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Encyclopedia > Beer pong
Beer pong
Players typically 2 teams of 2
Age range legal drinking age, however widely played by underage participants
Setup time 2 minutes
Playing time 10-20 minutes or less
Random chance Easy
Skills required aiming, taunting and alcohol tolerance

Beer pong (also called beirut, lob pong, and other names) is a drinking game in which players throw a table tennis ball across a table with the intent of landing the ball in one of several cups of beer on the other end. The game typically consists of two two-player teams, one on each side of a table, and a number of cups set up on each side.[1] There are no official rules, so rules may vary widely, though usually there are six or ten plastic cups arranged in a triangle on each side. The number of players on a team can vary as well, from one to three or more. When referring to the game using table tennis paddles, the rules of Beer Pong are relatively close to those of table tennis and thus presumably emerged as an adaptation of table tennis into a drinking game. ... Image File history File links Beer_Pong_Scene. ... Drinking games are games which involve the drinking of beer or other alcoholic beverages. ... Ping Pong redirects here. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ...


When a ball lands in a cup, the defending team must consume all of the beer inside that cup. The game is won by eliminating all the other team's cups before one's own cups are eliminated. The losing team must then consume all the beer remaining in the winning team's cups.[1] The order of play varies – both players on one team shoot followed by both players on the other team, or players on opposite teams can alternate back and forth.[2]


Today, beer pong is played at parties, North American colleges and universities[3][4] and elsewhere, such as tailgating or other sporting events.[5] The game is also played by high school students, despite the fact that furnishing alcohol to persons under the age of 21 is illegal in the United States.[6][7] In 2008, beer pong was first reported to be played within the academic community in Europe. Presumably it was US scholars, bored by the lack of diversity of US-American beer brands, that went into exile and spread the game there. The legal drinking age is a limit assigned by governments to restrict the access of children and youth to alcoholic beverages. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Exile (band) may refer to: Exile - The American country music band Exile - The Japanese pop music band Category: ...


Although the preceding guidelines are common, the rules may be subject to a wide variety of modifications and additions that often vary based on the area of the country, the state, or even the house in which a particular game is played.

Contents

Origin

The game is a spin-off of a similar game, also called pong, which uses ping pong paddles and was said to have been created at Hughies Shed in Pitman, New Jersey.[8] A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... When referring to the game using table tennis paddles, the rules of Beer Pong are relatively close to those of table tennis and thus presumably emerged as an adaptation of table tennis into a drinking game. ...


The most common modern version of the game is played without paddles and has a murkier beginning. Richard Geddes and Frank Peterson are the founders of beer pong (beirut). The Daily Princetonian, the student newspaper of Princeton University, attributed the naming of the paddle-less game where balls are thrown into cups to the early 1980s at Bucknell University or Lehigh University.[8] Many students at Lafayette College, rivals of Lehigh, insist modern, paddle-less Beirut was invented at their school, but The Lafayette, the college's student newspaper, says there is no proof to back up the assertion.[9] The Daily Princetonian is the daily student newspaper of Princeton University. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Bucknell University is a private university located along the Susquehanna River in the rolling countryside of Central Pennsylvania in the town of Lewisburg, 60 miles (97 km) north of Harrisburg. ... Lehigh University is a private, co-educational university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the United States. ... Lafayette College is a private coeducational liberal arts and engineering college located in Easton, Pennsylvania, USA. The school, founded in 1826 by citizens of Easton, first began holding classes in 1832. ...


Nomenclature

The meaning of the terms Beer pong and Beirut may vary depending on where the game is played. Beer pong is the more common name of the game, with a CollegeHumor survey showing that 77% of respondents called it "Beer pong," versus 23% for "Beirut".[10] Andrew Ronald Derek McGowan Had created this awesome site For the Early 20th Century humor magazine, see College Humor. ...


The naming of "Beirut" is disputed. The Daily Princetonian suggests that the name was coined at Bucknell or Lehigh around the time of the Lebanese Civil War, Beirut being the capital of Lebanon and scene of much fighting.[8] Belligerents Lebanese Front Syria LNM PLO Amal Israel Commanders Bachir Gemayel Dany Chamoun Kamal Jumblatt Yasser Arafat Ariel Sharon The Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990) was a multifaceted civil war whose antecedents trace back to the conflicts and political compromises reached after the end of Lebanons administration by the... This article is about the Lebanese city. ...


Setup

This diagram illustrates a standard set up for a game of beer pong, with either 6 or 10 cups being used.
This diagram illustrates a standard set up for a game of beer pong, with either 6 or 10 cups being used.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (512x797, 49 KB) Summary I created this image use Microsoft Visio Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (512x797, 49 KB) Summary I created this image use Microsoft Visio Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Teams

Beer pong is usually played with two teams of two persons each. Each team begins the game standing at either end of the table behind their rack of cups.[1]


Playing field

According to the World Series of Beer Pong, the regulation table size is 8 × 2 feet (2.44 × 0.61 meters), and it stands 27.5 inches (69.8 centimeters) above the ground.[11] Although the game is typically played on either a ping pong table or a folding banquet table, beer pong enthusiasts may create a personalized table for use by friends and visitors. In general, this will be a plywood board cut to proper size, sometimes painted with sports, school, or fraternity symbols and given a liquid-proof coating.[12] Towers of Hanoi constructed from plywood. ...


Equipment

The most common cups used are Solo or Dixie 16 ounce cups. These cups have ridge-lines which can be used precisely to measure the amount of beer to be poured.[13] On each side of the table, teams assemble equilateral triangles, with the convergence point focusing on the other team.[1] Games typically use either six, ten, or fifteen cups.[1] A basic 16 ounce Solo cup. ... Dixie Cup is the brand name for a line of disposable paper cups that were first developed in the United States the early 20th century to improve public hygiene. ...


38 mm or 40 mm table tennis (ping pong) balls are typically used for game play.[14] Ping Pong redirects here. ...


Alcohol

Usually an inexpensive pale lager or light beer of 3.2-5% abv (for example, Bud Light, Natural Light, Keystone Light, or Coors Light) is used since large quantities may be consumed during the course of several games.[4] The game may be played without beer, as is done at Utah State University, a dry campus, where root beer is used instead.[15] (North) American lagers, as defined by the Association of Brewers, are a family of very pale to golden colored beers with light body and low to medium bitterness. ... Light beer refers to beer which is reduced in alcohol content, or in calories, compared to regular beers. ... Alcohol by volume (ABV) is an indication of how much alcohol (expressed as a percentage) is included in an alcoholic beverage. ... Anheuser_Busch (NYSE: BUD), the worlds third largest brewing company in volume after InBev and SABMiller, is based in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. The company brews 35 different beers and malt liquors. ... Natural Ice Natural Ice, also know as Natty Ice on ad posters, is a macro lager made by Anheuser-Busch introduced in the 1980s. ... Standard Keystone Light can. ... Coors Brewing Company logo The Coors Brewing Company (NYSE: RKY) is one of the worlds largest brewers of beer. ... Utah State University (USU) is a public land-grant university whose main campus is located in Logan, Utah. ... Dry may refer to: Dry, an album by PJ Harvey. ... A glass of root beer with foam Root beer is a beverage also known as Sasparilla outside of North America. ...


Game play

Teams have many possibilities for reracks.
Teams have many possibilities for reracks.

There are very few universal beer pong rules. Typically, players abide by a uniform set of "house rules", which are often consistent within one university or region of the country (e.g., "Ivy League rules" or "West Coast rules"), or may vary on a house-by-house basis.[16] Number of cups, bouncing, amount of alcohol, the distance shots must be taken from, etcetera, all may vary. Image File history File links Beerpong_reracks. ... Image File history File links Beerpong_reracks. ...


In some house rules, players must immediately drink any cup that has been hit. Failure to do so incurs a penalty, such as drinking more beer or losing the game.[17]


Some houses allow for re-racking, which is also known as rearranging or consolidation. This is when teams can get their cups rearrangements into different formations once or twice and even more as dictated by the rules of the house.[18] For example, a team with three remaining cups may ask the other team to "re-rack" their multiple targets into a single triangle formation. In the event that a "lone cup" is left one the table, a player can call lone cup infinetely and upon hitting the cup is awarded a bonus cup.


After shooting, teams may dunk the ping pong balls into cups of water in order to wash the balls off. However, research showed that the wash cups still hold bacteria, such as E. coli.[19][20] See also Entamoeba coli. ...


Some other house rules consist of:

  • Swatting the ball away if it bounces
  • If the ball spins around the cup, male players may finger the ball out and females may blow the ball out

Shot techniques

The typical path for the different kinds of shots.
The typical path for the different kinds of shots.

There are three major ways to shoot in beer pong: the arc, the fastball, and the bounce. The most common throwing technique is the "arc", where one grasps the ping pong ball with the tips of the thumb and forefinger, holds the arm at an angle with the ball upwards, then throw by using gentle elbow motion, holding the upper arm parallel with the table.[16] Image File history File links Beerpong_shots. ... Image File history File links Beerpong_shots. ...


Some players throw "fastball" style, which uses more of a hard chopping motion to send the ball in a more direct line to the intended target cup.[16]


A "bounce" is performed by bouncing the ball toward the cups. Since the other team has the opportunity to swat away a bounced ball, a bounce is usually worth two cups. The "muck" bounce is a low trajectory shot achieved by bouncing the ball in a sideways motion as opposed to overhand.[16]


Winning the game

If the opposing team makes the last cup, the other team must usually make either all remaining cups or simply one cup, depending on "house rules", or the opposing team wins - this is called a rebuttal or redemption.[18][16]


A shutout rule is a house rule usually stated before a game or during the game in the midst of a shutout. If the shutout does occur the losing team must do whatever the two teams decided on, such as going streaking.[18] This rule has colloquially been referred to as the "naked lap."[21] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Streaking (microbiology) and Streak. ...


Legal restrictions

Former Steeler and 2006 candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania Lynn Swann plays beer pong with and courts voters before a football game.
Former Steeler and 2006 candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania Lynn Swann plays beer pong with and courts voters before a football game.[22]

Some municipalities and states have attempted to ban beer pong, either from bars or in general. In Oxford, Ohio, where Miami University is located, the city council tried to ban the game from being played outdoors,[23] and in Arlington, Virginia, bar owners were told to stop allowing the game to be played in their establishments.[1] In the fall of 2007, Georgetown University officially banned all beer pong paraphernalia, such as custom-built tables and the possession of many ping-pong balls.[24] Some writers have mentioned beer pong as contributing to "out of control" college drinking.[25][26] Steelers redirects here. ... The Pennsylvania gubernatorial election of 2006 will be held on November 7, 2006, and will include the races for the Governor of Pennsylvania and Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania. ... List of Pennsylvania Governors The office of Pennsylvania governor was created by the states Constitution of 1790. ... Lynn Curtis Swann (b. ... Oxford is a city in northwestern Butler County, Ohio, United States, in the southwestern portion of the state. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Father John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ...


Tournaments and leagues

National Beer pong tournaments are held in the United States. Some of the larger tournaments held in the United States are the World Series of Beer Pong and those hosted by the World Pong Tour. The World Series of Beer Pong (WSOBP), hosted by bpong.com, is the largest beer pong tournament in the world. WSOBP III, held in January 2008 in Las Vegas, NV, had a $50,000 grand prize and attracted 600 participants nationwide. A more common and decentralized organization of beer pong games is small leagues. Ordinarily, a group of college students or other pong enthusiasts will create teams (partnerships) and play weekly against each other, such as at the University of California, Santa Barbara with the "Isla Vista Beer Pong League",[27] and at New York University.[28] The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a research-oriented[2] public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one of ten campuses of the University of California. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ...


Beer pong at the international level

In Germany, Europe, beer pong has recently made its international debut. At Hannover, north-German city, US-American academic exiles who were forced into emmigration by the rather uniform taste of US beer introduced the game to scholars of the University of Hannover, now named after the philosopher, mathematician, and universal natural scientist Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. In this regard it is only too appropriate that it were mainly scholars of Geology from Minnessota and of Philosophy from Princeton that carried the good news across the ocean. However, it was rather the availability of beer brands like wheat beer, "Flens", a 4.8% Pilsener and even the local brew "Herrenhauser Pilsener", produced by the Herrenhauser Brewery that encouraged these pioneers of international sportsmanship to attempt to spread the game throughout the world. It is the large variety of beer brands that made the game so much more diverse, and hence its outcome much more unpredictable. No doubt the game has all potential to spread rapidly amongst the European academic community. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... , Hanover(i) (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... Emigration is the act and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country to settle abroad. ... Taste (or, more formally, gustation) is a form of direct chemoreception and is one of the traditional five senses. ... The University of Hannover (Universität Hannover) has its seat in the city of Hannover, the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Gottfried Leibniz Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (July 1, 1646 in Leipzig - November 14, 1716 in Hannover) was a German philosopher, scientist, mathematician, diplomat, librarian, and lawyer of Sorb descent. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... It has been suggested that Kristall Weissbier be merged into this article or section. ... Original Pilsner Urquell Pilsener or pilsner is a pale lager, developed in the 19th century in the city of Pilsen, Bohemia (Plzeň in the Czech Republic). ... It is sporting to shake the hand of ones opponent after the end of a game. ...


Beer pong in the media

The Wall Street Journal and other media outlets have reported on the increase is businesses selling beer pong paraphernalia, such as tables, mats, cups, or clothes.[29] The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...


Last Cup: Road to the World Series of Beer Pong[30] is a documentary which follows some competitive players as they prepare for the WSOBP II and ultimately compete against one another for the $20,000 grand prize. This documentary, directed by Dan Lindsay, recently premiered at the CineVegas film festival on June 13th, 2008. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The game also appears in the Nintendo Wii games Game Party[31] and Frat Party Games: Pong Toss. For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... seven games in this exclusive Wii party game from Midway. ...


Bud Pong

Bud Pong was the branded version of beer pong that brewer Anheuser-Busch said involved the drinking of water, not Budweiser or any other beer. In the summer of 2005, the company began marketing "Bud Pong" kits to its distributors. Francine I. Katz, vice president for communications and consumer affairs, was reported in The New York Times as saying that Bud Pong was not intended for underage drinkers because promotions were held in bars, not on campuses. And it did not promote binge drinking, she said, because official rules call for water to be used, not beer.[32] For the other beer named Budweiser, see Budějovický Budvar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


The New York Times quoted a bartender at a club near Clemson University as saying she had worked at several Bud Pong events and had "never seen anyone playing with water. It's always beer. It's just like any other beer pong."[32] Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. ...


Some expressed incredulity at Anheuser-Busch's public statements. Henry Wechsler, director of the College Alcohol Study at the Harvard School of Public Health, said: "Why would alcohol companies promote games that involve drinking water? It's preposterous,"[32] while advertising news site Adjab opined that "someone playing Bud Pong with water is about as likely as a teenage kid using the rolling paper he bought at the convenience store to smoke tobacco."[33] Rolling papers are small sheets, rolls, or leaves of paper which are sold for rolling ones own cigarettes either by hand or with a rolling machine. ...


External links

  • Bpong.com, the World Series of Beer Pong
  • Pong Rules, a beer pong rules wiki
  • Beer pong at Latin Wikipedia
  • Beer Pong, The Original Beer Pong (with Paddles)

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Shott, Chris (October 7, 2005). The Pong Arm of the Law. The Washington City Paper. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  2. ^ Bpong.com
  3. ^ Rolph, Amy (2007). Harried students walk a tightrope. Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved on 2007-12-27.
  4. ^ a b Corbett, Jill (2005). Beer Pong!. UWeekly. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  5. ^ Peter Fimrite, Hordes run, walk or stumble at Bay to Breakers, San Francisco Chronicle
  6. ^ Flynn, Courtney; Wang, Andrew (2007-07-22). Parents guilty of permitting underage drinking. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  7. ^ Larkin, Daphne (2007-12-14). Facebook party photos result in sanctions, discussions at U-32 High School. Montpelier Barre Times-Argus. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  8. ^ a b c Berner, Laura (2004). On language, Princeton style: The history of 'Beirut'. Daily Princetonian. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  9. ^ Shoemaker, Jeff (2006). Lafayette: The Birthplace of Beer Pong. The Lafayette. Retrieved on 2007-12-21.
  10. ^ Beer Pong vs. Beirut: What is the game called?. CollegeHumor (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-25.
  11. ^ Beer pong rules, World Series of Beer Pong
  12. ^ Advice on building Beer Pong Tables. Terrapin Tables (2005). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  13. ^ http://www.freepatentsonline.com/20040188942.html
  14. ^ http://www.freepatentsonline.com/20060065665.html
  15. ^ "Students At Utah State Play 'Drinking Game' With Root Beer Instead", KUTV-TV
  16. ^ a b c d e Beer pong rules, Beerpong.com
  17. ^ Official OSU Rules: Beer Pong. Ohio State OTR (2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  18. ^ a b c http://www.nbpl.net/rulesno.html
  19. ^ Clay Travis, "The essence of beer pong bacteria" CBS Sportsline
  20. ^ Nour Hammour, "Beer pong bacteria", The GW Hatchet
  21. ^ http://www.pongstuff.com/beer-pong-rules.php
  22. ^ Ritter, Kara. "Ex-Steeler looks to sway support of Eagles' fans", Philadelphia Inquirer, 2006-08. 
  23. ^ Strader, Sean (February 23, 2007). Council vote freezes beer pong ban. The Oxford Press. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  24. ^ News | The Hoya
  25. ^ Granwehr, Meredith Austin (December 1, 2007). College Drinking: Out of Control. Hartford Courant. Retrieved on 2007-12-27.
  26. ^ Minnesota Public Radio
  27. ^ Smith, Ashley Nikole (April 24, 2007). Students Create I.V. Beer Pong League. Daily Nexus (University of California, Santa Barbara). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  28. ^ Kfoury, Branden (November 15, 2005). Even at chic NYU, beer pong prevails. Washington Square News (NYU). Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  29. ^ Shelly Banjo, "Thwock, Gulp, Kaching! Beer Pong Inspires Inventors" Wall Street Journal
  30. ^ CineVegas description
  31. ^ Okeefe, Billy (December 21, 2007). Want to party alone? Wii game isn't for you. The Olympian. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  32. ^ a b c Gettleman, Jeffrey (October 16, 2005). As Young Adults Drink to Win, Marketers Join In. New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  33. ^ Finley, Adam (October 18, 2005). Beer Pong promotions not so good. Ad-Jab. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.

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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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I never, also commonly known as 10 fingers or Never have I ever, is a common drinking game, where players are arranged into something resembling a circle. ... Image File history File links Beer_mug. ... When referring to the game using table tennis paddles, the rules of Beer Pong are relatively close to those of table tennis and thus presumably emerged as an adaptation of table tennis into a drinking game. ... Dartmouth pong is a drinking game played at Dartmouth College that is loosely based on ping pong. ... A slam pong player at Dartmouth Colleges Phi Tau Coeducation Fraternity. ... 7-11-doubles is drinking game that uses dice. ... Beer Die, a gentlemans game, is a drinking game involving four people, a die, a table, four cups, and beer. ... A boat race is a drinking game between (usually) two teams of equal numbers. ... Chandeliers is a drinking game that is a spinoff of Quarters. ... Flip Cup, also known as Flipper, Flippy Cup, Taps, Tippy Cup, Flippity Whippity, Cups, Canoe, Turbos or Turbo Cups, is a team-based drinking game. ... This article is about the drinking game. ... Moose is the name of a drinking game that involves players bouncing a quarter off of a table in an attempt to have the quarter land, without another bounce, in an ice cube tray on that table. ... For other uses, see Quarter. ... This article is about the drinking game version. ... Connections is a card game that is used for a drinking game. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Horserace is a drinking game in which players place bets on a particular suit of cards, cheer their selected horse on as it races, and drink according to the outcome. ... Kings (also less commonly known as Kings Cup, Four Kings, Circle of Death, or Ring of Fire) is a popular drinking game. ... Pyramid is a card game that is used for a drinking game. ... Ride the bus is a drinking game played through using a standard pack of cards and enough alcohol to support the required players. ... Drinking too much alcohol may qualify as binge drinking if it leads to at least two days of inebriation and the drinker neglects usual responsibilities The British Medical Association states that there is no consensus on the definition of binge drinking. ... A Case Race is an American Drinking game involving a competition to see which team or individual can finish a case (most commonly a case of beer) first. ... Centurion, also known as Kodak 100 challenge Century Club and Century Clock in North America, is a drinking game, popular within the United Kingdom student population. ... Fortyhands Participants Edward Fortyhands (also known as 80 Ounces to Freedom or The 40 Challenge) is a drinking game in which each player duct tapes a 40 oz. ... Beer bong redirects here. ... Typical form for a keg stand Keg stand (sometimes known as getting vertical ) is often considered a drinking ritual using a beer keg, but it is not always competitive. ... Shotgunning is a means of consuming a canned beverage, especially beer, very quickly by a particular technique involving punching a hole in the side of the can. ... This article is about the measurement of beer known as the yard. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


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Beer pong - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5936 words)
Beer Pong (also known as Beirut) is an American drinking game that involves propelling a table tennis ball across a table with the aim of making the ball land in one of several cups of beer.
Slam Pong is a form of beer pong with a paddle that has been popular at colleges and universities in the northeastern United States.
A variation of beer pong where the ball is live as soon as it is thrown and either team may recover or rebound the ball as soon as it touches table, cup or ground.
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