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Encyclopedia > Beatification

In Catholicism, beatification (from Latin beatus, blessed, via Greek μακάριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead person's accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in his or her name (intercession of saints). As far as the word "beatification" is concerned, its use most likely does not antedate the fourth century, when it was introduced in the church at Carthage, but the fact is certainly older. In the earlier ages this honor was entirely local and passed from one diocese to another with the permission of their bishops. This is clear from the fact that early Christian cemeteries contain paintings only of local martyrs. The history of the process is more closely examined in the article on canonization. The world map called St. ... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic - from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1] - is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... St. ... Heaven is a concept found in many religions or spiritual philosophies, typically described as the Holiest place, accessible according to standards of divinity (goodness, etc. ... Intercession of the saints is a Christian doctrine common to the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. ... Ruins of Roman-era Carthage For other uses, see Carthage (disambiguation). ... Canonization is the process of declaring someone a saint and involves proving that a candidate has lived in such a way that he or she qualifies for this. ...


Some of the beatifications by bishops in the Middle Ages are almost scandalous by modern standards. For instance, Charlemagne was beatified by a court bishop shortly after his death. He was never canonized, and his veneration has been mostly suppressed, though permission is given to celebrate Mass in his honor in the cities of Aachen and Osnabrück, however without using the title of "Blessed." A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... This article discusses the Mass as part of Christian liturgy, in particular the form it has taken in the Latin rite of the Catholic Church. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... Osnabrück is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany, some 80 km NNE of Dortmund, 45 km NE of Münster, and some 100 km due west of Hanover. ...


Beatification primarily differs from canonization in this: that the former implies (1) a locally restricted, not a universal, permission to venerate, which is (2) a mere permission, and no precept, while canonization implies a universal precept. That is to say, beatification allows the public veneration of a person as having entered Heaven, while canonization commands it. Beatification is considered to be a step towards being declared a saint, usually following the step of being declared venerable and preceding the step of canonization as a saint. Unlike canonization, most theologians do not consider the declaration of beatitude to be an infallible statement of the Church. A Stained Glass image of Venerable Father Samuel Mazzuchelli in St. ... Canonization is the process of declaring someone a saint and involves proving that a candidate has lived in such a way that he or she qualifies for this. ...


Since the Canon law reform of 1983, one miracle must be proven to have taken place through the intercession of the person to be beatified, though this requirement is waived for those who died a martyr. More about the process can be found in the article on canonization. Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... Canonization is the process of declaring someone a saint and involves proving that a candidate has lived in such a way that he or she qualifies for this. ...


A person who is beatified is given the title "Blessed." The feast day, however, is not universal, but is celebrated only in regions where the Blessed receives particular veneration. For instance, Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha is honored in the United States of America and Canada. The Blessed may also be honored in a particular religious order. For instance, veneration of John Duns Scotus is found in the diocese of Cologne, Germany and among the Franciscans, among other places. The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... Statue of Kateri Tekakwitha in front of Cathedral of St. ... John Duns Scotus (c. ... The article about perfume can be found at Eau de Cologne. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ...


Pope John Paul II (18 May 19202 April 2005) markedly changed previous Catholic practice regarding beatification. By October 2004 he had beatified 1,340 people, more than the sum of all of his predecessors since Pope Sixtus V (d. 1590), who established a beatification procedure similar to that used today. Pope Benedict XVI removed the restriction which had previously required beatification rites to be held in the Vatican, so that they can now be held in the location where the subject lived. Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), (Italian: Giovanni Paolo II), born   [] (May 18, 1920, Wadowice, Poland – April 2, 2005, Vatican City) reigned as Pope of the Roman... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Events Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher... Sixtus V, born Felice Peretti (December 13, 1521 -– August 27, 1590) was pope from 1585 to 1590. ... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ...

Stages of Canonization in the Roman Catholic Church
  Servant of God   →   Venerable   →   Blessed   →   Saint  

Canonization is the process of declaring someone a saint and involves proving that a candidate has lived in such a way that he or she qualifies for this. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Servant of God is the title given to a person of the Roman Catholic Church upon whom a pope has opened a cause of sainthood. ... A Stained Glass image of Venerable Father Samuel Mazzuchelli in St. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are usually depicted as having halos. ...

References

  • The Process of Becoming a Saint - article explaining the history of the process of becoming a saint at the Catholic Herald.
This article incorporates text from the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913.

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia, also referred to today as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by The Encyclopedia Press. ...

External link

  • List of all Blesseds in the Catholic Church by Giga-Catholic Information

  Results from FactBites:
 
BIGpedia - Beatification - Encyclopedia and Dictionary Online (518 words)
In Catholicism, beatification (from Latin beatus, blessed, via Greek μακαριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead person's accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in their name (intercession of saints).
Beatification primarily differs from canonization in this: that the former implies (1) a locally restricted, not a universal, permission to venerate, which is (2) a mere permission, and no precept, while canonization implies a universal precept.
Beatification is considered to be a step towards being declared a saint, usually following the step of being declared venerable and preceding the step of canonisation as a saint.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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