FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Benjamin Heath

Benjamin Heath (April 10, 1704 - September 13, 1766), English classical scholar and bibliophile, was born at Exeter. April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in England, UK. It is located at 50° 43′ 25″ N 3° 31′ 39″ W. In the 2001 census its population was recorded at 111,066. ...


He was the son of a wealthy merchant, and was thus able to devote himself mainly to travel and book-collecting. He became town clerk of his native city in 1752, and held the office till his death. In 1763 he had published a pamphlet advocating the repeal of the cider tax in Devonshire, and his endeavours led to success three years later. As a classical scholar he made his reputation by his critical and metrical notes on the Greek tragedians, which procured him an honorary DCL from Oxford (March 31, 1752). 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Tragedy is one of the oldest forms of drama. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


He also left manuscript notes on Burmann's and Martyn's editions of Virgil, on Euripides, Catullus, Tibullus, and the greater part of Hesiod. In some of these he adopts the whimsical name Dexiades Ericius. His Revisal of Shakespear's Text (1765) was an answer to the insolent dogmatism of Bishop Warburton. John Martyn (September 12, 1699 - January 29, 1768) was an English botanist. ... For other uses see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Euripides (c. ... Gaius Valerius Catullus (c. ... Albius Tibullus (c. ... Hesiod (Hesiodos) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, believed to have lived around the year 700 BCE. From the 5th century BCE, literary historians have debated the priority of Hesiod or of Homer. ... Dogma (the plural is either dogmata or dogmas) is belief or doctrine held by a religion or any kind of organization to be authoritative. ... William Warburton (December 24, 1698 - June 7, 1779), was an English critic and churchman, Bishop of Gloucester from 1759. ...


The Essay towards a Demonstrative Proof of the Divine Existence, Unity and Attributes (1740) was intended to combat the opinions of Voltaire, Rousseau and Hume. Two of his sons (among a family of thirteen) were Benjamin, headmaster of Harrow (1771-1785), and George, headmaster of Eton (1796). His collection of rare classical works formed the nucleus of his son Benjamin's famous library (Bibliotheca Heathiana). Voltaire François-Marie Arouet (November 21, 1694 – May 30, 1778), better known by the pen name Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, deist and philosopher. ... Jean-Jacques Rousseau Jean Jacques Rousseau (June 28, 1712 – July 2, 1778) was a Franco-Swiss philosopher, writer, political theorist, and self-taught composer of The Age of Enlightenment. ... David Hume David Hume (April 26, 1711 (May 7th by the Gregorian reckoning of his time, his birthday is celebrated by the International Humanist and Ethical Union on May 7th)– August 25, 1776) was a Scottish philosopher and historian and, with Adam Smith and Thomas Reid among others, one of... Harrow School Chapel Harrow School is a British public school, located in Harrow on the Hill, in North West London. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (that is, an independent, fee-charging secondary school) for boys. ...


An account of the Heath family will be found in Sir WR Drake's Heathiana (1882).


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Nicholas Heath - LoveToKnow 1911 (627 words)
His selection for this duty implies a readiness on Heath's part to proceed some distance along the path of reform; but his dealings with the Lutherans did not confirm this tendency, and Heath's subsequent career was closely associated with the cause of reaction.
Heath refused to accept it, was imprisoned, and in 1551 deprived of his bishopric.
He refused to crown Elizabeth because she would not have the coronation service accompanied with the elevation of the Host; and ecclesiastical ceremonies and doctrine could not, in Heath's view, be altered or abrogated by any mere national authority.
Benjamin Heath - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (285 words)
Benjamin Heath (April 10, 1704 - September 13, 1766), English classical scholar and bibliophile, was born at Exeter.
The Essay towards a Demonstrative Proof of the Divine Existence, Unity and Attributes (1740) was intended to combat the opinions of Voltaire, Rousseau and Hume.
Two of his sons (among a family of thirteen) were Benjamin, headmaster of Harrow (1771-1785), and George, headmaster of Eton (1796).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m