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Encyclopedia > Beats per minute

Beats per minute (BPM) is a unit typically used as either a measure of tempo in music, or a measure of one's heart rate. A rate of 60 bpm means that one beat will occur every second. One bpm is equal to 1/60 Hz. The first two measures of Mozarts Sonata XI, which indicates the tempo as Andante grazioso and the metronome marking as = 120. (Metronome markings were not used in Mozarts day. ... Heart rate is used to describe the frequency of the cardiac cycle. ... The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the SI unit of frequency. ...


The BPM tempo of a piece of music is conventionally shown in its score as a metronome mark: The first two measures of Mozarts Sonata XI, which indicates the tempo as Andante grazioso and the metronome marking as = 120. (Metronome markings were not used in Mozarts day. ...


. Image File history File links Music-metronome. ...


This indicates that there should be 120 crochet beats per minute. In simple time signatures it is conventional to show the tempo in terms of the note duration on the bottom. So a 4/4 would show a crochet, as above, while a 2/2 would show a minim. In music, a quarter note (American or German terminology) or crotchet (British or classical terminology) is a note played for one quarter of the duration of a whole note (or semibreve). ... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational device used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each bar and which note value (minim, crotchet, eighth note and so on) constitutes one beat. ... In music, a quarter note (American or German terminology) or crotchet (British or classical terminology) is a note played for one quarter of the duration of a whole note (or semibreve). ... In music, a half note (American) or minim is a note played for one half the duration of a whole note, hence the name. ...


In compound time signatures the beat consists of three note durations (so there are 3 quavers per beat in a 6/8 time signature), so a dotted form of the next note duration up is used. The most common compound signatures: 6/8, 9/8, and 12/8, therefore use a dotted crochet to indicate their BPM. Figure 1. ...


Exotic time and particularly slow time signatures may indicate their BPM tempo using other note durations.

Contents

Typical Beat per Minutes by Genre

[Genres and Attributes]


Dance Music

Beats per minute became common terminology in popular music during the disco era because of its usefulness to DJs, and remain important in dance music. For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Electronic dance music be merged into this article or section. ...


In this context the beats measured are either crochets in the time signature (sometimes called down-beats, although the term is ambiguous), or drum beats (typically bass-drum or another functionally similar synthesized sound), whichever is more frequent. Higher BPM values are therefore achievable by increasing the number of drum beats, without increasing the tempo of the music.


Hip hop typically uses a BPM tempo of 70-110, while house music is faster: 110-140BPM. Jungle music goes even faster: 140-190. gabber and Speedcore music exceeds 200 BPM with an underlying crochet tempo of around 100-120. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Drum and bass (commonly abbreviated to DnB, drum n bass or drum & bass) is a type of electronic dance music also known as jungle. ... Gabber, gabba (pronounced gahba or gahbuhr in Dutch), or hardcore, is a subgenre of electronic music that is a subgenre of hardcore techno. ... The introduction to this article is too long. ...


Extreme BPM

More extreme BPMs are achievable at the same underlying tempo with a very fast drum patterns, or a drum roll. Again, these have a much slower underlying tempo, but increase the BPM by adding additional percussive beats. The Speedcore subgenre claims to top 1000 BPM[citation needed] using this method. A drum roll is a method a percussionist employs to produce a sustained sound on a drum. ... The introduction to this article is too long. ...


The human ear can distinguish separate pulses up to a frequency of around 15Hz (900 BPM)[citation needed], thereafter the pulses are perceived as a single sound, and beyond around 1200 BPM (20Hz) as a bass frequency and harmonics. This places a natural perceptual limit on the actual BPM of a track, although the PR value of claiming a high BPM is unaffected by whether it can actually be discerned by a human listener.


Beatmatching

Beatmatching, an art amongst DJs, concerns the speeding up or down of a record in order to match the BPM of a previous track so both can be flawlessly mixed. Beatmatching is a technique employed by DJs to transition between two songs while performing either live at a club or event, for radio broadcast or for distribution on prerecorded mix tapes/cds, achieved by changing the tempo of a new track to match that of the currently playing track, then...


DJs often beatmatch the underlying tempos of recordings, rather than their strict BPM, particularly when dealing with high BPM tracks. A 240 BPM track, for example, will normally match the beat of a 120 BPM track without slowing down or speeding up, because both are likely to have an underlying tempo of 120 crochets per minute.


Normally, the pitch and BPM of a track are linked: spin a disc 10% faster and both pitch and tempo will be 10% higher. Software processing to change the pitch without changing the tempo, or vice-versa, is called time-stretching or pitch-shifting. While it works fairly well for small adjustments (± 20%), the result can be noisy and unmusical for larger changes. Time stretching is the process of changing the speed or duration of an audio signal without affecting its pitch. ... Time stretching is the process of changing the speed or duration of an audio signal without affecting its pitch. ...


BPM can be calculated by hand (count the number of bass drums per 60 seconds, or - to be fast - per 15 seconds and multiply by 4), but some software programs such as MixMeister, Traktor-DJ and PC-DJ can do it automatically by listening for regular volume peaks at low frequencies.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Beats per minute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (286 words)
Beats per minute (bpm) is a unit typically used as either a measure of tempo in music, or a measure of one's heart rate.
Beats per minute became common terminology in popular music during the disco era because of its usefulness to DJs, and remain important in dance music.
BPM can be calculated by hand (count the number of downbeats/bass drums per 60 seconds, or - to be fast - per 15 seconds and multiply by 4), but some software programs such as MixMeister, Traktor-DJ and PC-DJ can do it automatically.
Tempo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1403 words)
This means that a particular note value (for example, a quarter note or crotchet) is specified as the beat, and the marking indicates that a certain number of these beats must be played per minute.
Mathematical tempo markings of this kind became increasingly popular during the first half of the 19th century, after the metronome had been invented, although early metronomes were somewhat unreliable; Beethoven's metronome markings, in particular, are notoriously unreliable.
Most musicians would agree that it is not possible to give beats per minute (BPM) equivalents for these terms; the actual number of beats per minute in a piece marked allegro, for example, will depend on the music itself.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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