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Encyclopedia > Beloit College

Beloit College

Motto Scientia Vera Cum Fide Pura (True Science with Pure Faith)
Established 1846
Type Private University
Endowment US$90 million
President John Burris
Faculty 94
Undergraduates 1,300
Location Beloit, WI, USA
Nickname Buccaneers
Mascot Buccaneers (Official) Turtles (Academic-Unofficial)
Website www.beloit.edu

Beloit College is a liberal arts college in Beloit, Wisconsin and a member of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest. Its current president is John Burris, and its enrollment stands at roughly 1,300 undergraduate students. The campus is notable for numerous prehistoric Indian mounds. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Nickname: Location of Beloit in Wisconsin Coordinates: , Country United States State Wisconsin County Rock Founded 1836 Incorporated February 24, 1846 (village) March 31, 1856 (city) Government  - Manager Larry Arft  - City Attorney Tom Casper  - City Council Martin Densch (President) Kevin Leavy (V. President) Terrence T. Monahan Joel Patch Douglas Eddy Chad... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Nickname: Location of Beloit in Wisconsin Coordinates: , Country United States State Wisconsin County Rock Founded 1836 Incorporated February 24, 1846 (village) March 31, 1856 (city) Government  - Manager Larry Arft  - City Attorney Tom Casper  - City Council Martin Densch (President) Kevin Leavy (V. President) Terrence T. Monahan Joel Patch Douglas Eddy Chad... The Associated Colleges of the Midwest, ACM, is a consortium of fourteen leading liberal arts colleges located in Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... A tumulus (plural tumuli, from the Latin word for mound or small hill, from the root to bulge, swell also found in ) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. ...

Contents

Founding

Beloit College quad, showing Indian mounds and Middle College administration building
Beloit College quad, showing Indian mounds and Middle College administration building

Beloit College, the first post secondary education institution in Wisconsin, was founded by a group called Friends for Education, which was started by seven pioneers from New England who agreed that a college needed to be established soon after arrival in Wisconsin Territory. The group raised funds for a college to be founded in their new town and convinced the territorial legislature to enact their charter for Beloit College into law on February 2, 1846. The first building for the college (called Middle College) was built in 1847, and it remains in operation today. Classes began in the fall of 1847, and the college's first degrees were awarded in 1851. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Wisconsin Territory became an organized territory of the United States by an act of U.S. Congress passed on April 20, 1836 which went into effect on July 3, 1836. ... A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


History

The first president of Beloit was a Yale University graduate named Aaron Lucius Chapin, who served as president from December of 1849 until 1886, and under whose direction the college became widely known for scholastic achievement and for its willingness to experiment with new curricular approaches. The college remained very small for almost its entire first century with the enrollment only topping 1,000 students with the influx of World War II veterans in 1945-1946. The "Beloit Plan", an innovative year-round curriculum introduced in 1964, comprised of three full terms and a "field term" of off-campus study, brought the college increased national attention. The trustees decided to return to the two semester program in 1978. “Yale” redirects here. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


Among Beloit's more notable alumni are Roy Chapman Andrews, Robert Lee Morris, Jim Zwerg, and Lorine Niedecker. Teresa Heinz Kerry holds an honorary doctorate from Beloit College. Roy Chapman Andrews (January 26, 1884–March 11, 1960) was an American explorer, adventurer and naturalist who became the director of the American Museum of Natural History, primarily known for leading a series of expeditions through the fragmented China of the early 20th century into the Gobi Desert and Mongolia. ... Robert Lee Morris is a jewelry designer who attributes much of his inspiration to forms he admires in nature. ... Lorine Niedecker (May 12, 1903 - December 31, 1970) was born on the Black Hawk Island near Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. ... Maria Teresa Thierstein Simões-Ferreira Heinz Kerry (born October 5, 1938), is a philanthropist and the wife of U.S. Senator John Kerry. ... An Honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum) is a degree awarded to someone by an institution that he or she may have never attended, it may be a bachelors, masters or doctorate degree - however, the latter is most common. ...


One of the aforementioned Indian effigy mounds, in the shape of a turtle, inspired Beloit's symbol (and unofficial mascot). Diversity ca. ...


Although independent today, Beloit College was historically related to the Congregationalist tradition, continuing to maintain a limited relationship with the United Church of Christ. [1] However, that denomination has no congregations in Beloit proper. Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ...


Present day

Beloit College remains nationally known for its innovative curriculum, which retains many aspects of the "Beloit Plan" from the 1960s. Beloit has a good reputation in anthropology and geology, owing still to Roy Chapman Andrews' expeditions as well several pioneering geologists in the 19th century including T.C. Chamberlain and O.E. Mienzer. Beloit's students have placed well in the Association for Computing Machinery annual programming competition: 1990, Beloit placed 11th; 1991, 19th. They have often received "Meritorious" certificates for exceptional solutions in the Mathematical Modelling Competition. In the 2006 college rankings by U.S. News & World Report, Beloit was shortlisted for "Study Abroad" (56% of students do) and "First-Year Initiative". It was also ranked highly for percentage of students living on-campus. In 2007, it was listed 35th for "Best Value", and overall, it ranked 61st among liberal arts colleges. In 2000, Beloit was included in the book Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools You Should Know About Even if You’re Not a Straight-A Student (ISBN 0-14-029616-6). The 1999 National Study of Student Engagement ranked Beloit in the top 20% of five benchmark categories measuring the quality of the student experience, one of just four schools to achieve this ranking. The Association for Computing Machinery, or ACM, was founded in 1947 as the worlds first scientific and educational computing society. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ...

Middle College

The college long hosted the Beloit Poetry Journal, but the editor, Professor Emerita Marion K. Stocking, has retired to Maine and now runs the journal there. In 1985 the complementary Beloit Fiction Journal began, and has published an annual collection of short contemporary fiction every year since. The establishment of the Mackey Chair in Creative Writing has brought a new nationally-known author to campus annually for several years, including Billy Collins, Bei Dao, Ursula K. Le Guin, Amy Hempel, Denise Levertov, and Robert Stone. Beloit biology faculty member John Jungck along with Nils S. Peterson, CEO of From the Heart Software, co-founded and run the BioQUEST, while Brock Spencer maintains ChemLinks. Both are special-interest groups on the reform of science education. Beloit has had a faculty and student exchange program with Fudan University in China since the 1980s. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1728 × 2304 pixel, file size: 524 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Middle College-Photo By Alex Catalan I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1728 × 2304 pixel, file size: 524 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Middle College-Photo By Alex Catalan I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... William J. (Billy) Collins (born March 22, 1941) is a poet who served two terms as the 11th Poet Laureate of the United States, from 2001 to 2003. ... Bei Dao (Northern Island) is another name for Zhifu Island. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Amy Hempel (born December 14, 1951 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is a short story writer, journalist and university professor at Bennington College living in New York. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Photo of Robert Stone by Robert Birnbaum Robert Stone (born August 21, 1937) is a critically well regarded American novelist, whose work is typically characterized by psychological complexity, political concerns, and dark humor. ... Fudan University (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), located in Shanghai, China, is one of the oldest leading and most selective universities in the Peoples Republic of China. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Psychology Department is one of the most popular majors at Beloit. The Psychology Department started with the famous professor Guy Allen Tawney, who taught from 1897 to 1906. He was a student of Wilhelm Wundt who is one of the founders of psychology. Psychology majors may seek opportunities to help professors with their research. Additionally, many psycology majors conduct independent research or get involved with experience within the field. A study abroad program to Morocco and Estonia is targeted at psychology majors (although most students may apply for the program), where they engage in cross-cultural studies. Furthermore, many psychology students continue on to graduate programs for their M.A. or Ph.D.


The Beloit College Geology Department continues a tradition of excellence in geology that began with T.C. Chamberlin more than a century ago. Today the department combines a rigorous course load with mandatory field methods and mandatory field research. The department is currently a member of the Keck Geology Consortium. Started by the Keck Family, the philanthropic family most noted for forming the popular children's' show Sesame Street, the Keck Consortium is a research collaboration of several similar colleges across the United States, including Amherst College, Pomona College, and Washington and Lee University to name a few. The Consortium sends undergraduate students worldwide to research and publish their findings.


Two museums open to the public are on Beloit's campus and are run by College staff and students. The Logan Museum of Anthropology and the Wright Museum of Art both contain collections dating back to the late 19th century. The Logan Museum has an extensive array of ceramics and textiles and the Wright's holdings include a large collection of original prints. Both museums feature year round temporary special exhibitions. Beloit College's campus also houses two sculpture works by renowned international public artist Siah Armajani, these are his "Gazebo for One Anarchist: Emma Goldman 1991" and "The Beloit College Poetry Garden."[2]


Extra-curricular activities at Beloit play an important role, with intramural Ultimate having a high level of participation among students. Recently, Beloit College students broke the world record for the longest game of Ultimate by playing for over 72 hours [3]. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Beloit College also has a frisbee golf course contained almost entirely within the grounds of the college. Many students find this a relaxing way to spend time, during all hours of the day or night, regardless of pedestrians or inebriation. This course has undergone many changes with the expansion of dormitories and additions to the lovely grounds like the Poetry Garden [4]. Beloit students are ever flexible and have incorporated the garden into the course. There remains some debate as to whether the garden holes are too easy and merely a means of shooting an easy game below par.


Since 1998, the college has become known for the annual "Mindset Lists," written by Professor Tom McBride, summarizing pop culture references which are allegedly meaningless to incoming college freshmen or to their parents. In 2004, the college unveiled a renovation plan that would tie the campus more effectively to the community. In 2006, Beloit officially announced that it was attempting to raise $100 million. This campaign would fund a new science building, an increased endowment, and other campus improvements.


Justice Richard Goldstone was named the 2007 Weissberg Distinguished Professor of International Studies at Beloit College, in Beloit, Wisconsin. From January 17–28, 2007 he visited classes, worked with faculty and students, participated in panel discussions on human rights and transitional justice with leading figures in the field and delivered the annual Weissberg Lecture, "South Africa's Transition to Democracy: The Role of the Constitutional Court" on January 24th at the Moore Lounge in Pearsons Hall. Richard J. Goldstone, (born October 26, 1938), South African judge and international war crimes prosecutor. ...

Justice Richard J. Goldstone delivers the 2007 Weissberg Lecture

On March 23, 2007 Congressman John Lewis delivered the keynote speech "Get In The Way" for the College's New Conscience/New Campus/New Community Conference. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 1584 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 1584 pixel, file size: 2. ...


Prominent departments

Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the comparative study of the physical and social characteristics of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, and cultural relationships. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is an academic / applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior of humans and animals. ... Chemistry - the study of atoms, made of nuclei (conglomeration of center particles) and electrons (outer particles), and the structures they form. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Dance (from French danser, perhaps from Frankish) generally refers to movement used as a form of expression, social interaction or presented in a spiritual or performance setting. ...

Athletics

Womens Vollyball-2007 MWC Champions
Womens Vollyball-2007 MWC Champions

Beloit College is a member of the Midwest Conference, NCAA in Div. III and fields varsity teams in football, baseball, softball, volleyball, men's and women's swimming, men's and women's basketball, men's and women's golf, men's and women's cross country, men's and women's tennis, men's and women's track & field, men's and women's soccer. Beloit College also has a competitive rowing team that is sponsored by club funds and alumni support. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 1584 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixel Image in higher resolution (2816 × 1584 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (or GLIAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division II. The GLIAC was founded in June 1972. ...


Prominent alumni

Roy Chapman Andrews (January 26, 1884–March 11, 1960) was an American explorer, adventurer and naturalist who became the director of the American Museum of Natural History, primarily known for leading a series of expeditions through the fragmented China of the early 20th century into the Gobi Desert and Mongolia. ... James Arness James Arness (originally Aurness) (born May 26, 1923 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an actor best known for portraying Marshal Matt Dillon on Gunsmoke for 20 years, a record length for a character on a single prime time show (though the length of time in a role is shared... Don Bolles (July 28, 1928 - June 2, 1976) was a reporter for the Arizona Republic newspaper. ... Troop 1500 is a documentary film about a unique Girl Scouts of the USA troop which unites mothers and daughters monthly behind the bars at the Hilltop Prison in Gatesville, Texas. ... Thomas Chrowder Chamberlin (1843 - 1928) was an influential American geologist and educator. ... Evan Montvel Cohen (born 1966) was a co-founder and the first chairman of Air America Radio. ... Air America Radio is a talk radio network and program syndication service in the United States. ... Jay Norwood Ding Darling (1887-1962) was an American cartoonist and conservationist. ... Adolph Dubs ( August 4, 1920 - February 14, 1979) was the U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan from 1978 to 1979. ... Thomas Hulce (born December 6, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated, Tony Award and Emmy Award-winning American actor. ... Maria Teresa Thierstein Simões-Ferreira Heinz Kerry (born October 5, 1938), is a philanthropist and the wife of U.S. Senator John Kerry. ... Pat Kilbane Pat Kilbane (rn November 5, 1969) is a very tall comic actor. ... Koss can refer to: Koss Corporation, a United States company that designs and manufactures headphones Johann Olav Koss, the Norwegian Olympic speed-skater and official Koss (album), an album by Paul Kossoff This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Christina Elizabeth Kramer is Professor of Slavic and Balkan languages and linguistics at the University of Toronto and Chair of the universitys Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures which is part of the Faculty of Arts and Science. ... Kerwin Mathews (born January 8, 1926) is a former American actor. ... Warren Miller was born in Hollywood, California in 1924. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... Robert Lee Morris is a jewelry designer who attributes much of his inspiration to forms he admires in nature. ... Lorine Niedecker (May 12, 1903 - December 31, 1970) was born on the Black Hawk Island near Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. ... Margaret Farmer Margie Planton (born 13 February 1949, in Fairbanks, Alaska) is an American politician of the Democratic party who served as mayor of Chillicothe, Ohio, and as a member of the Chillicothe city council in the 1990s and early 2000s. ... Francis Jameson Parker Jr. ... Walter Robinson Parr was a preacher at St. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... John Thorn (born April 17, 1947) is a noted sports historian. ... Prior to his appointment as U.S. Ambassador to Hungary, Peter Tufo was with the law firm of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy in New York City, specializing in mergers and acquisitions and corporate finance. ... Willard A. Wirtz (Willard A. Wirtz) (born 1912) was a U.S. administrator. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... Amy Wright (born April 15, 1950 in Beloit, Wisconsin) is an American actress. ... Dr. James Woodward Strong, theologian and scholar, was the first president of Carleton College. ... Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ...

External links

More information can be obtained in the book entitled "Colleges That Change Lives"


  Results from FactBites:
 
Beloit College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (906 words)
Beloit College is a liberal arts college in Beloit, Wisconsin and a member of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest.
Beloit College, the first post secondary education institution in Wisconsin, was founded by a group called Friends for Education, which was started by seven pioneers from New England who agreed that a college needed to be established soon after arrival in Wisconsin Territory.
Beloit College is a member of the Midwest Conference, NCAA in Div.
Beloit College - definition of Beloit College in Encyclopedia (346 words)
Beloit College was founded by a group called Friends for Education, which was founded by seven pioneers from New England who agreed that a college needed to be established soon after arrival in Wisconsin Territory.
The first president of Beloit was a Yale graduate named Aaron Lucius Chapin, who served as president from December of 1849 until 1886, under whose direction the college became widely known for scholastic achievement, and for its willingness to experiment with new curricular approaches.
In 1964, the college unveiled the "Beloit Plan", an entirely new approach to the school year which emphasized year-round education -- this brought increased national attention to the college.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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