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Encyclopedia > Benjamin Lincoln
Benjamin Lincoln
Benjamin Lincoln

In office
1788 – 1789
Governor John Hancock
Preceded by Thomas Cushing
Succeeded by Samuel Adams

Born January 24, 1733
Hingham, Massachusetts
Died May 9, 1810
Hingham, Massachusetts

Benjamin Lincoln (January 24, 1733May 9, 1810) was a American army officer. He served as a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He is notable for overseeing the largest US surrender of the war at Siege of Charleston and for being the officer who formally accepted the British surrender at Yorktown. Image File history File links Benjamin_lincoln_by_charles_wilson_peale. ... John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Hancock (January 23 [O.S. January 12] 1737– October 8, 1793) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation, the first Governor of Massachusetts, and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... Thomas Cushing (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... For other uses, see Samuel Adams (disambiguation). ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ... Hingham is a town in Plymouth County on the South Shore of Massachusetts. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Hingham is a town in Plymouth County on the South Shore of Massachusetts. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Continental Army was an army formed after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Combatants Kingdom of Great Britain United States Commanders Sir Henry Clinton and Mariot Arbuthnot Benjamin Lincoln Strength 14,000 troops 5,000 troops Casualties 76 killed, 182 wounded 92 killed, 148 wounded, 4,650 captured (see Trivia below) The Siege of Charleston was one of the major battles which took... Belligerents United States Kingdom of France Great Britain German Mercenaries Commanders George Washington Jean-Baptiste de Rochambeau François de Grasse Charles Cornwallis # Charles O’Hara # Strength 19,300 soldiers (10,800 French 8,500 Americans) 24 French warships 375 guns (see below) 7,500 240 guns Casualties and losses...

Contents

Early life

Birthplace of General Benjamin Lincoln in Hingham, Massachusetts. Photo from 1936.
Birthplace of General Benjamin Lincoln in Hingham, Massachusetts. Photo from 1936.

Lincoln was born on January 24, 1733, in Hingham, Massachusetts. Lincoln's ancestors were among those who first settled in Hingham, beginning with Lincoln family patriarch Samuel Lincoln. In his early life, Lincoln worked on the family farm; he attended the local school. Later in life, he felt the lack of further education and got a Master's degree at Harvard. In 1756, at the age of 23, Lincoln married Mary Cushing, whose ancestors were also among the founders of Hingham. They had eleven children. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4240x3184, 2495 KB) General Benjamin Lincoln House, Hingham, Plymouth County, MA. Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Nov. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4240x3184, 2495 KB) General Benjamin Lincoln House, Hingham, Plymouth County, MA. Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Nov. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ... Hingham is a town in Plymouth County on the South Shore of Massachusetts. ... Samuel Lincoln (date of birth unknown; baptised in Hingham, Norfolk, England, August 24, 1622; died in Hingham, Massachusetts, May 26, 1690), was the progenitor of a number of notable United States political figures, including his great, great, great, great grandson, President Abraham Lincoln, and Massachusetts Representatives Levi Lincoln, Sr. ...


He followed in his father's footsteps into local political office. At 21, Lincoln became the town constable and in 1755, Lincoln entered the 3rd Regiment of the Suffolk militia as an adjutant. In 1757, he was elected the town clerk of Hingham and was elected Justice of the Peace in 1762, also, in 1772, Lincoln was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the 3rd Regiment of the Suffolk militia. Being in the Suffolk militia allowed Lincoln to gain military experience which he used in three major battles of the American Revolution. In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ...


American Revolution

Northern Theatre (1776-78)

In 1776, he was promoted to brigadier general, then major general, then commander of all Massachusetts troops in the Boston area. After the British evacuation of Boston, Lincoln joined General George Washington at New York, commanding the right wing at the Battle of White Plains. Shortly after seeing action at Fort Independence, he was commissioned into the Continental Army as a major general. For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Boston redirects here. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... This article is about the state. ... Combatants United States Britain Commanders George Washington William Howe Strength 14,500 men 14,000 men Casualties 300 killed and wounded 313 killed and wounded Battle of White Plains Historic Site : George Washingtons HQ The Battle of White Plains was an inconclusive meeting on October 28, 1776 in the... Fort Independence is a fort in Missouri, United States. ...


In September of 1777, Lincoln joined Horatio Gates's camp near Saratoga to take part in the Battles of Saratoga. Lincoln's ankle was shattered by a musket ball during the Second Battle of Saratoga, permanently leaving him with one leg shorter than the other. Horatio Gates Horatio Lloyd Gates (1727–1806) was an American general during the Revolutionary War. ...

The honle. B. Lincoln, Esq., major general in the American Army. Etching from 1782.
The honle. B. Lincoln, Esq., major general in the American Army. Etching from 1782.

Download high resolution version (1144x1536, 451 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1144x1536, 451 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Southern Theatre (1778-81)

After recovering from the severe wound, Lincoln was appointed Southern Department Commander in September 1778. Lincoln participated in the attack on Savannah, Georgia on October 9, 1779 and was forced to retreat to Charleston, South Carolina. He took command of the garrison of Charleston. In March the city was surrounded by a sizeable British force despatched from the northern colonies. After a relatively brief siege Lincoln was forced to surrender to Lieutenant General Henry Clinton on May 12, 1780. is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Charleston may refer to: Charleston (dance) USS Charleston, the name of several ships of the United States Navy Charleston, novel by Alexandra Ripley Charleston (Texas Navy), a ship built for the Texas Navy In New Zealand: Charleston, New Zealand In Scotland: Charleston, Dundee, an area of Dundee Charleston, Angus, near... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Interestingly enough, Lincoln, desperate for more troops, had pleaded with the South Carolina legislature to arm 1,000 African Americans to ward off the approaching British. Rather than see armed slaves, the legislature began negotiations with the British commanders to allow the British forces to pass through South Carolina. This was one of the worst Continental defeats of the war. He was denied the honors of war in surrendering, which deeply rankled him. Lincoln was exchanged as a prisoner of war, was paroled, and in the court of inquiry no charges were ever brought against him. Ironically it was the British who subsequently adopted his policy of recruiting large numbers of black soldiers.


After being exchanged, Lincoln soon returned to Washington's main army, even leading it south to Virginia and playing a major role in the Yorktown surrender on October 19, 1781. Cornwallis surrendered on October 19, 1781 Lord Cornwallis pleading illness, did not attend the surrender ceremony instead, sending his second-in-command, the Irish General Charles O'Hara, in his stead. In response, General Washington refused to accept O'Hara's sword and sent his own subordinate, Benjamin Lincoln to recieve the surrender. This article is about the U.S. state. ... Combatants Britain Colonial America France Commanders Charles Cornwallis George Washington Comte de Rochambeau Strength 7,500 8,845 Americans 7,800 French Casualties 156 killed 326 wounded 7,018 captured Americans: 20 killed, 56 wounded French: 52 killed, 134 wounded The Battle of Yorktown (1781) was a victory by a... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... General Charles OHara (1740 – February 25, 1802) was a British military officer who surrended the sword of Lieutenant-General Charles Cornwallis at Yorktown, 1781, ending the American Revolutionary War, and served as Governor of Gibraltar. ...


Secretary of War (1781-83)

From 1781 to late 1783, Lincoln served as the first "Secretary of War," also called the "Secretary at War". He was appointed by the Confederation Congress under the Articles of Confederation.[1][2] He was suceeded in the post by Henry Knox. The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ... Henry Knox (July 25, 1750 – October 25, 1806) was an American bookseller from Boston who became the chief artillery officer of the Continental Army and later the nations first Secretary of War. ...


Post-war

In 1787, Lincoln was a member of the Massachusetts state convention that ratified the United States Constitution. Earlier in 1787, Lincoln helped put an end to an uprising of farmers known as Shays' Rebellion. The uprising, which led to calls for a stronger central U.S. government, ended when the militia under Major General Benjamin Lincoln attacked the rebels and forced them to surrender in February. Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Shays Rebellion was an armed uprising in Western Massachusetts from 1786 to 1787. ...


He stayed active in public life in various capacities, including a term as Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts and many years as the Collector of the Port of Boston. He retired from public life in 1809 and died in Hingham on May 9, 1810. John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Long Wharf in waterfront downtown Boston was once the main commercial wharf of the port, but is now used by ferries and cruise boats. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Legacy

Places named for Benjamin Lincoln:

Lincoln County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Lincoln County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Lincoln County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Lincoln County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Lincoln, Vermont Lincoln is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. ... Columbia, South Carolina Seen from across the Congaree River. ... Savannah redirects here. ...

References

External links

  • Benjamin Lincoln and the American Revolution
  • National Park Service Museum Collections
Political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Cushing
Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
1788-1789
Succeeded by
Samuel Adams
Thomas Cushing (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Samuel Adams (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lincoln County Kentucky (467 words)
Named in honor of Revolutionary Army Officer Benjamin Lincoln who was asked by Congress to conduct the war in the southern states.
The original territory of Lincoln comprised about one-third of the state but was reduced by cutting off sections to form other counties until its present area of 450 square miles.
Lincoln County is “The Land of Firsts.” It’s home of Kentucky’s first governor, Isaac Shelby; first chartered school in the state; first brick house in Kentucky; first courthouse west of the Alleghenies; first bank west of the Alleghenies; as well as America’s first circular race track.
Benjamin Lincoln - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (260 words)
Benjamin Lincoln (1733–1810) was a General on the American side in the American Revolutionary War.
Lincoln was born in Hingham, Massachusetts in 1733.
Lincoln moved south with General Washington and then was sent to the Northern Department to help against Maj. General John Burgoyne's campaign.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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