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Encyclopedia > Bedrich Smetana
The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. The correct title is Bedřich Smetana.
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Bedrich Smetana's statue in Plzen

Bedřich Smetana (March 2, 1824 Litomyšl - May 12, 1884 Prague) was a Czech composer, remembered especially for his set of six symphonic poems Má vlast (My Country).


Smetana was a son of a brewer. He studied piano and violin from a young age, and played in the amateur string quartet that other members of his family were in. Smetana attended a high school in Plzen in 1840-1843. He studied music in Prague, despite initial resistance from his father. He secured a post as music master to a noble family, and in 1848 received funds from Franz Liszt to establish his own music school.


In 1856, Smetana went to Gothenburg in Sweden, where he taught, conducted and gave chamber music recitals. In 1863, back in Prague, he opened another school of music, this one dedicated to promoting a specifically Czech music. In 1874, syphilis caused him to become deaf, but he continued to compose, with Má vlast being written largely after this event. His first string quartet, Z mého života (From My Life), is an autobiographical work, which mimics the tinnitus he suffered from while deaf.


In 1883 Smetana became insane, and was taken to a mental hospital in Prague, where he died the following year. He is interred in the Vyšehrad cemetery in Prague.


Smetana is noted as being the first composer to write music that was specifically Czech in character. Many of his operas are on Czech themes, the best known being the comedy, The Bartered Bride (1866). He used many Czech dance rhythms and his melodies sometimes resemble folk songs. He was a great influence on Antonín Dvořák, who similarly used Czech themes in his works.


A complete chronological list of Smetana's operas:

  • Braniboři v Čechách (The Brandenburgers in Bohemia)
  • Prodaná nevěsta (The Bartered Bride)
  • Dalibor
  • Libuše
  • Dvě vdovy (The Two Widows)
  • Hubička (The Kiss)
  • Tajemství (The Secret)
  • Čertova stěna (The Devil's Wall)

External links

  • Dictionary of Czech music: Bedrich Smetana (http://www.czechmusic.com/dictionary1/14.html)
  • The Composers of Bohemia (http://members.aol.com/abelard2/bohemia.htm)









  Results from FactBites:
 
BedĹ™ich Smetana - Wikipedia (303 words)
In 1848 financierde Franz Liszt Smetana, zodat hij zijn eigen muziekschool kon oprichten.
In 1856 ging Smetana naar Gotenburg in Zweden waar hij het dirigeren onderwees en kamermuziekrecitals gaf.
Als gevolg van de syfilis werd Smetana geestesziek en hij werd in 1883 in een psychiatrische kliniek in Praag opgenomen, waar hij een jaar later op 60-jarige leeftijd is overleden.
BedĹ™ich Smetana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (456 words)
Bedřich Smetana listen (♫) (March 2, 1824 Litomyšl - May 12, 1884 Prague) was a Czech composer, whose best-known composition is the symphonic poem Vltava (The Moldau), second of a cycle of six, Má vlast (My Country).
In 1883 Smetana, suffering further progressive neurological effects of his syphilis, finally became insane, and was taken to a mental hospital in Prague, where he died the following year.
Smetana is noted as being the first composer to write music that was specifically Czech in character.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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