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Encyclopedia > Bel and the dragon
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Bible, English, King James, Bel

The tale of Bel and the Dragon is from chapter 14 of the Book of Daniel. This chapter, along with chapter 13, is referred to as deuterocanonical, in that it is not universally accepted among Christians as belonging to the Bible. The story is typically not included in Protestant Bibles. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The Book of Daniel, written in Hebrew and Aramaic, is a book in both the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) and the Christian Old Testament. ... The deuterocanonical books are the books that Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodoxy, Ethiopian Orthodoxy, and Oriental Orthodoxy include in the Old Testament that were not part of the Jewish Tanakh. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


It is believed by some scholars to have been written in the late 2nd century BC and accounted apocryphal by Protestants. The chapter is formed of three independent narratives, which place the culture-hero Daniel at the court of Cyrus, king of the Persians: "When King Astyages was laid to rest with his ancestors, Cyrus the Persian succeeded to his kingdom." There Daniel "was a companion of the king, and was the most honored of all his Friends" (14:1). (3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) // Events 175 BCE - Antiochus IV Epiphanes, took possession of the Syrian throne, at the murder of his brother Seleucus IV Philopator, which rightly belonged to his nephew Demetrius I Soter. ... Apocrypha (from the Greek word απόκρυφα meaning those having been hidden away[1]) are texts of uncertain authenticity or writings where the authorship is questioned. ... Daniel (Hebrew: דָּנִיֵּאל; transliterated as Daniyyel in Standard Hebrew and Dāniyyêl in Tiberian Hebrew, Arabic: Danyel, دانيال) is the name of at least three people from the Hebrew Bible: A Jewish exile in Babylon, the subject of the Book of Daniel and the most well-known of the three Daniels. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Astyages (so-called by Herodotos; called Astyigas by Ctesias, and Aspadas by Diodorus; Akkadian: Ishtumegu) (reigned 585 BCE-550 BCE) was the son of King Cyaxares, and the last king of the Median Empire. ...


The narrative of Bel (14:1–22) is a folk tale ridiculing worship. In it, the king asks Daniel "Do you not think that Bel is a living god? Do you not see how much he eats and drinks every day?" Daniel proves through a ruse that the sacred meal of Bel is actually consumed at night by the seventy priests and their wives and children, who entered through a secret door when the temple's doors were sealed. The priests and their wives and children are killed, and Daniel is permitted to destroy the idol of Bel and the temple. This version has been cited as an ancestor of the "locked room mystery". Bel, signifying lord or master, is a title rather than a genuine name, applied to various gods in Babylonian relgion. ... Secret passages are sometimes concealed using large items of furniture, such as this reconstruction of the bookcase that covered the entrance to Anne Franks secret room. ... In crime fiction, a locked room mystery (or cosy) is a particular kind of mystery story, where a murder is apparently committed under impossible circumstances: no one could have entered or left the scene of the crime, and it could not have been a suicide. ...


In the brief companion narrative of the Dragon (14:23–30), "there was a great dragon, which the Babylonians revered." In this case the supposed god is no idol, but not all that eats is divine: Daniel slew the dragon by making cakes of pitch, fat and hair. The dragon ate them and burst open. Now the Babylonians were indignant. "The king has become a Jew; he has destroyed Bel, and killed the dragon, and slaughtered the priests," they said, and demanded that Daniel be handed over to them. Saint George versus the dragon, Gustave Moreau, c. ...


The third narrative (14:31–42), Daniel in the Lions' Den, is apparently Daniel's 1st or 2nd trip. It has been made into a consequence of the preceding episode, but the Septuagint precedes it with the notice: "From the prophecy of Habakkuk, son of Jesus, of the tribe of Levi." Daniel remained unharmed in the den with seven lions, fed by the miraculous transportation of the prophet Habakkuk. "On the seventh day the king came to mourn for Daniel. When he came to the den he looked in, and there sat Daniel! The king shouted with a loud voice, "You are great, O Lord, the God of Daniel, and there is no other besides you!" Then he pulled Daniel out, and threw into the den those who had attempted his destruction, and they were instantly eaten before his eyes." Some have suggested that the Daniel in Bel and the Dragon is different from that of Daniel 1-13. The Septuagint: A page from Codex vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Brentons English translation. ... Habakkuk or Havakuk (חֲבַקּוּק, Standard Hebrew Ḥavaqquq, Tiberian Hebrew Ḥăḇaqqûq) was a prophet in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ...

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See also

The Apocrypha book "Bel and the Dragon" clearly contradicts the Scripture. The book of Daniel in chapter 6 says that Daniel was only in the lions den for one night while Bel says that Daniel was there for seven days total. And that is just the start! The book of Bel excludes completely the fact that Daniel prayed to God three times a day, which is the whole reason for him being thrown into the den in the first place (in the book of Daniel, that is)! The prophet Habakkuk was never mentioned as coming to the den and giving Daniel stew. He was picked up by his hair by an angel and carried to the den? God can do anything, that is true, but I do not believe that he sent another angel to carry a man by his hair to bring food to Daniel's den. You cannot say that the story of Bel and the Dragon isn't completely ridiculous! Why does Bel and the Dragon say that Daniel was put into the den because the people were mad at the king for becoming a Jew? The true book of Daniel says that he was put into the den because he was favored by the king and would not worship their gods or the king, and according to the law that the king had signed, that is what happened to those who disobeyed the law. There is so much more wrong with this book. All you have to do is look! The Book of Daniel, written in Hebrew and Aramaic, is a book in both the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) and the Christian Old Testament. ... The deuterocanonical books are the books that Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodoxy, Ethiopian Orthodoxy, and Oriental Orthodoxy include in the Old Testament that were not part of the Jewish Tanakh. ...


Response:
What has been written above is very misleading. All one needs to do is completely read Daniel 6 and Daniel 14 and one will come to the understanding that they are two seperate events. One event tells of how Daniel was cast into the lions den for one night for transgressing King Darius the Mede's edict. The second event was when Daniel was thrown into the lion's den for 6 days for proving to a different king, from a different empire (Babylon), that the priests were frauds AND for killing the dragon whom the Babylonians worshipped.

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Bel and the Dragon - definition of Bel and the Dragon in Encyclopedia (412 words)
Do you not see how much he eats and drinks every day?" Daniel proves through a ruse that the sacred meal of Bel is actually consumed at night by the seventy priests and their wives and children, who entered through a secret door when the temple's doors were sealed.
The priests and their wives and children are killed, and Daniel is permitted to destroy the idol of Bel and the temple.
In the brief companion narrative of the Dragon (14:23 - 30), "there was a great dragon, which the Babylonians revered." In this case the supposed god is no idol, but not all that eats is divine: Daniel slew the dragon by making cakes of pitch, fat and hair.
Bel And The Dragon (1178 words)
Bel 1:18 And as soon as he had opened the dour, the king looked upon the table, and cried with a loud voice, Great art thou, O Bel, and with thee is no deceit at all.
Bel 1:21 And took the priests with their wives and children, who shewed him the privy doors, where they came in, and consumed such things as were upon the table.
Bel 1:28 When they of Babylon heard that, they took great indignation, and conspired against the king, saying, The king is become a Jew, and he hath destroyed Bel, he hath slain the dragon, and put the priests to death.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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