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Encyclopedia > Bell (instrument)

A bell is a simple sound-making device. The bell is a percussion instrument and an idiophone. Its form is usually an open-ended hollow drum which resonates upon being struck. The striking implement can be a tongue suspended within the bell, known as a clapper, a small, free sphere enclosed within the body of the bell, or a separate mallet. Sound is a disturbance of mechanical energy that propagates through matter as a longitudinal wave. ... A percussion instrument can be any object which produces a sound by being struck with an implement, shaken, rubbed, scraped, or by any other action which sets the object into vibration. ... An idiophone is any musical instrument which creates sound primarily by way of the instrument itself vibrating, without the use of strings or membranes. ...


Bells are usually made of cast metal, but small bells can also be made from ceramic or glass. Bells can be of all sizes: from tiny dress accessories to church bells weighing tons. Fixed Partial Denture, or Bridge The word ceramic is derived from the Greek word κεραμικός (keramikos). ... Glass can be made transparent and flat, or into other shapes and colors as shown in this sphere from the Verrerie of Brehat in Brittany. ...

The bells of St Sava's.

Contents

Temple of Saint Savas bells. ... Temple of Saint Savas bells. ... The (Orthodox) Temple of Saint Sava (Serbian: Храм Светог Саве) in Belgrade, Serbia is the largest Orthodox Church Temple currently in use. ...

Church and temple bells

Church with Belltower
Church with Belltower

In the Western world, its most classical form is a church bell or town bell, which is hung within a tower and sounded by having the entire bell swung by ropes, whereupon an internal hinged clapper strikes the body of the bell (called a free-swinging bell). A set of bells, hung in a circle for change ringing, is known as a ring of bells. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The term Western World or the West (also on rare occasions called the Occident) can have multiple meanings depending on its context (i. ... Church bell from Saleby, Västergötland, Sweden containing an inscription from 1228 in the Runic alphabet A church bell is a bell which is rung in a (especially Christian) church either to signify the hour or the time for worshippers to go to church, perhaps to attend a wedding... Change ringing is the art of ringing a set of tuned bells in a series of mathematical patterns called changes, without attempting to ring a conventional tune. ... A ring of bells (or peal of bells) is a complete set of bells, hung in a circle – usually in a tower – for change ringing. ...


In the Eastern world, the traditional forms of bells are temple and palace bells, small ones being rung by a sharp rap with a stick, and very large ones rung by a blow from the outside by a large swinging beam. This last technique is employed world-wide for some of the largest tower-borne bells, because swinging the bell itself could damage the tower. The term Eastern world refers very broadly to the various cultures, social structures and philosophical systems of the East, namely Asia (including China, India, Japan, and surrounding regions). ...


In the Roman Catholic Church and among some High Anglicans, small hand-held bells, called Sanctus or sacring bells, are often rung by a server at Mass when the priest holds high up first the host, and then the chalice immediately after he has said the words of consecration over them (the moment known as the Elevation). This serves to indicate to the congregation that the bread and wine have just been transformed into the body and blood of Christ (see transubstantiation), or, in the alternative Anglican teaching, that Christ is now really present in the elements, and that what the priest is holding up for them to look at is Christ himself. The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Sanctus is the Latin word for holy, and is the name of an important hymn of Christian liturgy. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... Transubstantiation (in Latin, transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into that of the body and blood of Christ that, according to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church, occurs in the Eucharist and that is called in Greek (see Metousiosis). ...


Japanese religious bells

Japanese Shintoist and Buddhist bells are used in religious ceremonies. Suzu, a homophone meaning both "cool and refreshing," are spherical bells which contain metal pellets that produce sound from the inside. The hemispherical bell is the Kane bell, which is struck on the outside. See also Kane (musical instrument), ja:鈴, ja:梵鐘. Shinto ) is the native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Suzu (珠洲市; -shi) is a city located in Ishikawa, Japan. ... Kane can refer to: In wrestling: Glen Jacobs, the current World Wrestling Entertainment wrestler Kane. ... A Kane is a type of bell from Japan. ...


Buddhist bells

Buddhist bells are used in religious ceremonies. See also Tibetan tingsha bells. A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Bells as musical instruments

Some bells are used as musical instruments, such as carillons, (clock) chimes, or ensembles of bell-players, called bell choirs, using hand-held bells of varying tones. A "ring of bells" is a set of 4 to twelve bells or more used in change ringing, a particular method of ringing bells in patterns. A peal in changing ringing may have bells playing for several hours, playing 5,000 or more patterns without a break or repetition. A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... The Netherlands Carillon in Arlington, Virginia, USA. A carillon is a musical instrument composed of at least 23 cup-shaped bells played from a baton keyboard using fists and feet (such an instrument with fewer than this number of bells is known as a chime). ... A carillon-like instrument with less than 23 bells is called a chime. ... User:A bell choir is a choir made up of bells or bell ringers which sing the songs in lieu of a chorus of people. ... Change ringing is the art of ringing a set of tuned bells in a series of mathematical patterns called changes, without attempting to ring a conventional tune. ... A ring of bells (or peal of bells) is a complete set of bells, hung in a circle – usually in a tower – for change ringing. ...


Ancient Chinese bells

The ancient Chinese had bronze bells called zhong (鐘) which were used as musical instruments. Some of these bells were dated from 2000 to 3600 years old. These bells can each produce two tones. These bells usually have inscriptions on them from which scholars used as references for studying ancient Chinese writings (also known as Bronzeware script). Another related ancient Chinese musical instrument is called qing (磬 pinyin qing4) but it was made of stone instead of metal. Bronzeware script (金文 pinyin jin wen or 鐘鼎文 pinyin zhong1 ding3 wen2) is a family of scripts found on Chinese bronzes such as zhong (bells) and ding (tripods), since bronze artifacts with Chinese characters span many centuries and they have been found in many areas of China. ... It has been suggested that Pinyin method be merged into this article or section. ...


Bellmaking

The ringing of bells is known as bellringing, and such a bell produces a very loud, clear tone. If the bell is mounted as cast, it is called a "maiden bell" while "tuned bells" are worked after casting to produce a precise note. The traditional metal for these bells is a bronze of about 20% tin. Known as bell metal, this alloy is also the traditional alloy for the finest Turkish and Chinese cymbals. Other materials sometimes used for large bells include brass and iron. The process of casting bells is called bellmaking or bellfounding. Campanology is the study of bells — the methods of casting and tuning them and the art or science of ringing them. ... Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... General Name, Symbol, Number tin, Sn, 50 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 5, p Appearance silvery lustrous gray Atomic mass 118. ... Bell metal is a hard alloy used for making bells. ... Cymbals are made from four main alloys, all of them copper-based. ... Sabian Paragon cymbals 10-Inch (25 cm) AA Splash Cymbals (Fr. ... Brass is any alloy of copper and zinc; the proportions of zinc and copper can be varied to create a range of brasses, each of which has unique properties[1]. Note that in comparison bronze is principally an alloy of copper and tin. ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Atomic mass 55. ... Bellmaking or bellfounding is the craft of creating bells in a foundry. ...


Bell towers

Bells are also associated with clocks, indicating the hour by ringing. Indeed, the word clock comes from the Latin word cloca, meaning bell. Clock towers or bell towers can be heard over long distances which was especially important in the time when clocks were too expensive for widespread use. A clock (from the Latin cloca, bell) is an instrument for measuring time. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A tower containing one or more bells, typically part of a church, is a bell tower; attached to a city hall or other civil building, it is usually named belfry; the occasional free standing one may be referred to by its Italian name, campanile. ...


In the case of clock towers and grandfather clocks, a particular sequence of tones may be played to represent the hour. One common pattern is called the "Westminster Quarters," a sixteen-note pattern named after the Palace of Westminster which popularized it as the measure used by Big Ben. The Westminster Quarters is the most common name for a melody used by a set of clock bells to strike the hour. ... The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, in London, England is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) meet to conduct their business. ... The Clock Tower, colloquially known as Big Ben (a name that correctly refers to only the main bell) Big Ben redirects here. ...


Famous bells

  • The Great Bell of Dhammazedi may have been the largest bell ever made. It was lost in a river in Myanmar after being removed from a temple by the Portuguese in 1608. It is reported to have been about 300 tonnes in weight.
  • The Tsar Kolokol bell by the Motorin Bellfounders is the largest bell still in existence. It weighs 160 tonnes, but it was never rung and broke in 1737. It is on display in Moscow, Russia inside the Kremlin.
  • The Great Mingun Bell is the largest functioning bell. It is located in Mingun, Myanmar and weighs 90 tonnes (200,000 lb).
  • The World Peace Bell is the largest functioning swinging bell. It is located in Newport, Kentucky, United States, cast by Paccard of France. The bell itself weighs 66,000 lb while with clapper and supports the total weight which swings when the bell is tolled is 89,390 lb.
  • The Bell of King Seongdeok is the largest extant bell in Korea. The full Korean name means "Sacred Bell of King Seongdeok the Great." It was also known as the Bell of Bongdeoksa Temple, where it was first housed. The bell weighs about 25 tons and was originally cast in 771 CE. It is now stored in the National Museum of Gyeongju.
  • Pummerin in Vienna's Stephansdom is the most famous bell in Austria and the fifth largest in the world.
  • The St. Petersglocke, in the local dialect of Cologne also called "Decke Pitter" (fat Peter), is a bell in Germany's Cologne Cathedral. It weighs 24 tons and was cast in 1922. It is the largest functioning free-swinging bell in the world that swings around the top. (The World Peace Bell swings around the center of gravity, which is more like turning than swinging. So, depending on the point of view, the St. Petersglocke may be up to now the largest free-swinging bell in the world.)
  • Maria Dolens, the bell for the Fallen in Rovereto (TN - Italy) weighs 22.6 tons.
  • Big Ben is the hour bell of the Great Clock in St. Stephen's Tower at the Palace of Westminster, the home of the Houses of Parliament in the United Kingdom.
  • The South West tower of St Paul's Cathedral in London, England, houses Great Paul, the largest bell in the British Isles. It weighs 16½ tons and is larger than Big Ben. One can hear Great Paul booming out over Ludgate Hill at 1300 every day.
  • Great Tom is the bell that hangs in Tom Tower (designed by Christopher Wren) of Christ Church, Oxford. It was cast in 1680, and weighs over six tons. Great Tom is still rung 101 times at 21:05 every night to signify the 101 original scholars of the college.
  • The Liberty Bell is an American bell of great historic significance, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It previously hung in Independence Hall and was rung on July 4, 1776 to mark American independence.
  • Little John, named after the character from the legends of Robin Hood is the bell within the Clock Tower of Nottingham Council House. It is the deepest bell in the United Kingdom and its chimes are said to be heard over the greatest distance of any in the UK. [citation needed]
  • Sigismund is a bell in the Wawel Cathedral in Kraków, Poland, cast in 1520. It is rung only on very significant national occasions, the most recent of which was the death of Pope John Paul II.
  • The Maria Gloriosa in Erfurt, cast by Gerhard van Wou, is considered to be one of Germany's, and als Europa's, most beautiful medieval bells, serving as a model for many other bells.[citation needed]

Events March 18 - Sissinios formally crowned Emperor of Ethiopia May 14 - Protestant Union founded in Auhausen. ... A tonne or metric ton (symbol t), sometimes referred to as a metric tonne, is a measurement of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms. ... Tsar Kolokol (Tsar Bell) (Царь-колокол in Russian) - a huge bell still on display in the Kremlin. ... The Motorins, also spelled Matorins (Моторины, Маторины in Russian) were a famous Russian family of bell casters. ... A tonne or metric ton (symbol t), sometimes referred to as a metric tonne, is a measurement of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms. ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... Location Position of Moscow in Europe Government Country District Subdivision Russia Central Federal District Federal City Mayor Yuriy Luzhkov Geographical characteristics Area  - City 1,081 km² Population  - City (2007)    - Density 10,469,000   9684. ... The Moscow Kremlin (Russian: Московский Кремль) is a historic fortified complex at the very heart of Moscow, overlooking the Moskva River (to the south), Red Square (to the east) and the Alexander Garden (to the west). ... Nun on alms round, Mingun Paya, Myanmar Courtesy: http://www. ... The World Peace Bell is located in Newport, Kentucky, and with a weight of 66,000 lbs and width of 12 feet, is the largest swinging bell in the world. ... The Campbell County Courthouse in Newport, Kentucky Newport is a city in Campbell County, Kentucky, USA, at the confluence of the Ohio and Licking Rivers. ... The Bell of King Seongdeok is the largest extant bell in Korea and one of the largest in the world. ... Korea (Korean: 한국 or ì¡°ì„ , see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. ... Pummerin (Boomer) is the name of the two largest bells in the history of the Stephansdom in Vienna. ... Vienna (German: , see also other names) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... // The Stephansdom (Cathedral of Saint Stephen), in Vienna, Austria, is the seat of a Roman Catholic Archbishop, a beloved symbol of Vienna, and the site of many important events in Austrias national life. ... Kölsch is a very closely related small set of dialects, or variants, of the Ripuarian Middle German group of languages. ... For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... The Cologne Cathedral (German: Kölner Dom, official name ) is one of the best-known architectural monuments in Germany and has been Colognes most famous landmark since its completion in the late 19th century. ... The World Peace Bell is located in Newport, Kentucky, and with a weight of 66,000 lbs and width of 12 feet, is the largest swinging bell in the world. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Rovereto - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Trento (Italian: Provincia autonoma di Trento, German: Autonome Provinz Trient) is an autonomous province in the autonomous Trentino-South Tyrol region of Italy. ... The Clock Tower, colloquially known as Big Ben (a name that correctly refers to only the main bell) Big Ben redirects here. ... The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, in London, England is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) meet to conduct their business. ... The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Great Tom is the bell that hangs in Tom Tower (designed by Christopher Wren) in Christ Church, University of Oxford, England. ... Tom Tower seen from the quad Tom Tower seen from St Aldates Tom Tower is a bell tower in Oxford, England. ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ... Christ Church is the name of various churches and cathedrals, usually Protestant, named after Jesus Christ himself. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... The Liberty Bell The Liberty Bell, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is an American bell of great historic significance. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Official language(s) English, Pennsylvania Dutch Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Independence Hall, officially known as the Pennsylvania State House, is a U.S. national landmark located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Council House from Old Market Square, Nottingham. ... Robin Hood memorial statue in Nottingham. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... Sigismund (Polish: Zygmunt), named after his founder, King Sigismund the Old, is a bell cast in 1520 by Hans Beham in Kraków, Poland. ... Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral – in full, the Cathedral Basilica of St Stanislaus and St Wenceslaus – is Polands national sanctuary. ... Wawel Hill. ... mary elline m. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), (Italian: Giovanni Paolo II), born   [] (May 18, 1920, Wadowice, Poland – April 2, 2005, Vatican City) reigned as Pope of the Roman... Mariendom and the Severikirche. ...

Chimes

A variant on the bell is the tubular bell. Several of these metal tubes which are struck manually with hammers, form an instrument named tubular bells or chimes. In the case of wind or aeolian chimes, the tubes are blown against one another by the wind. Tubular bells (also known as chimes) are musical instruments in the percussion family. ...


See also

Campanology is the study of bells and the methods of casting, tuning and sounding them, of the creation and perfection of musical instruments consisting of one or more racks of bells and the composing for and playing on these. ... The cowbell is a percussion instrument. ... Ships bells are a system to indicate the hour by means of bells, used aboard a ship to regulate the sailors duty watches. ... Royal Eijsbouts is the largest bell foundry in the world. ... John Taylor Bellfounders is, as of 2004, the worlds largest bell foundry, based in Loughborough, England. ... The Whitechapel Bell Foundry is a bell foundry based in the Whitechapel district of east London. ... St. ... A bellhop (also bellboy or bellman) is the term for a hotel employee who helps patrons with their luggage while checking in or out. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bell (musical instrument) - MSN Encarta (843 words)
The clapper may be fastened to the inside of the bell, or it may be a separate hand-held or mechanically or electrically moved hammer that strikes the outside rim (as in an electronically operated doorbell).
Bells are classified as idiophones (instruments in which resonant solid material vibrates to produce sound); they vibrate primarily near the rim.
The casting of bells declined in late antiquity, and handbells of the cowbell type came into use; these were made of thin metal plates bent into rectangles and fastened with rivets.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Bell (instrument) (4054 words)
The bell is a percussion instrument and an idiophone.
In the Eastern world, the traditional forms of bells are temple and palace bells, small ones being rung by a sharp rap with a stick, and very large ones rung by a blow from the outside by a large swinging beam.
Sigismund is a bell in the Wawel Cathedral in Kraków, Poland, cast in 1520.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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