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Encyclopedia > Belarusians
Belarusians
Total population

9-10 million Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Pavel Osipovich Sukhoi Pavel Osipovich Sukhoi (Павел Осипович Сухой) (July 22, 1895 – September 15, 1975) was a Belarusian aircraft constructor and designer. ... Alexander Aleksandrovich Bogdanov Russian: (born Alyaksandr Malinouski, Belarusian: ) August 22 (Old Style), 1873, Hrodna, Russia (today Belarus) - April 7, 1928, Moscow) was a Russian physician, philosopher, economist, science fiction writer, and revolutionary of Belarusian ethnicity whose scientific interests ranged from the universal systems theory to the possibility of human rejuvenation... FranciÅ¡ak Skaryna (or Skoryna; the first name also spelled as Francis, Franciszak, Frantsiszak, Francisk, Frantzisk, Francysk; Belarusian: ) was a Belarusian famous for being the printer of the first book in an Eastern Slavic language. ... Kazimir Severinovich Malevich (Russian: , Polish: , Ukrainian Казимір Северинович Малевич, German: ), (February 23, 1878 – May 15, 1935) was a painter and art theoretician, pioneer of geometric abstract art and one of the most important members of the Russian avant-garde. ... Euphrosyne (sometimes spelled Efrasinnia) of Polatsk (or Polacak, Polotsk) (Belarusian: Эўфрасі́ньня По́лацкая) was the granddaughter of a prince of Polacak, Usiaslau. ... Maksim Bahdanovič Maksim Bahdanovič (Belarusian language: Максім Багдановіч December 9, 1891 – May 25, 1917) was a famous Belarusian poet, journalist and literature critiscist. ...

Regions with significant populations
Flag of Belarus Belarus: 8,159,073[1]
Flag of Russia Russia 807,970 [2]
Flag of Ukraine Ukraine 275,800[3]
Flag of Kazakhstan Kazakhstan 111,926[4]
Flag of Latvia Latvia 93,583[5]
Flag of Canada Canada 50,000 - 70,000 [6]
Flag of Brazil Brazil 45,000 - 80,000 [7]
Flag of Poland Poland 48,700[8]
Flag of Lithuania Lithuania 42,866[9]
Flag of Estonia Estonia 17,241[10]
Languages
Belarusian, Russian
Religion
Predominantly Eastern Orthodox with a Roman Catholic minority. Many consider themselves Atheists.
Related ethnic groups
Other Slavic peoples, especially East Slavs (Russians, Ukrainians, Rusyns)

Belarusians or Belorussians (Belarusian: Беларусы, Biełarusy, previously also spelled Belarussians, Byelorussians and Belorusians, also White Russians) are an East Slavic ethnic group who populate the majority of the Republic of Belarus and form minorities in neighboring Poland (especially in the former Bialystok province), Russia, Lithuania and Ukraine. Noticeable numbers have immigrated to the United States, Brazil and Canada in the early 20th century. Since the breakup of the USSR several hundred thousand have immigrated to the European Union, United States, Canada and Russia. Introduced to the world as a new state in the early 1990s, the Republic of Belarus brought with it the notion of a re-emerging Belarusian ethnicity, drawn upon the lines of the Belarusian language. There are over 8 million people who associate themselves with the Belarusian ethnicity today. Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kazakhstan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Latvia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Atheist redirects here. ... Countries with dominating Slavic ethnicities  West Slavic  East Slavic  South Slavic Slav redirects here. ... The East Slavs are a Slavic ethnic group, the speakers of East Slavic languages. ... Rusyns, also called Ruthenians, Ruthenes, Rusins, Carpatho-Rusins, and Russniaks, are a modern group of ethnic groups that speak the Rusyn language and are descended from the minority of Ruthenians who did not adopt a Ukrainian national identity and become Ukrainians in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ... The East Slavs are a Slavic ethnic group, the speakers of East Slavic languages. ... Bialystok Voivodship (Polish: województwo biaÅ‚ostockie) - a unit of administrative division and local government in Poland in years 1975-1998, superseded by Podlasie Voivodship. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... Belarus (Belarusian: Белару́сь or Biełaruś, Russian: Белару́сь (formerly: Белору́ссия), Polish: Białoruś) is a landlocked nation of Eastern Europe with the capital Minsk. ... The Belarusian or Belorussian language (беларуская мова, BGN/PCGN: byelaruskaya mova, Scientific: bjelaruskaja mova) is the language of the Belarusian people and is spoken in Belarus and abroad, chiefly in Russia, Ukraine, Poland. ...


The native language of the territory of Belarus is Belarusian; however the majority of Belarusians in Belarus are able to speak Russian and often use it as their day-to-day language (especially in Minsk and other large cities). Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ...


The prefix Bela- translates into "White" so these people were sometimes called White Russians (though not to be confused with the political group of White Russians that opposed the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War). This name was in use in the West for some time in history, together with White Ruthenes, White Ruthenians and similar forms. Using the term "White Russians" is misleading as it incorrectly suggests being a subgroup of Russians and some Belarusians take offense for it being applied. Belarusians trace their name back to the people of Rus and not to Russians, who are also descendants of the people of Rus. The banner of White Ruthenia White Russia is a name that was historically applied to different regions in Eastern Europe, most often to the region that roughly corresponds to the present-day Belarus. ... White army may refer to: The military arm of the White movement, a loose coalition of anti-Bolshevik forces in the Russian Civil War The Saudi Arabian National Guard The National Guard of Kuwait This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... This article is about the Bolshevik faction in the RSDLP 1903-1912. ... Combatants Local Soviet powers led by Russian SFSR and Red Army Chinese mercenaries White Movement Central Powers (1917-1918): Austria-Hungary Ottoman Empire German Empire Allied Intervention: (1918-1922) Japan Czechoslovakia Greece  United States  Canada Serbia Romania UK  France Foreign volunteers: Polish Italian Local nationalist movements, national states, and decentralist... A compass rose with west highlighted This article refers to the cardinal direction; for other uses see West (disambiguation). ... Ruthenia is a name applied to parts of Eastern Europe which were populated by Eastern Slavic peoples, as well as to various states that existed in this territory in the past. ...

Commonwealth of Polish Kingdom and Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the 17th century      Kingdom of Poland      Duchy of Prussia, Polish fief      Grand Duchy of Lithuania      Duchy of Courland, a joint fief      Livonia
Commonwealth of Polish Kingdom and Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the 17th century      Kingdom of Poland      Duchy of Prussia, Polish fief      Grand Duchy of Lithuania      Duchy of Courland, a joint fief      Livonia

The Belarusian people trace their distinct culture to the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and earlier Kievan Rus and the Principality of Polatsk. Most Belarusians are descendants of the East Slav tribes Dregovichs, Krivichs and Radimichs. Early East Slavs also mixed with the local Balts, especially in the west and north-west of today's Belarus. In 13th-18th centuries Belarusians were mostly known under the name of Rusins (Ruthenians) or Litvins (Lithuanians), which refers to the state of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Litva, Vialikaja Litva) of which the White Ruthenian lands were part of since the 13th-14th centuries and where Ruthenian language was widely used. On the grounds of the dominance of Ruthenian language (which later evolved into modern Belarusian language) some Belarusian historians believe the Grand Duchy of Lithuania to have been their national state when it existed. Another name that was originally commonly used to describe those people was Ruthenians, by the name of the Ruthenian state which the White Russia area originally belonged to. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1973x1556, 717 KB) LEGEND: 1 - The Crown (Kingdom of Poland), 2 - Duch of Prussia - Polish fief, 3 - Grand Duchy of Lithuania, 4 - Duchy of Courland - Livonian fief, 5 - Livonia. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1973x1556, 717 KB) LEGEND: 1 - The Crown (Kingdom of Poland), 2 - Duch of Prussia - Polish fief, 3 - Grand Duchy of Lithuania, 4 - Duchy of Courland - Livonian fief, 5 - Livonia. ... The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Lithuanian: , Ruthenian: Wialikaje Kniastwa Litowskaje, Ruskaje, Å»amojckaje, Belarusian: , Ukrainian: , Polish: , Latin: ) was an Eastern and Central European state of the 12th[1] /13th century until the 18th century. ... Kievan Rus′ (Ки́евская Ру́сь, Kievskaya Rus in Russian; Київська Русь, Kyivs’ka Rus’ in Ukrainian) was the early, mostly East Slavic¹ state dominated by the city of Kiev (ru: Ки́ев, Kiev; uk: Ки́їв, Kyiv), from about 880 to the middle of the 12th century. ... Principality of Polatsk (Belarusian: Полацкае княства ,Russian: Полоцкое княжество ) is a medieval principality of the Early East Slavs, one of the constituent principalities within the Kievan Rus. ... The Dregovichs or (more correct) Dregovichi (Дреговичи, Dregovichi in Russian; Дреговичі, Drehovychi in Ukrainian) were a tribe of Early East Slavs, which inhabited the territories down the stream of the Pripyat River and northern parts of the Right-bank Dnieper river (the borders of the tribes domain are still not eastablished... Kriwi  album cover The Krivichs or (more correct) Krivichi (Кривичи́ in Russian, Крывічы́ in Belarusian ), one of the tribal unions of Early East Slavs between the 6th and the 12th centuries, which inhabited the upper reaches of the Volga, Dnieper, Western Dvina, the southern part of the Lake Peipus and parts of... The Radimichs (Радзiмiчы in Belarusian, Радимичи in Russian; Радимичі in Ukrainian), were a tribe of Early East Slavs of the last few centuries of the 1st millennium, which inhabited upper east parts of the Dnieper down the Sozh River and its tributaries. ... The East Slavs are the ethnic group that evolved into the Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian peoples. ... http://www. ... Ruthenians is a name that has been applied to different ethnic groups at different times; for an explanation of the reasons for this, see Ruthenia. ... The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Lithuanian: , Ruthenian: Wialikaje Kniastwa Litowskaje, Ruskaje, Å»amojckaje, Belarusian: , Ukrainian: , Polish: , Latin: ) was an Eastern and Central European state of the 12th[1] /13th century until the 18th century. ... Ruthenian was a historic East Slavic language, spoken in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and later in the East Slavic territories of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... The Belarusian or Belorussian language (беларуская мова, BGN/PCGN: byelaruskaya mova, Scientific: bjelaruskaja mova) is the language of the Belarusian people and is spoken in Belarus and abroad, chiefly in Russia, Ukraine, Poland. ... The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Lithuanian: , Ruthenian: Wialikaje Kniastwa Litowskaje, Ruskaje, Å»amojckaje, Belarusian: , Ukrainian: , Polish: , Latin: ) was an Eastern and Central European state of the 12th[1] /13th century until the 18th century. ... Ruthenians is a name that has been applied to different ethnic groups at different times; for an explanation of the reasons for this, see Ruthenia. ... Ruthenia is a name applied to parts of Eastern Europe which were populated by Eastern Slavic peoples, as well as to various states that existed in this territory in the past. ... The banner of White Ruthenia White Russia is a name that was historically applied to different regions in Eastern Europe, most often to the region that roughly corresponds to the present-day Belarus. ...


After World War I Belarusians had their own statehood, with varying degrees of independence - first as the short-lived Belarusian National Republic under German occupation, then as the Byelorussian SSR from 1919 until 1991, which merged with other republics to become a constituent member of the Soviet Union in 1922). Belarus gained full independence with the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Anthem Belarusian: Come, We Shall March in Joint Endeavour Capital Minsk Capital-in-exile Prague Language(s) Belarusian Government Republic Rada Chairman  - 1918 – 1919 Jan Sierada  - 1919 Piotra KrečeÅ­ski Chairperson-in-exile  - 1919 – 1928 Piotra KrečeÅ­ski  - since 1997 Ivonka Survilla Historical era World War I  - Independence... State motto: Belarusian: Пралетарыі ўсіх краін, яднайцеся! Translation: Workers of the world, unite! Capital Minsk Official language Belarusian, Russian Established In the USSR:  - Since  - Until January 1, 1919 December 30, 1922 August 25, 1991 Area  - Total  - Water (%) Ranked 6th in the USSR 207,600 km² negligible Population  - Total   - Density Ranked 5th in the USSR... This is a history of the Soviet Union from 1985 to 1991. ...


External links

  • Ethnographic Map (New York, 1953)
  • CIA World Fact Book 2005

References and notes

  1. ^ (1999 census)[1]
  2. ^ (2002 census) [2]
  3. ^ (2001 census)[3]
  4. ^ (1999 census)[4]
  5. ^ (2002 census)[5]
  6. ^ (est)[6]
  7. ^ (2002 census)[7]
  8. ^ (2002 census)[8]
  9. ^ (2001 census)[9]
  10. ^ (2000 census)[10]

See also

This is a list of people who are descended from the Old Belarusians of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. ... Population: 10,322,151 (July 2003 est. ... Litvins can mean: Belarusians or Lithuanians (usually in old contexts) Any persons from Grand Duchy of Lithuania This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Kriwi  album cover The Krivichs or (more correct) Krivichi (Кривичи́ in Russian, Крывічы́ in Belarusian ), one of the tribal unions of Early East Slavs between the 6th and the 12th centuries, which inhabited the upper reaches of the Volga, Dnieper, Western Dvina, the southern part of the Lake Peipus and parts of... The Dregovichs or (more correct) Dregovichi (Дреговичи, Dregovichi in Russian; Дреговичі, Drehovychi in Ukrainian) were a tribe of Early East Slavs, which inhabited the territories down the stream of the Pripyat River and northern parts of the Right-bank Dnieper river (the borders of the tribes domain are still not eastablished... The Radimichs (Радимичи in Russian; Радимичі in Ukrainian), were a tribe of Early East Slavs of the last few centuries of the 1st millennium, which inhabited upper east parts of the Dnieper down the Sozh River and its tributaries. ... This article describes the history of Belarus. ... The Belarusian or Belorussian language (беларуская мова, BGN/PCGN: byelaruskaya mova, Scientific: bjelaruskaja mova) is the language of the Belarusian people and is spoken in Belarus and abroad, chiefly in Russia, Ukraine, Poland. ... The banner of White Ruthenia White Ruthenia (Ruthénie Blanche in French), 1918. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pravapis.org - Belarusian language - Svoja (New language of Belarusian minority in Poland) (2327 words)
The number of "officially attested" Belarusians in Poland is significantly lower than the optimistic estimates voiced by activists of Poland's Belarusian minority at various public forums in the 1980s and 1990s (from 150,000-250,000), but notably higher than the most pessimistic predictions made by the very same activists privately, in their own minority circle (10,000-20,000).
Belarusian as a language of domestic communication was declared by 39,900 people in Podlasie Province (82 percent of the total number of Belarusians in the province).
Belarusian linguist Khvedar Klimchuk, a specialist in the East Slavonic dialects of the Bialystok region in particular and of the Western Palesse of the Republic of Belarus in general, proposed a very elegant classification in this regard.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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