher) Nehru, was the leader of the (moderately) socialist wing of the Indian National Congress during and after Indias struggle for independence from the British...

  • "In praise of Wordsworth," Statesman, Calcutta, 1935.
  • "The decline of freedom," Contemporary Affairs, Calcutta, 1936.
  • "Unemployment in Calcutta," Anglo-Indian Review, Calcutta, 1937.
  • "Lamet Hill peasants in Indochina," Pacific Affairs, Richmond, Virginia, 1952.
  • "Rock 'n' roll in the army," Berlin Bulletin, Berlin, 1952.
  • "Esoteric sexuality," Critique, Santa Rosa, California, 1989.
  • "The Kelts," Keltic Fringe, Uniondale, Pennsylvania, 1992.

Lectureship

As Walker had carried out a course in psychology, whilst at college, he was invited soon after to give a talk on the subject to the Blue Triangle YWCA Club in Calcutta. Rashly, he agreed and on the 1st October 1934 found himself facing a large group of ladies who, it appeared to him, were looking at the callow youth with curiosity and hauteur. With much trepidation he began speaking and soon found that he had the rapt attention of the audience. The success led to a repeat performance, of a subject of his own choice. He spoke on Wordsworth, with whose work and that of other Romantics, such as Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats he was well acquainted. Wordsworth, an underground hip hop MC from Brooklyn. ... Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... This page is about the nineteenth century English poet. ... The poet George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron is often referred to simply as Byron. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... The family name Keats, a surname of England is believed to be descended originally from the Anglo Saxon race from old English word cyta or cyte which has been used to describe a worker at the shed, outhouse for animals, hence herdsman. ...


From then on he continued to deliver talks, and during his official service he continued 'unofficially' giving lectures wherever he was posted, on topics that ranged over religion, philosophy, psychology, mysticism, history, and English literature, always avaoiding politics of which he had never been particularly enamoured.


Editorship

In 1950 while in Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) Walker made the acquaintance of René de Berval, the French author and journalist, and at the time editor of France Asie, a French quarterly on Asian studies. Walker persuaded him to start an English quarterly, which came to fruition and was called Asia. Through the mediation of Pierre Dannaud, Chief of the French Information Services of Indochina, and Louis Damais of the École française d'Extrême-Orient, financial support was provided and the quarterly was brought out. For political reasons René de Berval was Editor, and Walker was Joint-Editor under the pen-name of Jivan Bhakar. Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnamese: Thành Chí Minh) is the largest city in Vietnam, located near the delta of the Mekong River. ... Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnamese: Thành phố Hồ Chí Minh  ) is the largest city in Vietnam and is located near the Mekong River delta. ... The École française dExtrême-Orient (EFEO) is a French institute dedicated to the study of Asian societies. ...


From the start Asia became a significant success, ambitiously attempting to cover, as it successfully did, the whole of the continent, with contributions from renowned authorities on their respective specializations. Its readership soon overtook that of its French counterpart.


In 1951, Walker took a short break to visit Hanoi in the north to help the Indian consul there to set up an exhibition of Indian art. While he was in Hanoi, Marshal Jean de Lattre de Tassigny, Commander in Chief in French Indochina, personally thanked Walker for promoting French interests through Asia, though that was not the purpose of the quarterly. Hanoi (Vietnamese: Hà Ná»™i)  , estimated population 3,083,800 (2004), is the capital of Vietnam. ... Hanoi (Vietnamese: Hà Ná»™i)  , estimated population 3,083,800 (2004), is the capital of Vietnam. ... Jean de Lattre de Tassigny (February 2, 1889 - January 11, 1952) was a French military hero of World War II. Born at Mouilleron-en-Pareds (during the time of Georges Clemenceau, who was also born there), he graduated from school in 1911, and fought in World War I. He specialized... Indochina, or the Indochinese Peninsula, is a region in Southeast Asia. ...


Asia did not long survive Walker's transfer to another post two years later. To induce him to stay on, de Berval offered him a salary, with emoluments and honoraria four times more than his then salary with the Government of India. But Walker turned down the offer as he felt he could not remain anchored in Saigon. Besides, it was clear to many observers at the time that the political situation in Vietnam was deteriorating beyond the control of the French colonial administration. The offer to carry on with Asia was renewed, and again declined, when de Berval subsequently moved, along with France Asie and Asia, to Tokyo. Tokyo , literally Eastern capital)   is the seat of the Japanese government and the Imperial Palace, the home of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the de facto[1] capital of Japan. ...


Hindu World

Hindu World is regarded as Walker's magnum opus. It was the first and, still remains, the only encyclopedia covering Hinduism in all its diverse variety. The book is cited in almost every reputable bibliographic listing on books on religion in general and Hinduism in particular. Its impact went well beyond academic circles. For example, the Hindu dramatist S.S. Chauhan was inspired by the book to write a play on the iniquites of the caste system. His wife, Vijaya Chauhan wrote a novel on the same subject, spurred by Hindu World. The book also drew the attention of Pearl Binder (Lady Elwyn Jones), an authority on costume design, who thereafter sought Walker's help in her research on Indian tribal dress, colours, and textiles. Hinduism (Sanskrit: , , also known as , ) is a religion that originated on the Indian subcontinent. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Lady Elwyn-Jones née Pearl Binder (born 1904, died 1990). ... Lady Elwyn-Jones née Pearl Binder (born 1904, died 1990). ...


Bibliography: Published Books by Benjamin Walker

  • Persian Pageant: A Cultural History of Iran, Arya Press, Cacutta, 1950.
  • Angkor Empire: A History of the Khmer of Cambodia, Signet Press, Calcutta, 1995.
  • Hindu World: An Encyclopedic Survey of Hinduism, (Two Volumes), Allen & Unwin, London, 1968; Praeger, New York, 1968; Munshiram Manohar Lal, New Delhi, 1983; Harper Collins, New Delhi, 1985; Rupa, New Delhi, 2005, ISBN 81-291-0670-1.
  • Sex and the Supernatural: Sexuality in Religion and Magic, MacDonald, London, 1970; Harper & Row, New York, 1973, ISBN 0-06-087043-5; Fitzhenry, Toronto, 1973.
  • Beyond the Body: The Human Double, Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, 1974, ISBN 0-7100-7808-0; Fitzhenry, Toronto, 1974; Arkana, 1988, ISBN 0-14-019169-0.
  • Encyclopedia of Esoteric Man: The Hidden Side of the Human Entity, Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, 1977, ISBN 0-7100-8479-X.
  • Body Magic: Man and His Hidden Powers, Granada, London, 1977. ISBN 0-586-08323-5
  • Man and the Beasts Within: The Encyclopedia of the Occult, the Esoteric, and the Supernatural, Stein & Day, New York, 1978, ISBN 0-8128-1900-4.
  • Encyclopedia of the Occult, the Esoteric and the Supernatural, Stein & Day, New York, 1980, ISBN 0-8128-6051-9.
  • Masks of the Soul: The Facts Behind Reincarnation, Aquarian Press, London, 1981, ISBN 0-85030-258-7.
  • Tantrism: It's Secret Principles and Practices, Acquarian Press, London, 1982; Borgo Press, 1983, ISBN 0-85030-272-2.
  • Gnosticism: Its History and Influence, Crucible, London, 1989; Harper Collins, Reprint edition, 1990, ISBN 1-85274-057-4.
  • Foundations of Islam: The Making of a World Faith, Peter Owen Publishers, London and New York, 1978, ISBN 0-7206-1038-9; Harper Collins, New Dehli, 1999.
  • Caesar's Church: The Irrational in Science & Philosophy, Book Guild, Lewes, Sussex, 2001, ISBN 1-85776-625-3.

George Allen & Unwin Ltd. ... Collins was a Scottish printing company founded by a schoolmaster, William Collins, in Glasgow in 1819. ... Harper & Row is an imprint of HarperCollins. ... Routledge is an imprint for books in the humanities part of the Taylor & Francis Group, which also has Brunner-Routledge, RoutledgeCurzon and RoutledgeFalmer divisions. ... Routledge is an imprint for books in the humanities part of the Taylor & Francis Group, which also has Brunner-Routledge, RoutledgeCurzon and RoutledgeFalmer divisions. ... Routledge is an imprint for books in the humanities part of the Taylor & Francis Group, which also has Brunner-Routledge, RoutledgeCurzon and RoutledgeFalmer divisions. ... Collins was a Scottish printing company founded by a schoolmaster, William Collins, in Glasgow in 1819. ... Collins was a Scottish printing company founded by a schoolmaster, William Collins, in Glasgow in 1819. ...

Bibliography: Contributions to Part Works by Benjamin Walker

  • Man, Myth and Magic, Purnell, London, January 1970 - January 1971. Walker contributed the chapters on: Body, Eye, Kali, Karma, Kundalini, Madness, Mandala, Mantra, Meditation, Moon, Nirvana, Phallic Symbolism, Ramakrishna, Reincarnation, Self Denial, Tantrism, Taoism, Yoga.
  • Encyclopedia of the Unexplained, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1974. Walker contributed the entries entitled: Astral Body, Dreams, Karma, Mandala, Mantras, Mystery Religions, Physical Powers, Tantrism, Yoga.
  • Fate and Fortune, Michael Cavendish, London, 1974-1975. Walker contributed the chapters on: Karma, Kabala, Out-of-Body Experiences, Reincarnation, Tantrism.
  • Academic American Encyclopedia, Arete Publishing Co., Princeton, New Jersey, 1980. Walker contributor the entries entitled: Divination, Fortune Telling, Ghosts, Omens, Satanism, Voodoo, Witchcraft.

References

  • Who's Who in Europe, 1983 International Publication Service; 5th edition (April 1983), ISBN 2870610041
  • The Writers Directory, St. James Press; 2006 edition (July 1, 2005), ISBN 1558625518

External links

See also


 
 

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