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Encyclopedia > Benjamin Franklin Butler (politician)
Benjamin Franklin Butler
Benjamin Franklin Butler (politician)

In office
January 4, 1883 – January 3, 1884
Lieutenant(s) Oliver Ames
Preceded by John Davis Long
Succeeded by George D. Robinson

Born November 5, 1818
Deerfield, New Hampshire, USA
Died January 11, 1893
Washington, D.C., USA
Political party Democrat, Greenback
Spouse Sarah Hildreth
Profession Politician, Lawyer

Benjamin Franklin Butler (November 5, 1818January 11, 1893) was an American lawyer and politician who represented Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and later served as its governor. During the American Civil War, his administration of occupied New Orleans, his policies regarding slaves as "contrabands", his ineffectual leadership in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign, and the fiasco of Fort Fisher rank him as one of the most controversial "political generals" of the war. He was widely reviled for years after the war by Southern whites, who gave him the nickname "Beast Butler". Image File history File links BenFrankButler. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Oliver Ames (February 4, 1831 - October 22, 1895) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Davis Long (October 27, 1838–August 28, 1915) was a U.S. political figure. ... George Dexter Robinson (born George Washington Robinson) (January 20, 1834–February 22, 1896) was born in Lexington, Massachusetts. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Location Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Government Country State County United States New Hampshire Rockingham County Incorporated 1766 Board of Selectmen James Alexander, Chairman R. Andrew Robertson Joseph E. Stone John Reagan Stephen R. Barry Geographical characteristics Area 135. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Federal District District of Columbia Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D) City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack Evans... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Greenback Party (Greenback-Labor Party) was an American political party that was active between 1874 and 1884. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is the lower of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot, NOLA (acronym for New Orleans, LA) Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718 Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area    - City 350. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into slavery. ... Contraband was the terminology used by Brigadier General Benjamin Butler, commander at Fort Monroe in southeastern Virginia, at the outset of the American Civil War to describe a new status for certain escaped slaves. ... Federal earthworks at Bermuda Hundred The Bermuda Hundred Campaign was a series of battles fought outside Richmond, Virginia, during May, 1864, in the American Civil War. ... First Battle of Fort Fisher Conflict American Civil War Date December 7-27, 1864 Place New Hanover County, North Carolina Result Confederate victory The First Battle of Fort Fisher was a failed attempt by Union forces to capture the fort guarding Wilmington, North Carolina, the Souths last major port... A Political general was a general during the US Civil War who was given a high position in command due to political connections or to appease certain political blocks. ...

Contents

Early life

Butler was born in Deerfield, New Hampshire, the son of Captain John Butler, who served under Andrew Jackson in the War of 1812 (during the Battle of New Orleans). He was named after Founding Father Benjamin Franklin. After the death of his father, his mother operated a boarding house in Lowell, Massachusetts. He attended Waterville College (now Colby College) in Maine and graduated in 1838. He was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1840, began practice at Lowell, and soon attained distinction as a lawyer, particularly in criminal cases. He married Sarah Hildreth, a stage actress and daughter of Dr. Israel Hildreth of Lowell, in 1842. (After the Civil War their daughter married Adelbert Ames, who served as a prominent U.S. Army general during the conflict). Location Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Government Country State County United States New Hampshire Rockingham County Incorporated 1766 Board of Selectmen James Alexander, Chairman R. Andrew Robertson Joseph E. Stone John Reagan Stephen R. Barry Geographical characteristics Area 135. ... This article is 45 kilobytes or more in size. ... Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain, Canadian provincial forces Native Americans First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn George Prevost Tecumseh† Isaac Brock† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other vessels... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Sir Edward Pakenham† John Lambert Alexander Cochrane Andrew Jackson Strength 8,000 men 3,500-4,000 men Casualties 385 killed 1,186 wounded 484 captured 13 killed 58 wounded 30 captured The Battle of New Orleans, also known as the Battle of Chalmette... Founding Fathers are persons instrumental not only in the establishment (founding) of a political institution, but also in the origination of the idea of the institution. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ...   Settled: 1653 â€“ Incorporated: 1826 Zip Code(s): 01852 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is one of the United States of Americas oldest independent liberal arts colleges. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... Adelbert Ames (October 31, 1835 – April 12, 1933) was a Union general in the American Civil War, a Mississippi politician, and a general in the Spanish-American War. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ...


Entering politics as a Democrat, Butler first attracted general attention by his vigorous campaign in Lowell advocating the passage of a law establishing a ten-hour day for laborers. He was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1853, and of the Massachusetts Senate in 1859, and was a delegate to the Democratic National Conventions from 1848 to 1860. In the convention of 1860 at Charleston, South Carolina, he advocated the nomination of Jefferson Davis (voting for him on the first fifty-seven ballots) and opposed Stephen A. Douglas, and in the ensuing campaign he supported John C. Breckinridge. His military career prior to the Civil War began with him as a third lieutenant in the Massachusetts Militia in 1839; he was promoted to brigadier general of the militia in 1855. These ranks were closely associated with his political positions and Butler received little practical military experience to prepare him for the coming conflict. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts Senate is the upper house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... The 1860 Democratic National Convention was one of the key events prior to the American Civil War. ... Nickname: The Holy City, The Palmetto City Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American statesman who was President of the Confederate States of America, for its entire history from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 – June 3, 1861), known as the Little Giant, was an American politician from the frontier state of Illinois, and was one of two Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860, along with John C. Breckenridge. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ...


Civil War

General Benjamin Franklin Butler
General Benjamin Franklin Butler

Governor John A. Andrew sent Butler with a force of Massachusetts troops to reopen communication between the Union states and Washington, D.C. A major railroad connection from the Northeast passed through Baltimore and immediately after the start of the war it was unclear whether Maryland would stay in the Union. Butler arrived with the 8th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment by steamer at Annapolis on April 20, 1861. He employed his expert negotiation skills with the Governor of Maryland and, by April 22, his regiment had disembarked and was put to work repairing damaged railroad tracks around Baltimore. At the same time, the 7th New York Infantry arrived and Butler assumed command of the entire force; his military career would be characterized by his eagerness to assume authority in the absence of official instructions. While Butler remained at Annapolis, the New Yorkers were the first Union troops to march into Washington following President Lincoln's initial call for volunteers. On May 13, Butler's remaining force occupied Baltimore without opposition. Lincoln appointed him the first major general of U.S. Volunteers, ranking from May 16, 1861. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2216x3992, 609 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Benjamin Franklin Butler (politician) Portal:American Civil War/Selected biography/49 ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2216x3992, 609 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Benjamin Franklin Butler (politician) Portal:American Civil War/Selected biography/49 ... John Albion Andrew (1818 - 1867) was a U.S. political figure. ... The Union was a name used by many to refer to the Northern states during the American Civil War. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Federal District District of Columbia Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D) City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack Evans... Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more, Balmerr,Bodymore, Murderland Motto: The Greatest City in America (formerly The City That Reads; Get In On It is not the citys motto, but rather the advertising slogan of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association; BELIEVE is not the... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,417 sq mi (32,160 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... Nickname: Americas Sailing Capital , San Diego East, Dogtown, Naptown Motto: Vixi Liber Et Moriar - I have lived, and I shall die, free Location in Maryland Coordinates: Country United States State Maryland County Anne Arundel County Founded 1649 Incorporated 1708 Mayor Ellen O. Moyer (D) City Council Richard E. Israel... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The following is a list of all Governors of Maryland. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


Assigned command of Fort Monroe in Virginia, Butler declined to return to their owners fugitive slaves who had come within his lines, on the grounds that, as laborers for fortifications, and so on, they were contraband of war, thereby justifying granting these slaves a relative freedom, in spite of the Fugitive Slave Law. The U.S. Congress later mandated that other Union commanders refuse to return slaves to their erstwhile masters. In the conduct of tactical operations, Butler was almost uniformly unsuccessful, and his first action at Big Bethel, Virginia, was a humiliating defeat for the Union Army. He was also head of the Department of Virginia. Satellite Photo of Fort Monroe Fort Monroe, Virginia (also known as Fortress Monroe) is a military installation located at Old Point Comfort on the tip of the Virginia Peninsula at the mouth of Hampton Roads on the Chesapeake Bay in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... In the history of slavery in the United States, a fugitive slave was a slave who had escaped his or her masters often with the intention of traveling to a place where the state of his or her enslavement was either illegal or not enforced. ... Contraband was the terminology used by Brigadier General Benjamin Butler, commander at Fort Monroe in southeastern Virginia, at the outset of the American Civil War to describe a new status for certain escaped slaves. ... An April 24, 1851 poster warning colored people in Boston about policemen acting as slave catchers. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Military tactics (Greek: TaktikÄ“, the art of organizing an army) is the collective name for methods of engaging and defeating an enemy in battle. ... -1... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ...


Later, in 1861, Butler commanded an expeditionary force that, in conjunction with the U.S. Navy, took Forts Hatteras and Clark in North Carolina. In May 1862, he commanded the force that occupied New Orleans after it was captured by the Navy. In the administration of that city he showed great firmness and severity. New Orleans was unusually healthy and orderly during the Butler regime. Many of his acts, however, gave great offense, such as the seizure of $800,000 that had been deposited in the office of the Dutch consul. Most notorious was Butler's General Order No. 28 of May 15, issued after some provocation, that if any woman should insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded and shall be held liable to be treated as a "woman of the town plying her avocation", i.e., a prostitute. This order provoked protests both in the North and the South, and also abroad, particularly in England and France, and it was doubtless the cause of his removal from command of the Department of the Gulf on December 17, 1862. The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Battle of Hatteras Inlet Batteries Conflict American Civil War Date August 28-29, 1861 Place Dare County, North Carolina Result Union victory The Battle of Hatteras Inlet Batteries, also known as the Battle of Forts Clark and Hatteras, took place from August 28-29, 1861 in Dare County, North Carolina... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Consul (abbrev. ... General Benjamin Franklin Butler established himself as military commander in New Orleans, May 1, 1862. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Southern United States. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


On June 7 he had executed one William B. Mumford, who had torn down a United States flag placed by Admiral Farragut on the United States Mint in New Orleans; for this execution, he was denounced (December 1862) by Confederate President Jefferson Davis in General Order 111 as a felon deserving capital punishment, who if captured should be reserved for execution. June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... William B. Mumford was a North Carolina native and resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, who was hanged for tearing down the United States flag during the American Civil War. ... Flag ratio: 10:19; nicknames: Stars and Stripes, Old Glory The flag of the United States of America consists of thirteen equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white; there is a blue rectangle in the upper hoist-side corner bearing 50 small, white, five-pointed stars... Admiral David Glasgow Farragut Admiral David Glasgow Farragut David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801 – August 14, 1870) was the senior officer of the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. ... A postcard dated 12 July 1907 showing the New Orleans Mint during its last few years of operation as a branch mint facility. ... The President of the Confederate States was the Head of State of the short-lived republic of the Confederate States of America, which seceded from the United States. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American statesman who was President of the Confederate States of America, for its entire history from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ...


In November 1863, Butler commanded the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, and, in May 1864, the forces under his command were designated the Army of the James. He was ordered to attack in the direction of Petersburg from the east, destroying the rail links supplying Richmond and distracting Robert E. Lee, in conjunction with attacks from the north by Ulysses S. Grant. Grant had little use for Butler's military skills, but Butler had strong political connections that kept him in positions beyond his competence. Rather than striking immediately at Petersburg as ordered, Butler's offensive bogged down east of Richmond in the area called the Bermuda Hundred, immobilized by the greatly inferior force of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard, and he was unable to accomplish any of his assigned objectives. But it was his mismanagement of the expedition against Fort Fisher, North Carolina, that finally led to his recall by General Grant in December. He resigned his commission on November 30, 1865. The Army of the James was a Union Army that was composed of unites from the Department of Virginia and North Carolina and served along the James River during the last opperations of the Civil War in Virginia. ... Location Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates , Government Country State County United States Virginia Independent city Founded December 17, 1748 Mayor Annie M. Mickens Geographical characteristics Area     City 60. ... Nickname: The River City Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (D) Area    - City 62. ... For the author of Inherit the Wind and other works, see Robert Edwin Lee. ... Ulysses S. Grant[1] (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and politician who was elected as the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Federal earthworks at Bermuda Hundred The Bermuda Hundred Campaign was a series of battles fought outside Richmond, Virginia, during May, 1864, in the American Civil War. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven Southern states seceded from the United States (four more states soon followed). ... Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (BO-rih-gahrd) (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893), best known as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, was also a writer, civil servant, and inventor. ... First Battle of Fort Fisher Conflict American Civil War Date December 7-27, 1864 Place New Hanover County, North Carolina Result Confederate victory The First Battle of Fort Fisher was a failed attempt by Union forces to capture the fort guarding Wilmington, North Carolina, the Souths last major port... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Post war years

Benjamin Franklin Butler
Benjamin Franklin Butler

Butler was a Republican Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1867 to 1875 and again in 1877 to 1879. Despite his pre-war allegiance as a Democrat, in Congress he was conspicuous as a Radical Republican in Reconstruction legislation, and wrote the 1871 Ku Klux Klan Act. Along with Republican Senator Charles Sumner, he proposed the Civil Rights Act of 1875, a seminal and far-reaching law banning racial discrimination in public accommodations. The law was declared unconstitutional, and racial minorities in the United States would have to wait nearly a century before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 would revive, and expand, the provisions of the law Butler backed. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (660x931, 100 KB)Benjamin Franklin Butler (politician) - Project Gutenberg eText 13761 - http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (660x931, 100 KB)Benjamin Franklin Butler (politician) - Project Gutenberg eText 13761 - http://www. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... The Radical Republicans were an influential faction of American politicians in the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras, 1860-1876. ... // Reconstruction was the process in US history, 1863–1877, that resolved the issues of the American Civil War when both the Confederacy and its system of slavery were destroyed. ... The Civil Rights Act of 1871, now codified and known as , is one of the most important federal statutes in force in the United States. ... Charles Sumner (January 6, 1811 – March 11, 1874) was an American politician and statesman from Massachusetts. ... The Civil Rights Act of 1875 (18 Stat. ... President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964 . ...


Butler was one of the managers selected by the House to conduct the unsuccessful trial of impeachment, before the Senate, of President Johnson, opening the case and taking the most prominent part in it. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is the lower of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presiding. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the seventeenth President of the United States (1865–1869), succeeding to the presidency upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ...


He exercised a marked influence over President Grant and was regarded as his spokesman in the House. He was one of the foremost advocates of the payment in greenbacks of the government bonds. During his time in the House, he served as chairman of the Committee on Revision of the Laws in the 42nd Congress and the Committee on the Judiciary in the 43rd Congress. Ulysses S. Grant[1] (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and politician who was elected as the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ... A government bond is a bond issued by a national government denominated in the countrys own currency. ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


In 1872, Butler was among the several high-profile investors who were deceived by Philip Arnold in a famous diamond and gemstone hoax. Philip Arnold (1829 - 1878) was a con man from Elizabethtown, Kentucky, who was the brains behind a legendary 1872 scam to fool people into investing in western diamond mining operations. ...


Butler ran unsuccessfully for governor of Massachusetts as an independent in 1878, and also, in 1879, when he ran on the Democratic and Greenback tickets, but, in 1882, he was elected by the Democrats, who won no other state offices. From 1883 to 1884, he was Governor of Massachusetts. As presidential nominee of the Greenback and Anti-Monopoly parties, he polled 175,370 votes in the presidential election of 1884. He had bitterly opposed the nomination by the Democratic party of Grover Cleveland and tried to defeat him by throwing his own votes in Massachusetts and New York to the Republican candidate. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Greenback Party (Greenback-Labor Party) was an American political party that was active between 1874 and 1884. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... The Greenback Party (Greenback-Labor Party) was an American political party that was active between 1874 and 1884. ... The Anti-Monopoly Party was a short-lived U.S. political party that was founded in 1884 at its convention in Chicago, which took place on May 14th of that year. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... NY redirects here. ...


Butler's professional income as a lawyer was estimated at $100,000 per year shortly before his death. He was an able but erratic administrator and soldier, and a brilliant lawyer. As a politician, he excited bitter opposition, and was charged, apparently with justice, with corruption and venality in conniving at, and sharing, the profits of illicit trade with the Confederates carried on by his brother at New Orleans and by his brother-in-law in the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, while General Butler was in command.


Butler died while attending court in Washington, D.C.. He is buried in his wife's family plot in Hildreth Cemetery, Lowell, Massachusetts. His descendants include the famous scientist Adelbert Ames, Jr. and George Plimpton. Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Federal District District of Columbia Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D) City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack Evans...   Settled: 1653 â€“ Incorporated: 1826 Zip Code(s): 01852 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Adelbert Ames Adelbert Ames, Jr. ... George Ames Plimpton (March 18, 1927 – September 25, 2003) was an American journalist, writer, editor, and actor. ...


References

Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
  • Butler, Benjamin F., The Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General B. F. Butler: Butlers Book (New York, 1893).
  • Catton, Bruce, The Coming Fury: The Centennial History of the Civil War, Volume 1, Doubleday, 1961, ISBN 0-641-68525-4.
  • Eicher, John H., & Eicher, David J., Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3.
  • Parton, James, Butler in New Orleans, 1863.
  • Summers, Mark Wahlgren, Rum, Romanism & Rebellion: The Making of a President, 1884, 2000.
  • Trefousse, Hans L., Ben Butler: The South Called Him Beast!, 1957.
  • Warner, Ezra J., Generals in Blue: Lives of the Union Commanders, Louisiana State University Press, 1964, ISBN 0-8071-0822-7.
  • Biography at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Bruce Catton (October 9, 1899 — August 28, 1978) was a journalist and a notable historian of the American Civil War. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

Preceded by
John B. Alley
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 5th congressional district

March 4, 1867March 3, 1871 (redistricting)
Succeeded by
Daniel F. Gooch
Preceded by
Nathaniel P. Banks
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 6th congressional district

March 4, 1871March 3, 1875
Succeeded by
George B. Loring
Preceded by
John K. Tarbox
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 7th congressional district

March 4, 1877March 3, 1879
Succeeded by
William A. Russell
Preceded by
John D. Long
Governor of Massachusetts
January 4, 1883 - January 3, 1884
Succeeded by
George D. Robinson
Preceded by
James Baird Weaver
Greenback Party presidential candidate
1884 (lost)
Succeeded by
(none)

 
 

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