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Encyclopedia > Benjamin Harrison
Benjamin Harrison
Benjamin Harrison

In office
March 4, 1889 – March 4, 1893
Vice President(s) Levi P. Morton
Preceded by Grover Cleveland
Succeeded by Grover Cleveland

In office
March 4, 1881 – March 3, 1887
Preceded by Joseph E. McDonald
Succeeded by David Turpie

Born August 20, 1833(1833-08-20)
North Bend, Ohio
Died March 13, 1901 (aged 67)
Indianapolis, Indiana
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse Caroline Scott Harrison (1st wife)
Mary Scott Lord Dimmick (2nd wife)
Occupation Lawyer
Religion Presbyterian
Signature

Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833March 13, 1901) was the twenty-third President of the United States, serving one term from 1889 to 1893. He had previously served as a senator from Indiana. His administration is best known for a series of legislation including the McKinley Tariff and federal spending that reached one billion dollars. Democrats attacked the "Billion Dollar Congress" and defeated the GOP in the 1890 mid-term elections, as well as defeating Harrison's bid for reelection in 1892. He is to date the only president from Indiana. Benjamin Harrison was the 23rd President of the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2588x3282, 1015 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Benjamin Harrison George Washington Steele ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Joseph Ewing McDonald (August 29, 1819 - June 21, 1891) was a United States Representative and Senator from Indiana. ... David Battle Turpie (July 8, 1828 - April 21, 1909) was an American politician. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... North Bend is a village in Hamilton County, Ohio, along the Ohio River. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... The Republican Party of the United States was established in 1854 and is one of the two dominant parties today. ... White House portrait Caroline Lavinia Scott Harrison (October 1, 1832 _ October 25, 1892), wife of Benjamin Harrison, was First Lady of the United States from 1889 until her death. ... Mary Scott Lord Dimmick Harrison (April 30, 1858-January 5, 1948) was the second wife of the 23rd United States president Benjamin Harrison. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Image File history File links Benjamin_Harrison_signature. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... The McKinley Tariff of 1890 was what set the average ad valorem tariff rate for imports to the United States at 48. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The U.S. House election, 1890 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1890 which occurred in the middle of President Benjamin Harrisons term. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life and Civil War

A grandson of President William Henry Harrison and great-grandson of Benjamin Harrison, V, Benjamin was born on August 20, 1833, in North Bend, Hamilton County, Ohio, as the second of eight children of John Scott Harrison (later a U.S. Congressman from Ohio) and Elizabeth Ramsey Irwin. He attended Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, where he was a member of the fraternity Phi Delta Theta (later in life, he joined Delta Chi) and graduated in 1852. He studied law in Cincinnati, Ohio, then moved to Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1854. He was admitted to the bar and became reporter of the decisions of the Indiana Supreme Court. William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Benjamin Harrison V Benjamin Harrison, V (April 5, 1726 – April 24, 1791) was an American planter and revolutionary leader from Charles City County, Virginia. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... North Bend is a village in Hamilton County, Ohio, along the Ohio River. ... Hamilton County is a county in the located in the southwest corner of the state of Ohio, United States. ... John Scott Harrison (1804-1878) was an American Congressman who represented the second district of Ohio from 1853 to 1857. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Location of Oxford in Butler County, Ohio Oxford is a college town located in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Ohio in northwestern Butler County in Oxford Township, originally called the College Township. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Delta Chi (ΔΧ) (del-ta kai) or D-Chi is an international college social fraternity formed on October 13, 1890 at Cornell University initially as a professional fraternity for law students. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... The Supreme Court of Indiana is the highest court in the state of Indiana. ...

"Come on boys!" General Benjamin Harrison in the Battle of Resaca, May, 1864.
"Come on boys!" General Benjamin Harrison in the Battle of Resaca, May, 1864.

On October 20, 1853, Harrison, 20, married Caroline Lavinia Scott, 21, in Oxford, Ohio. The wedding was performed by her father, Rev. John W. Scott. The Harrisons had two children, Russell Benjamin Harrison (August 12, 1854 - December 13, 1936) and Mary "Mamie" Scott Harrison McKee (April 3, 1858 - October 28, 1930). On June 13, 1861, they suffered the tragedy of a miscarriage. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (785x1104, 207 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (785x1104, 207 KB) http://hdl. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William T. Sherman Joseph E. Johnston Strength Military Division of the Mississippi Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,747 2,800 The Battle of Resaca was part of the Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War. ... For other uses, see May (disambiguation). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... White House portrait Caroline Lavinia Scott Harrison (October 1, 1832 _ October 25, 1892), wife of Benjamin Harrison, was First Lady of the United States from 1889 until her death. ... Location of Oxford in Butler County, Ohio Oxford is a college town located in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Ohio in northwestern Butler County in Oxford Township, originally called the College Township. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Brig. Gen. Benjamin Harrison
Brig. Gen. Benjamin Harrison

Harrison served in the Union Army during the Civil War and was appointed Colonel of the 70th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment in August 1862. The unit performed reconnaissance duty and guarded railroads in Kentucky and Tennessee until Sherman's Atlanta Campaign in 1864. Harrison was brevetted as a brigadier general, and commanded a Brigade at Resaca, Cassville, New Hope Church, Lost Mountain, Kennesaw Mountain, Marietta, Peachtree Creek and Atlanta. Harrison was later transferred to the Army of the Cumberland and participated in the Siege of Nashville and the Grand Review in Washington D.C. before mustering out in 1865. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William T. Sherman, James B. McPherson, John M. Schofield, George H. Thomas Joseph E. Johnston; replaced in July by John B. Hood † Leonidas Polk Strength Military Division of the Mississippi (Army of the Cumberland, Army of the Ohio, Army of... In the US military, brevet referred to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William T. Sherman Joseph E. Johnston Strength Military Division of the Mississippi Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,747 2,800 The Battle of Resaca was part of the Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War. ... Cassville, Georgia, is a community located in Bartow County in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... The Battle of New Hope Church was fought on May 25 and May 26 of 1864 between Shermans Union force and Johnstons Confederate force. ... Battle of Kennesaw Mountain Conflict American Civil War Date June 27, 1864 Place Kennesaw, Georgia Result Confederate victory The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain was fought on June 27, 1864 during the Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Marietta of the American Civil War was fought from 9 June through 3 July of 1864 in Cobb County, Georgia between Union and Confederate forces. ... Battle of Peachtree Creek Conflict American Civil War Date July 20, 1864 Place Fulton County, Georgia Result Union victory The Battle of Peachtree Creek was a battle of the American Civil War, fought in Georgia on July 20, 1864. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William T. Sherman James B. McPherson† John B. Hood Strength Military Division of the Mississippi Army of Tennessee Casualties 3,641 8,499 The Battle of Atlanta was a battle of the Atlanta Campaign fought during the American Civil War... Union army in the west during the American Civil War, commanded at various times by Generals Robert Anderson, Don Carlos Buell, William S. Rosecrans, and George Thomas. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George H. Thomas John Bell Hood Strength IV Corps, XXIII Corps, detachment of Army of the Tennessee, provisional detachment, and Cavalry Corps Army of Tennessee Casualties 2,900 approximately 13,000 The Battle of Nashville was a two-day battle... The Grand Review of the Armies was a military procession and celebration in Washington, D.C., on May 23 and May 24, 1865, following the close of the American Civil War. ...


Politics

While in the field in October 1864, he was elected reporter of the Indiana State Supreme Court and served four years. He was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for Governor of Indiana in 1876, being defeated by James D. Williams. He was appointed a member of the Mississippi River Commission, in 1879, and elected as a Republican to the United States Senate, where he served from March 4, 1881, to March 4, 1887. He was chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Transportation Routes to the Seaboard (47th Congress) and U.S. Senate Committee on Territories (48th and 49th Congresses). The Supreme Court of Indiana is the highest court in the state of Indiana. ... The Republican Party of the United States was established in 1854 and is one of the two dominant parties today. ... List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ... James Douglas Williams (January 16, 1808 November 20, 1880) was an American politician, most notable as the governor of Indiana from 1877 to 1880. ... The United States Army Corps of Engineers Mississippi Valley Division (MVD) and the complementary Mississippi River Commission (MRC) are responsible for maintaining the Mississippi River as a navigable waterway while preventing flooding. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... The Committee on Transportation Routes to the Seaboard, was a standing committee of the United States Senate from 1879-1921[1]. It was first established as a select committee December 16, 1872, until it became a standing committee on March 19, 1879. ... Dates of Sessions 1881-1883 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 5, 1881 to August 8, 1882. ... The United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources has jurisdiction over matters related to energy and nuclear waste policy, territorial policy, native Hawaiian matters, and public lands. ... Dates of Sessions 1883-1885 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 3, 1883 to July 7, 1884. ... Senators Representatives Categories: Articles to be expanded | United States politics stubs | United States Congress by session ...


Presidency 1889-1893

Inauguration of Benjamin Harrison, March 4, 1889.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (795x755, 158 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (795x755, 158 KB) http://hdl. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Policies

The Raven
An 1890 Puck cartoon depicts Harrison at his desk wearing his grandfather's hat which is too big for his head, suggesting that he is not fit for the presidency. Atop a bust of William Henry Harrison, a raven with the head of Secretary of State James G. Blaine gawks down at the President, a reference to the famous Edgar Allan Poe poem "The Raven." Blaine and Harrison were both at odds over the recently proposed McKinley Tariff.

After beating John Sherman for the Republican presidential nomination, Harrison was elected President of the United States in 1888 in notoriously fraudulent balloting in New York and Indiana (See Blocks of Five). In the Presidential election, Harrison received nearly 100,000 fewer popular votes than incumbent President Grover Cleveland but carried the Electoral College 233 to 168. Although Harrison had made no political bargains, his supporters had given innumerable pledges upon his behalf. When Boss Matthew Quay of Pennsylvania heard that Harrison ascribed his narrow victory to Providence, Quay exclaimed that Harrison would never know "how close a number of men were compelled to approach...the penitentiary to make him President." He was inaugurated on March 4, 1889, and served through March 4, 1893. Harrison was also known as the "centennial president" because his inauguration was the 100th anniversary of the inauguration of George Washington. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 364 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (523 × 862 pixel, file size: 148 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 364 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (523 × 862 pixel, file size: 148 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... The cover of the April 23, 1884 issue. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... For other uses, see The Raven (disambiguation). ... The McKinley Tariff of 1890 was what set the average ad valorem tariff rate for imports to the United States at 48. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... The Blocks of Five were groups of electors whose selling of their votes to the United States Republican Party for voting in the United States presidential election, 1888 was exposed. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... This article is about Electoral Colleges in general. ... Matthew Stanley Quay (September 30, 1833 - May 28, 1904) was an immensely powerful Pennsylvania political boss; kingmaker (Benjamin Harrison, 1888). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) commanded Americas war for independence (1775–1783), and was the first President of the United States, from 1789 to 1797. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


For Harrison, Civil Service reform was a no-win situation. Congress was split so far apart on the issue that agreeing to any measure for one side would alienate the other. The issue became a popular political football of the time and was immortalized in a cartoon captioned "What can I do when both parties insist on kicking?" (featured below) The Roman civil service in action. ... President Harrison political cartoon: What can I do when both parties insist on kicking? Political Football was also the name of a documentary about the rugby union 1971 Springbok tour to Australia. ...

Political football "What can I do when both parties insist on kicking?"
Political football "What can I do when both parties insist on kicking?"

Harrison was proud of the vigorous foreign policy which he helped shape. The first Pan-American Congress met in Washington, D.C. in 1889, establishing an information center which later became the Pan American Union. At the end of his administration, Harrison submitted to the Senate a treaty to annex Hawaii; to his disappointment, President Cleveland later withdrew it. Image File history File links Harrison_Football_Political_Cartoon. ... Image File history File links Harrison_Football_Political_Cartoon. ... President Harrison political cartoon: What can I do when both parties insist on kicking? Political Football was also the name of a documentary about the rugby union 1971 Springbok tour to Australia. ... The term Pan-American Congress can refer to: 1826: Congress of Panama 1889–1890: First International Conference of American States (See Organization of American States and Benjamin Harrison) A congress arranged by James G. Blaine (possibly the same as the above) This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Headquarters Washington, D.C. Official languages English, French, Spanish, Portuguese Membership 35 countries Leaders  -  Secretary General José Miguel Insulza (since 26 May 2005) Establishment  -  Charter first signed 30 April 1948 in effect 1 December 1951  Website http://www. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


The most perplexing domestic problem Harrison faced was the tariff issue. The high tariff rates in effect had created a surplus of money in the Treasury. Low-tariff advocates argued that the surplus was hurting business. Republican leaders in Congress successfully met the challenge. Representative William McKinley and Senator Nelson W. Aldrich framed a still higher tariff bill; some rates were intentionally prohibitive. Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        For other uses of this word, see tariff (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich (November 6, 1841 - April 16, 1915) was an American politician. ...


Harrison tried to make the tariff more acceptable by writing in reciprocity provisions. To cope with the Treasury surplus, the tariff was removed from imported raw sugar; sugar growers within the United States were given two cents per pound bounty on their production. This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely traded commodity. ...


In an attempt to battle trusts and monopolies, Harrison signed into effect the Sherman Anti-Trust Act in order to protect trade and commerce. This was the first Federal act of its kind.

President Harrison rowed ashore at Wall Street, April 29, 1889.
President Harrison rowed ashore at Wall Street, April 29, 1889.

Long before the end of the Harrison Administration, the Treasury surplus had evaporated and prosperity seemed about to disappear. Congressional elections in 1890 went against the Republicans, and party leaders decided to abandon President Harrison, although he had cooperated with Congress on party legislation. Nevertheless, his party renominated him in 1892, but he was defeated by Cleveland. Just two weeks earlier, on October 25, 1892, Harrison's wife, Caroline died after a long battle with tuberculosis. Their daughter, Mary Harrison McKee, continued the duties of the First Lady. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 476 pixel Image in higher resolution (3180 × 1894 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 476 pixel Image in higher resolution (3180 × 1894 pixel, file size: 1. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Mary Scott Harrison McKee (April 3, 1858 – October 28, 1930) was the first lady to her father President Benjamin Harrison,when her mother Caroline Harrison was seriously ill and then died. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ...


Significant events

John Sherman The Sherman Antitrust Act (Sherman Act[1], July 2, 1890, ch. ... The Sherman Silver Purchase Act was an 1890 United States federal law. ... The McKinley Tariff of 1890 was what set the average ad valorem tariff rate for imports to the United States at 48. ... The Ocala Demands was a platform for economic and political reform that was later adopted by the Peoples Party. ... Combatants Sioux United States Commanders Big Foot† James W. Forsyth Strength 120 men 230 women and children 500 men Casualties 178 killed 89 wounded 150 missing For other uses, see Wounded Knee (disambiguation). ...

Administration and Cabinet

Official White House portrait of Benjamin Harrison
Official White House portrait of Benjamin Harrison
President Benjamin Harrison

Portrait of Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901). ... Portrait of Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901). ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 514 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (833 × 972 pixel, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 514 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (833 × 972 pixel, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State John W. Foster John Watson Foster (March 2, 1836 – November 15, 1917) was an American military man, journalist and diplomat. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... William Windom (May 10, 1827–January 29, 1891) was an American politician. ... Charles Foster Charles Foster (April 12, 1828–January 9, 1904) was a U.S. Republican politician from Ohio. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Redfield Proctor (June 1, 1831–March 4, 1908) was an American politician in the Republican Party. ... Stephen Benton Elkins (September 26, 1841 - January 4, 1911) was an American industrialist and political figure. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... William Henry Harrison Miller (September 6, 1840&ndsah;May 25, 1917) was an American lawyer and Attorney General of the United States. ... The Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... John Wanamaker (July 11, 1838 – December 12, 1922) was a United States businessman, civic and political figure, considered the father of modern advertising. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Benjamin Franklin Tracy (1830-1915) was a United States political figure who served as Secretary of the Navy from March 6, 1889 - March 4, 1893, during the administration of President Benjamin Harrison. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... John Willock Noble (1831 - 1912) was a U.S. lawyer. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... Jeremiah McLain Rusk (June 17, 1830 - November 21, 1893) was the 15th Governor of the U.S. state of Wisconsin from 1882 to 1889. ...

Supreme Court appointments

Harrison appointed the following Justices to the Supreme Court of the United States: Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the...

turd fergison 1644 David Josiah Brewer (January 20, 1837-March 28, 1910), was an American jurist. ... Henry Billings Brown (born South Lee, Massachusetts March 2, 1836 - died Bronxville, New York September 4, 1913) was a Republican United States Supreme Court justice from January 5, 1891 to May 28, 1906. ... Justice Shiras, 1900 George Shiras, Jr. ... Howell Edmunds Jackson (April 8, 1832–August 8, 1895) was an American jurist and politician. ...


States admitted to the Union

Grave of President Harrison and his two wives in Indianapolis, Indiana.

When North and South Dakota were admitted to the Union, Harrison covered the tops of the bills and shuffled them so that he could only see the bottom. Thus, it is impossible to tell which was signed first, and which was the 39th and the 40th. Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ...


Harrison also made a push to have Hawaii annexed by the United States, but the annextion was not completed until after Harrison's time in office.


Post-presidency

After he left office, Harrison returned to Indianapolis. He married a widow, Mary Scott Lord Dimmick, on April 6, 1896, in New York City. She was also his deceased wife's niece. His two adult children, Russell, 41 years old at the time, and Mary "Mamie", 38, did not attend the wedding because they disagreed. Their mother had only died three and a half years earlier. Benjamin and Mary had one child, Elizabeth (February 21, 1897 - December 26, 1955), who later married James Blaine Walker, a grandnephew of James G. Blaine. Their daughter, Jane Harrison Walker, later married Newell Garfield, the great-grandson of President James A. Garfield and his wife Lucretia Garfield and the grandson of James R. Garfield. Harrison went to the First Peace Conference at The Hague. He served as an attorney for the Republic of Venezuela in the boundary dispute between Venezuela and the United Kingdom in 1900. He also wrote a book entitled This Country of Ours about the federal government and the presidency. Mary Scott Lord Dimmick Harrison (April 30, 1858-January 5, 1948) was the second wife of the 23rd United States president Benjamin Harrison. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was a major general in the United States Army, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and the twentieth President of the United States. ... White House portrait Lucretia Rudolph Garfield (1832 - 1918), wife of James A. Garfield, was First Lady of the United States in 1881. ... James Rudolph Garfield (October 17, 1865-March 24, 1950) U.S. politician, born in Hiram, Ohio, He was the second of five children born to President James A. Garfield and First Lady Lucretia Garfield. ... The Hague Conventions were international treaties negotiated at the First and Second Peace Conferences at The Hague, Netherlands in 1899 and 1907, respectively, and were, along with the Geneva Conventions, among the first formal statements of the laws of war and war crimes in the nascent body of international law. ... Hague redirects here. ...


Harrison developed the flu and a bad cold in February 1901. Despite treatment by steam vapor inhalation, Harrison's condition only worsened. Benjamin Harrison eventually died from influenza and pneumonia on Wednesday, March 13, 1901 and is interred in Crown Hill Cemetery. Incidentially, Crown Hill Cemetery also holds the remains of three United States Vice-Presidents: Charles W. Fairbanks, Thomas A. Hendricks, and Thomas R. Marshall. Influenza, commonly known as flu, is an infectious disease of birds and mammals caused by RNA viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae (the influenza viruses). ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Crown Hill Cemetery, located at 700 West 38th Street in Indianapolis, is the third largest cemetery in the United States at 555 acres (2. ... Crown Hill Cemetery, located at 700 West 38th Street in Indianapolis, is the third largest cemetery in the United States at 555 acres (2. ... Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-sixth Vice President of the United States. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ...


Legacy

  • The Benjamin Harrison Law School in Indianapolis was named in his honor. In 1944, Indiana University acquired the school and renamed it Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis.
    Benjamin Harrison stamp
    Benjamin Harrison stamp
  • At Miami University, Harrison Hall houses the political science department and the Harrison Scholarship is school's most prestigious academic award. [1]
  • In 1942, a United States Liberty ship named the SS Benjamin Harrison was launched. She was torpedoed and scuttled in 1943.
  • A U.S. Army post, Fort Benjamin Harrison, was established after Harrison's death in Indianapolis, but it was closed in the 1990s.
  • Harrison Hall, a co-educational dormitory at Purdue University, is named after President Harrison, who served on the Board of Trustees of Purdue University from July, 1895 to March, 1901.
  • The Benjamin Harrison Memorial Drawbridge over the James River in Virginia is one of the longest vertical lift bridges in the North America at 363 feet at its longest span.

→ Indiana University School of Medicine → Purdue University Indianapolis Extension Center → Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis → Indiana University School of Dentistry Type of institution Public Endowment $389. ... Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis [1] is part of Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI) located in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Image File history File links BenjaminHarrisonUSpostageStamp12cents. ... Image File history File links BenjaminHarrisonUSpostageStamp12cents. ... The Liberty ships were cargo ships built in the United States during World War II. They were cheap and quick to build, and came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output. ... The SS Benjamin Harrison (Hull Number 25) was a Liberty ship built in the United States during World War 2. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Fort Benjamin Harrison was a U.S. Army post located on the northeast side of Indianapolis, Indiana, named for the 23rd United States President Benjamin Harrison. ... Purdue redirects here. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see March (disambiguation). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Benjamin Harrison Memorial Bridge, on the James River near Hopewell, Virginia The Benjamin Harrison Memorial Bridge carries Virginia State Highway 156 across the James River between Jordans Point in Prince George County and Charles City County near the independent city of Hopewell, Virginia in the United States. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

Trivia

William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), was an American politician and the fourth President of the United States (1809–1817), and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The earliest method of recording and reproducing sound was on phonograph cylinders. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... Edgar Allan Poe grew a moustache later in his life. ... The year 1968 in film involved some significant events. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band is a 1968 film based on the novel Nebraska by Laura Bower Van Nuys. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Oh, Benjamin Harrison is a song written by Richard M. Sherman & Robert B. Sherman, also known as the Sherman Brothers. The song is from the Walt Disney musical film: The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band which premiered in 1968. ... Robert B. Sherman & Richard M. Sherman at the London Palladium in 2002 during the premiere of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Stage Musical. ... Electricity (from New Latin Ä“lectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ... Sign warning of possible electric shock hazard An electric shock can occur upon contact of a humans body with any source of voltage high enough to cause sufficient current flow through the muscles or hair. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the sport. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... John Alexander Anderson (June 26, 1834 - May 18, 1892) was a U.S. Congressman from Kansas (1879-1891), and the second President of Kansas State Agricultural College (1873-1879). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... Whitelaw Reid Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor, as well as the author of a popular history of Ohio in the Civil War. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... The Farmer School of Business at Miami University is the 12th best public undergraduate business school according to Business Week. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Emma Fanchon Faust Tillman (November 22, 1892 - January 28, 2007) was, at age 114, the oldest validated living person in the world. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...

Media

Recording of Harrison Benjamin Harrison speech. ...

The only known recording of President Harrison, made around 1889 by Giuseppe Bettini.

Problems listening to the file? See media help.

See also

Indiana Portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Indiana. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... // Era Overview At the end of the Civil War, the United States was still bitterly divided. ...

References

Secondary sources

  • Charles W. Calhoun, Benjamin Harrison (2005), short biography
  • Davis R. Dewey. National Problems: 1880-1897 (1907)
  • H. Wayne Morgan, From Hayes to McKinley: National Party Politics, 1877-1896 (1969)
  • Harry J.Sievers, Benjamin Harrison: v1 Hoosier Warrior, 1833-1865; v2: Hoosier Statesman From The Civil War To The White House 1865-1888 (1959); v3: Benjamin Harrison. Hoosier President. The White House and After (1968) the major scholarly biography
  • Homer E. Socolofsky, The Presidency of Benjamin Harrison (1987) (ISBN 0-7006-0320-4) detailed narrative of 1888-92

Primary sources

External links

Wikisource
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Benjamin Harrison
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Benjamin Harrison
Political offices
Preceded by
Grover Cleveland
President of the United States
March 4, 1889 – March 4, 1893
Succeeded by
Grover Cleveland
United States Senate
Preceded by
Joseph E. McDonald
Senator from Indiana (Class 1)
March 4, 1881 – March 3, 1887
Served alongside: Daniel W. Voorhees
Succeeded by
David Turpie
Party political offices
Preceded by
James G. Blaine
Republican Party presidential candidate
1888, 1892
Succeeded by
William McKinley
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Rutherford B. Hayes
Oldest U.S. President still living
January 17, 1893 – March 13, 1901
Succeeded by
Grover Cleveland
Persondata
NAME Harrison, Benjamin
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION 23rd President of the United States
DATE OF BIRTH August 20, 1833
PLACE OF BIRTH North Bend, Ohio
DATE OF DEATH March 13, 1901, age 67
PLACE OF DEATH Indianapolis, Indiana

  Results from FactBites:
 
President Benjamin Harrison Museum (508 words)
Benjamin Harrison was the 23rd President of the United States from 1889 to 1893.
Benjamin Harrison lived in the home until his death in 1901, except for the years he spent in Washington, D. In 1876 Harrison ran for Governor of Indiana.
Harrison genealogy, the presidency of the United States, Indiana history and the Victorian era are among topics of the remainder of the book collections.
Benjamin Harrison - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1517 words)
A grandson of President William Henry Harrison and great-grandson of Benjamin Harrison V, Benjamin was born on August 20, 1833, in North Bend, Hamilton County, Ohio as the second of eight children of John Scott Harrison (later a U.S. Congressman from Ohio) and Elizabeth Ramsey Irwin.
Harrison served in the Union Army during the Civil War, and was appointed Commander of the 70th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment in August of 1862.
Benjamin Harrison VI eventually died from influenza and pneumonia on Wednesday, March 13, 1901 and is interred in Crown Hill Cemetery.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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