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Encyclopedia > Benjamin Hoadly
Benjamin Hoadly, painted by William Hogarth, c. 1743
Benjamin Hoadly, painted by William Hogarth, c. 1743

Benjamin Hoadly (16761761), was an English clergyman, who was successively bishop of Bangor, Hereford, Salisbury, and Winchester, famous for initiating the Bangorian Controversy. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2557, 396 KB) Description: Title: de: Porträt des Bischofs Benjamin Hoadly Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 125 × 100,5 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Tate Gallery Other... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2557, 396 KB) Description: Title: de: Porträt des Bischofs Benjamin Hoadly Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 125 × 100,5 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Tate Gallery Other... William Hogarth, self-portrait, 1745 William Hogarth (November 10, 1697 – October 26, 1764) was a major English painter, engraver, pictorial satirist, and editorial cartoonist who has been credited as a pioneer in western sequential art. ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my [birth]right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Bangor, in north Wales, UK, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... Hereford Cathedral Hereford (pronounced hěr-ə-füd or hěr-i-füd) Welsh: Henffordd (pronounced Henforth) is a city in the west of England, close to the border with Wales and on the River Wye. ... Salisbury Cathedral by Constable. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... The Bangorian Controversy was a theological argument within the Church of England in the 18th century. ...


He was educated at Cambridge University and ordained in 1701. He was rector of St. Peter-le-Poor, London, from 1704 to 1724. His participation in controversy began at the beginning of his career, when he advocated conformity of the religious rites from the Scottish and English churches for the sake of union. He became a leader of the low church and found favor from the Whig party. The University of Cambridge (often called Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... For other uses, see London (disambiguation) and Defining London (below). ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... The Church of Scotland (C of S, also known informally as The Kirk; until the 17th century officially the Kirk of Scotland) is the Christian national church of Scotland. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Low church is a term of distinction in the Church of England, initially designed to be pejorative. ... While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ...


He battled Francis Atterbury, spokesman for the high church group and Tory leader on the subject of passive obedience and non-resistance (i.e. obedience of divines that would not involve swearing allegiance or changing their eucharistic rites but would also not involve denunciation of the Established Church practices). The House of Commons, dominated by Whigs, recommended him to the Queen, and he became rector of Stretham in 1710. When George I acceded, he became chaplain to the king and made bishop of Bangor in 1716. Francis Atterbury (March 6, 1663 - February 22, 1732), was an English man of letters, politician and bishop. ... High Church is a term that may now be used in speaking of viewpoints within a number of denominations of Protestant Christianity in general, but it is one which has traditionally been employed in Churches associated with the Anglican tradition in particular. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In English history, the Established Church is the Church of England, the church which is established by the Government, supported by it, and of which the monarch is the titular head; until 1920 it also held the same position in Wales. ... British House of Commons Canadian House of Commons In some bicameral parliaments of a Westminster System, the House of Commons has historically been the name of the elected lower house. ... Anne Queen of Great Britain and Ireland Anne (6 February 1665–1 August 1714), became Queen of England and Scotland on 8 March 1702. ... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ... George I King of Great Britain and Ireland George I (George Ludwig von Guelph-dEste) (28 May 1660–11 June 1727) was Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) from 23 January 1698, and King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 1 August 1714, until his death. ... // Events August 5 - In the Battle of Peterwardein 40. ...


In 1717, his sermon on "The Nature of the Kingdom of Christ" provoked the Bangorian controversy. He was then translated three more times, taking up different bishoprics. He maintained that the eucharist was purely a commemorative act without any divine intervention (i.e. was purely consubstantial). During his time as bishop, he rarely even visited his dioceses and lived, instead, in London, where he was very active in politics. // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... The Eucharist or Communion or The Lords Supper, is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament, to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ... Consubstantiation is a theory which (like the competing theory of transubstantiation, with which it is often contrasted) attempts to describe the nature of the Christian Eucharist in terms of philosophical metaphysics. ...


William Hogarth (1697-1764) painted his portrait as Bishop of Winchester and "Prelate of the Most Noble Order of the Garter" about 1743, etched by Bernard Baron (1696-1762). William Hogarth, self-portrait, 1745 William Hogarth (November 10, 1697 – October 26, 1764) was a major English painter, engraver, pictorial satirist, and editorial cartoonist who has been credited as a pioneer in western sequential art. ... The Garter is the most recognizable insignia of the Order of the Garter. ...


Selected works

  • A Defence of the Reasonableness of Conformity (1707)
  • A Plain Account of the Nature and End of the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper (1735)
  • The Repeal of the Corporation and Test Acts (1736)
Preceded by:
John Evans
Bishop of Bangor
1715–1721
Succeeded by:
Richard Reynolds
Preceded by:
Phillip Bisse
Bishop of Hereford
1721–1723
Succeeded by:
Henry Egerton
Preceded by:
Richard Willis
Bishop of Salisbury
1723–1734
Succeeded by:
Thomas Sherlock
Preceded by:
Richard Willis
Bishop of Winchester
1734–1761
Succeeded by:
John Thomas

 
 

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