FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Beat music

Beat, also known as Merseybeat (for bands from Liverpool), Brumbeat (for bands from Birmingham) etc., is a pop music genre that evolved in the UK in the early 1960s. Beat groups characteristically had simple guitar-dominated line-ups, with vocal harmonies and catchy tunes. Beat music has little to do with the Beat generation literary movement of the 1950s, and more to do with driving rhythms, which the bands had adopted from their R&B/soul influences. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... For the TV program please see Merseybeat Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... For the TV program please see Merseybeat Merseybeat, sometimes referred to as Merseysound, was a style of music popular during the 1960s. ... Brum Beat is the name of a magazine about the music within Birmingham, United Kingdom. ... In music, a band is a company of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of or improvising a musical arrangement on different musical instruments. ... Birmingham (pron. ... For popular forms of music in general, see Popular music. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... The human voice consists of sound made by a human using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying and screaming. ... This article is about musical harmony. ... The Beat Generation was a group of American writers who came to prominence in the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ...


In 1964, a British Invasion of acts led by The Beatles swept across the Atlantic Ocean and stormed the charts in North America, but most acts did not progress into the later Psychedelic era or 'rock' decade of the 1970s. For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... // A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ...


See also

Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that enjoyed its original period of wide success in the United States and Canada, from 1963 to 1967. ...

Notable acts


  Results from FactBites:
 
Beat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (406 words)
In physics and sound, a beat is the oscillation between zero intensity and full intensity that occurs when two frequencies (which are not harmonically related) are added together, caused by alternating constructive and destructive interference of the pressure waves.
beat in music is a pulse of sound that marks the rhythm.
Beat is also then the meter, rhythm, riddim, or groove of a piece and may indicate solely the bass and snare drum rhythm parts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m