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Encyclopedia > Beast Wars
Beast Wars: Transformers

Beast Wars title card
Genre Animated Science Fiction
Starring Scott McNeil
Composer(s) Robert Buckley
Country of origin United States
Canada
Language(s) English
No. of seasons 3
No. of episodes 52 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s) Christopher J. Brough
Stéphane Reichel
Steven DeNure
Producer(s) Jonathan Goodwill
Running time 30 minutes (with commercials)
Broadcast
Original channel Syndication (1996-1998)
Cartoon Network (1998-1999) YTV
Picture format 480i (SDTV)
Original run September 16, 1996March 7, 1999
Chronology
Followed by Beast Machines
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Beast Wars: Transformers (Beasties on YTV) was a Transformers toyline released by Hasbro between 1995 and 1999. The toys spawned a full-CG animated series set in the "original" Transformers universe, produced by Mainframe Entertainment of Canada. The series debuted in 1996, as a sequel to the original Transformers cartoon series (which was later rebooted by various limited comic book stories from several companies including Dreamwave comics and IDW.) took a screenshot from DVD File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For the journal by ACM SIGGRAPH, see Computer Graphics (Publication). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Scott McNeil (born September 15, 1962 in Brisbane, Australia), is a voice actor. ... Robert Buckley, cnsultant to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum started in 1985 Collecting information, artifacts, uniforms, documents and video interviews of 180 survivors of that period. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This is a list of episodes from the animated television series Beast Wars: Transformers. ... In broadcasting, syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast radio shows and television shows to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... Cartoon Network (commonly referred to as CN) is a cable television network created by Turner Broadcasting which primarily shows animated programming. ... YTV is a TLA that may stand for: Finnish for the term Helsinki Metropolitan Area. ... 480i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... ... // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... Beast Machines was an animated television series produced by Mainframe Entertainment that was a direct sequel to Beast Wars and is the final television series to take place within the continuity of the original Transformers series. ... YTV is a Canadian cable television specialty channel aimed at youth, available nationwide through cable and satellite television. ... Various Transformers toys. ... Hasbro (NYSE: HAS) is an American toy and game company. ... For the journal by ACM SIGGRAPH, see Computer Graphics (Publication). ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Mainframe Entertainment is a Canadian computer animation and design company based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and Los Angeles, California, USA. It produces childrens computer animation TV series. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Dreamwave Productions is a Canadian art design studio and comic book publisher, best known for their multiple Transformers comic book series. ... IDW Publishing (a division of Idea and Design Works) is an American comic book company. ...


The name "Beast Wars" was not well received by the Canadian youth station (and co-producer) YTV, "war" being the offending word. The show was renamed "Beasties" for the YTV broadcasts. The opening song has the name "Beasties" chanted instead of "Beast Wars". YTV is a Canadian cable television specialty channel aimed at youth, available nationwide through cable and satellite television. ...


The story editors for the Beast Wars TV series were Bob Forward and Larry DiTillio. All three seasons are currently available on DVD in the USA and other Region 1 territories. In Australia, to coincide with the show's tenth anniversary in 2006, Madman Entertainment released all three seasons in Region 4 format. These boxsets are loaded with 'world exclusive' special features, including commentaries and interviews with the voice talent. A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Robert Lull Forward commonly known as Robert L. Forward (August 15, 1932 - September 21, 2002) was a United States physicist and science fiction writer. ... Lawrence G. Larry DiTillio is an American film and TV series writer. ... Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ... Madman Entertainment is an Australian company that specialises in the distribution of Japanese anime and manga to Australia and New Zealand. ...


The Production Designer for the show, Clyde Klotz, won an Emmy for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Animation in 1997 for his work on Beast Wars, making the series an Emmy award winning show. An Emmy Award. ...

Contents

Setting and plot

The series begins with two groups of robots from the planet 'Cybertron' who crash-land their ships, the Axalon and the transwarp-equipped Darkside, on a mysterious planet after plunging from a time/space phenomenon created by the transwarp device during their battle in space. It is learned that the Axalon's mission was exploration, while the Darkside was lead by Megatron and his forces who, with the aid of the stolen transwarp drive and artifacts known as the Golden Disks, had gone rogue as a splinter group of Predacon's on a hunt for powerful crystals, known as Energon, to be used in a ploy for power and dominance. Optimus Primal was the leader of the Maximal team stranded on what is later discovered to be Ancient Earth and Megatron was the leader of the Predacons team. (The factions themselves were ruled by the Maximal Elders and Tripredacus Council respectively). The conflict between the two teams of Transformers was deemed "The Beast Wars". ASIMO, a humanoid robot manufactured by Honda. ... Cybertron from the original cartoon series Cybertron is the home world of the Autobots and Decepticons in the assorted stories in the fictional Transformers universes. ... Beast Wars The Axalon (foreground) and Darkside (background) before crashing on prehistoric Earth. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Energon refers to a power source in the fictional Transformers universe. ... Optimus Primal (Convoy, later Beast Convoy to differentiate him from the original Convoy, Blackjack in some European markets) is a fictional character from the Transformers toyline, and the leader of the Maximal forces and the main protagonist in the Beast Wars television series. ... Megatron is a fictional character, and the main antagonist, from the Beast Wars and Beast Machines animated series and toy lines, part of the Transformers multiverse. ... Beast Wars: Transformers: The Tripredacus Council The Tripredacus Council serves as the ruling body of the Predacon Alliance in this time. ...


The two main factions of robot Transformers are descendants of the two main factions in the original cartoon series: the Maximals are the descendants of the Autobots and the Predacons are the descendants of the Decepticons. The names were intended to stem from the terms Mammal and Predator but were not necessarily consistent with the alternate forms of the Transformers. The planet they land on is soon found to be rich in deposits of raw Energon, to the point that it proves to be poisonous to their robot forms, necessitating the need for acquiring alternate forms to take on until their robot forms are truly needed, such as in times of combat. This process works by first conducting a scan of the immediate area for a beast form to acquire, as organic tissue is immune to the the deleterious effect of the energon fields. Though the planet is foreign to both teams of Transformers, the beast forms they discover and adopt are recognizable animals that include a gorilla, a cheetah, a rhino, a rat, dinosaurs, arachnids and insects. Maximals are a faction in the Transformers toyline by Hasbro and the accompanying animated television series Beast Wars. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the evil factions of Beast Wars and Transformers: Robots in Disguise known as Predacons and the Armada character of the same name. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in female mammary glands and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex region in... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ...


Before crashing, the Axalon deployed it's cargo of “stasis pods” containing Maximal "Proto-Forms," Transformer robots with vulnerable and undeveloped physical forms, which were left to orbit the planet as an alternative to possible destruction in the initial crash landing. Throughout the series, stasis pods would continue to lose altitude and crash land on the planet, and the Maximals and Predacons would race and fight to acquire them- in the case of acquisiton by Megatron's forces, a Proto-Form would be reprogrammed to become a Predacon, as was the case with Black Arachnia and Inferno for example. The stasis pods were used as a plot device to introduce new characters. In Beast Machines, the process during which Autobots and Decepticons became Maximals and Predacons is respectively referred to as the "The Great Upgrade". A plot device is a person or an object introduced to a story to affect or advance the plot. ... Beast Machines was an animated television series produced by Mainframe Entertainment that was a direct sequel to Beast Wars and is the final television series to take place within the continuity of the original Transformers series. ...

Megatron, as he appeared pre-Beast Wars in Dreamwave comics, stealing the Golden Disk (note that is the incorrect disk, as he is seen holding the Alien Disk).

As the series went on, Megatron's schemes became more and more multi-faceted. After the alarming discovery that the planet they landed on was Ancient Earth, Megatron intended to win the Beast Wars and rule the Universe by destroying the early civilization of humans that would eventually evolve after milions of years into homo sapiens who, in the year 1984, would assisst the awakened Autobots in the defeat of the Decepticons. He would also seek to to reach the previously-crashed Autobot spaceship the Ark that contained the Autobots who would awaken in 1984 following the eruption of the volcano it landed in. His goal was to comandeer the Ark and kill the dormant, original Optimus Prime, Optimus Primal's ascendant. By doing this, time would be altered and the universe would be changed as a result of the compromised timeline. The latter plot was developed following the discovery of a message made by the original Megatron for any Decepticon's who would uncover it within the Golden Disks. The Predacon Megatron would successfully infiltrate the Ark and destroy the original Optimus, but Optimus Primal took the spark of Prime into his own body in order to protect it (which transformed his body into the Optimal Optimus form) while Rhinox and the other Maximals performed vital repairs on Optimus Prime's body. When the repairs were complete, the timeline was restored to its original state. Image File history File linksMetadata Csmegatronii3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Csmegatronii3. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed. ... Rhinox is the name of several fictional characters from various Transformers Universes. ...


Many of the plots involved interaction with artifacts from an unknown alien source. These artifacts were related to a great source of power. Activating an alien beacon destroyed what was originally thought to be Earth's second moon but was revealed be a massive alien transmitter. This sent a signal to the aliens. The energy pulse was so strong that it affected the transformers on the surface of the planet, which lead to deaths of some characters and the re-configuration of others into Transmetals, while the rest were left unchanged. Transmetal Optimus Primal Transmetal Megatron Transmetals are a subgroup of Beast Wars in the fictional Transformers Universe, featuring toys with mechanical animal modes and techno-organic robot modes. ...


Beast Wars was the first Transformers series to include deaths in the television episodes (the original 80s series continuity had several characters die in the theatrical movie, but no characters died in the series itself). The most memorable death was that of the character Dinobot in Code of Hero. Also of note is the character Waspinator, who was blown to pieces or otherwise dismantled in almost every episode of the series, but never officially "died." Even in the sequel series Beast Machines, Waspinator survived, albeit in a new body and identity, as Thrust. Transformers: The Movie is a 1986 feature film version of the popular television series Transformers based on the line of toys by Hasbro. ... Dinobot is a Transformer from the fictional Beast Wars Transformers universe. ... List of Beast Wars episodes Code of Hero was the 35th episode of Beast Wars, which aired on March 9, 1998. ... Waspinator is the name of a fictional character from the various Transformers universes. ... Beast Machines was an animated television series produced by Mainframe Entertainment that was a direct sequel to Beast Wars and is the final television series to take place within the continuity of the original Transformers series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


History and development

Early Beast Wars toy tech spec cards painted a picture of the Transformers taking on giant-sized forms in the present era (similar to the '80s series it was based upon). However, when Forward and DiTillio began writing the show, they instead chose a considerably earlier setting; this would later be revealed to be Earth’s prehistoric past, long after the original Transformers ship The Ark crash-landed inside a volcano. Larry DiTillio revealed that the decision to make Earth the planet was not made until the end of the first season. They gave the planet two satellites and decided that they would destroy one moon if the planet was indeed to be Earth. The Ark is an Autobot spacecraft in the fictional Transformers Universe. ... For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ...


Originally, the series was going to be set in the present, with certain characters from the original cartoon series reborn in new bodies. This was very much evident in the Tech Specs of the first line of toys. The writers of the series, however, knew next to nothing about the original series at first, and since they were given free reign to do what they wanted with a series whose purpose was to promote what was, at the time, a dying franchise, they rewrote the premise so that it had apparently no connection to the original series outside of a few recycled names. When Bob Forward and Larry Ditillio discovered an online Transformers chat forum and learned more about the original series however, they began to work in elements from it, placing the series in the same universe.


Early concepts for the series show that the original faction leaders (Primal and Megatron) were in fact going to be re-imaginations of the original 'series faction leaders, Optimus Prime and Megatron (later Galvatron), but the series itself shows that they are indeed separate characters. (Both Primal and Megatron come face-to-face with the currently-deactivated forms of their ancestors inside the Ark at different points.) The idea of both faction leaders being the original characters was probably abandoned when the idea of the series taking place in modern times was dropped.


The show was originally going to feature a much larger cast of characters, but limitations on CGI at the time meant that the animators had to shorten the cast to five members on both sides, adding new characters sparingly. Bob Forward has credited this as being part of the reason why the show was so successful, because a smaller cast meant he could focus on character development and personality for every character, as opposed to the ungainly task of writing for an entire army's worth of characters.


Also, instead of Tigatron, the toy-only character Wolfang was supposed to be in the show, but was replaced at the last moment to conserve money, as Tigatron was a repaint of Cheetor in the toy line, and thus would be easy to tweak the existing Cheetor CGI figure to look like the white tiger Maximal. This reuse of character CGI figures to introduce new characters is a fairly common money-saving tactic for most CGI-based television shows, and was used in Beast Wars to make Blackarachnia (a slight remodel and remap of Tarantulas) and Ravage whose head was a repainted version of Tigatron's beast mode head, mounted on a robot body which was a remodel of Transmetal Cheetor's robot mode body. Wolfang is a fictional character in the various Transformers universes. ... Cheetor is the name of several fictional characters from the Transformers toyline. ...


Susan Blu, who provided the voice of Arcee in the original Transformers series, was the voice director for the Beast Wars series, as well as the voice of Transmutate in the episode of the same name. Susan Blu is a voice actress in various Transformers series. ... Transmutate promo art from Hasbro. ...


Initially, Waspinator, not Terrorsaur, was to die at the beginning of Season Two. Because people enjoyed Waspinator as comic relief for the series, the creators decided to kill off Terrorsaur instead. Waspinator went on to be the only Predacon to survive both Beast Wars and Beast Machines (not counting Blackarachnia, who defected in season three of Beast Wars).


The third season of the TV show was originally supposed to include an episode called "Dark Glass", written by Christy Marx. The script of the episode depicted an encounter between Rattrap and the Dinobot Clone, where Rattrap finds that the datatracks of the original Dinobot in the ship's computer, and goes on a suicide mission to install it into the transmetal II clone in a desperate bid to bring his old friend/foe back. However, the script was seen as "too dark" for little children to watch, and so the episode was never produced. A considerably lighter and more jocular episode called "Go with the Flow" was created in its place. Transcripts of the episode survived, however, and it is now considered part of the Beast Wars continuity, mainly for its explanation on how the Dinobot Clone regained the original's personality after Rampage was destroyed at the end of Season Three. This was also made in a fancomic.[1] Christy Marx (born c. ...


Characters

This is a list of characters from the animated television series Beast Wars: Transformers. ...

Episodes and media releases

This is a list of episodes from the animated television series Beast Wars: Transformers. ...

Reception

While the toy line was lauded for its innovative joint construction and the show mostly liked by fans, some more extreme Transformers purists decried the entire series as a mistake, having gone as far as to angrily post slogans like "TRUKK NOT MUNKY" (infamously misspelled) on the internet to show their resentment over the use of animals instead of vehicles for the line's alternate forms. This quickly died out, especially in light of the fact that some Transformers from the original series (such as the Dinobots and Insecticons) had beast-like modes. Overall, Beast Wars was well-received and is often praised for its mature tone and darker storylines, in addition to its character development. The Dinobots are a team of characters in the fictional Transformers Universe. ... Insecticons is the name given to a sub-group of fictional characters in the Transformers Universes, referred to as Insectrons in the Japanese version. ...


Beast Machines

Main article: Beast Machines

Beast Wars was followed up by Beast Machines, a new series with a new creative team in charge of the cartoon. As a sequel, it was not initially well received among some fans mostly due to the surviving Maximals and Predacons being out-of-character to a variable, and others to a considerable, degree. Others did not find its techno-organic Cybertron concept to be agreeable, as the planet was always referred to previously as never having organic life. However, in more recent years, it has been held in somewhat higher regard, especially compared to the perceived poor quality of the newer and Japanese produced series that are unconnected to the original core universe. However, the higher regard is not considered universal amongst fans and whether or not Beast Machines was a worthy successor to Beast Wars is still considered a matter of controversy. Beast Machines was an animated television series produced by Mainframe Entertainment that was a direct sequel to Beast Wars and is the final television series to take place within the continuity of the original Transformers series. ... In the fiction, especially in the Marvel Comics universe and Beast Machines, techno-organic material is a material with properties and abilities of both organic and technological (mechanical and information-processing) material. ...


Japanese treatment

The Japanese series Beast Wars II and Beast Wars Neo were created to fill the gap while the second and third seasons of Beast Wars were being translated into Japanese (called Beast Wars: Metals). The characters originate from the future that the Beast Wars teams left, but the events of the series take place in the far future. The series are noted primarily for the return of Unicron, but more negatively, for their childish, comedic nature, as the Transformers franchise is aimed at a very young age group in Japan in comparison to the United States. Beast Wars II spawned a theatrical movie. The Beast Wars Neo toyline was created to cater to the Japanese market. Whereas the cybernetic transmetal Beast Wars Transformers sold well in Western markets, Japanese fans preferred more realistic looking beast modes, thus Beast Wars Metals was not as successful with Japanese fans. The second and thirds season of Beast Wars and its toy line only lasted a few months before being quickly replaced by Transformers: Car Robots in the following new year, in which several unused Transmetal 2 molds were used as Destrongers (Predacons). Beast Wars II: Super Life-form Transformer ) is the 1998 Japanese Transformers television animated series, movie and toyline. ... Beast Wars Neo is the 1999 Japanese Transformers television animated series and toyline and is a direct sequel to Beast Wars II. Both animated series were created because of the time taken to dub and air new seasons of Beast Wars in Japan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Comic books

While the Beast Wars and Beast Machines series officially exist as the future of the original cartoon series, it also incorporated bits and pieces of the Marvel comics as well, while introducing new elements into the Transformer mythos, such as sparks and protoforms (however, it should be noted that beyond use of the comic-only term, "The Ark", and the comic book entity, Primus, all of the show's references are based on the original cartoon). This would be carried on into the Dreamwave comics, which seemed to integrate elements from both lines while working towards maintaining continuity with Beast Wars. Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... The Ark after it crashed to Earth The Ark is an Autobot spacecraft in the fictional Transformers Universe. ... Primus is the benevolent godlike entity in the fictional Transformers comic universe who fought against the Chaos-Bringer Unicron. ...


BotCon comics

In the BotCon comics, two particular Beast Wars storylines are tapped.


In the Point Omega storyline, several events lead up to a tremendous battle against Shokaract, a Predacon fueled by the Dark Essence of Unicron himself. This also serves as an introduction for Apelinq, and the only appearances of Windrazor, Sandstorm, Antagony, and Cataclysm. Shokaract is a character from the Transformers toy line and comic series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Apelinq is a character from the Transformers toy series and comic books. ... Windrazor is the name of several fictional characters in the Transformers universes. ...


In the Primeval Dawn story, Tarantulas comes back from the dead alongside Ravage, Spittor, Iguanus and Razorclaw to complete the mission he set out to do, while the Vok create Primal Prime to stand in his way; Primal Prime teams up with Airazor, Tigatron and Ramulus, who have come back from the dead as well. Primal Prime is a fictional character from the Transformers toy and story lines. ...


Dreamwave Productions

Dreamwave Productions released a Summer Special which contained a Beast Wars story. It introduced three new characters, Optimus Minor, Bonecrusher and Wolfang. The comic had a survey as to whether Dreamwave's new comic would be Robots In Disguise or Beast Wars. Beast Wars won. Dreamwave Productions is a Canadian art design studio and comic book publisher, best known for their multiple Transformers comic book series. ... Optimus Minor is the name of a fictional character from the Transformers toyline that appeared in the Beast Wars: The Gathering. ... Bonecrusher is the name of several fictional characters in the various Transformers universes. ... Wolfang is a fictional character in the various Transformers universes. ...


Dreamwave Productions had plans to release a Beast Wars comic in early 2005, which would have been done by the War Within creative team of Simon Furman and Don Figueroa. Brad Mick and Adam Patyk were originally planned to write the series until they left Dreamwave after not being paid for several projects. However, although some cover art did appear on the internet, Dreamwave entered bankruptcy before one issue could be published.
Simon Furman is a comic book writer, particularly associated with of a number of notable Transformers comics for Marvel UK, Marvel US, Dreamwave, and most recently, IDW. He also wrote the final episode of the Beast Wars: Transformers cartoon, the Transformers Ultimate Fan Guide, and several convention exclusive comics and... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


IDW Publishing

Main article: Beast Wars: The Gathering
Beast Wars Magmatron vs. Grimlock from IDW.

After Dreamwave filed for bankruptcy in January 2005, the license for all Transformers comics, including Beast Wars were picked up by IDW Publishing, and was released in early 2006 as a four-issue miniseries. The series was written by Simon Furman and drawn by Don Figueroa. The Beast Wars comic takes place parallel to the third season of Beast Wars and introduced characters who were not shown in the original series such as Magmatron, Razorbeast and Injector. Other characters who made an appearance are Grimlock in his Beast Wars body (a recolored Dinobot toy) and Ravage in his Transmetal II "Tripredacus Agent" incarnation. Image File history File linksMetadata Magmatron-grimlock. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Magmatron-grimlock. ... Beast Wars Magmatron vs. ... Grimlock is the name of three fictional characters in the Transformers universes. ... IDW Publishing (a division of Idea and Design Works) is an American comic book company. ... Simon Furman is a comic book writer, particularly associated with of a number of notable Transformers comics for Marvel UK, Marvel US, Dreamwave, and most recently, IDW. He also wrote the final episode of the Beast Wars: Transformers cartoon, the Transformers Ultimate Fan Guide, and several convention exclusive comics and... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Beast Wars Magmatron vs. ... Razorbeast is the name of a fictional character from the Transformers toyline that appeared in the Beast Wars: The Gathering. ... Grimlock is the name of three fictional characters in the Transformers universes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Taking place around the events of the season three episode Deep Metal (the Predacons are just installing Sentinel), the comic focused on Magmatron, sent by the Tripredacus Council to capture Megatron after Ravage's failure. However, Magmatron had his own agenda - to create his own army from the stasis pods the Axalon had ejected in the pilot episode. His scheme was partially thwarted by the Maximal double-agent Razorbeast, who ensured the shell program used reconfigured many of the protoforms as Maximals rather than Predacons. The two sides would clash in an attempt to stop Magmatron from returning to Cybertron with a captured Megatron, with some unexpected aid from Grimlock ensuring Magmatron was sent back to Cybertron empty handed. However, Razorbeast's Maximals and many Predacons (led by Ravage, resurrected in a transmetal II body) were left on Earth, opening the way for future series. Beast Wars: Transformers: The Tripredacus Council The Tripredacus Council serves as the ruling body of the Predacon Alliance in this time. ...


The series is important in that it wraps up many of the loose ends that the show did not address – most importantly, what happened to the various protoforms that the Maximals jettisoned. Also the presence of both Lio Convoy and Big Convoy in flashback sequences implies that the Japanese Beast Wars II and Beast Wars Neo take place in the same continuity. Beast Wars Second In the japanese television series Beast Wars Second Lio Convoy is the name of the leader of the Cybertrons (Maximals in the US). ... // In the Japanese television series Beast Wars Neo, Big Convoy (also known as Magna Prime) is the name of the leader of the Cybertrons. ...


IDW editor-in-chief Chris Ryall recently confirmed the second Beast Wars series, titled The Ascending, as well as a series of character profile books, will be due in August.[2][3]


Video games

There have been two Beast Wars video games, both for the PlayStation and Nintendo 64 home systems, though one (the first one) was released for the PC, as well. The first, based on the first season of the show, is a third person shooter in which you can control either the Maximals or the Predacons in a series of missions to undermine the other faction's attempts at gaining enough resources to win the war between them and escape the planet. This one was released in 1998 by Hasbro Interactive. The other, Transformers: Beast Wars Transmetals, is a Fighting Vipers-style fighting game based on the second season and was also released by Hasbro Interactive, though only the PlayStation version; the Nintendo 64 version was released by bam! Entertainment. Neither of these games did well, commercially, and were overall panned by critics and fans alike, although the second game was memorable for having most of the voice actors from the show itself reprise their roles as the characters. The PC version of the first game also has a multiplayer feature (removed from the console releases) that allowed up to 8 players to play over LAN, and had its own play rooms in the MSN Gaming Zone, though it's been subsequently removed. A third game was in the works for the PlayStation 2, but was scrapped in pre-production, without any official word as to why, or how far the project was before the plug was pulled.[4] The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... This section needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A third-person shooter is a computer game in 3-D where the camera view is outside and usually behind the main player character. ... Hasbro Interactive was a video game production and publishing subsidiary of Hasbro, the game and toy giant. ... Fighting Vipers is a 3D fighting game developed by Sega-AM2. ... Lan can stand for several things: A local area network Lan (airline) formerly LanChile Lan Peru Län, a kind of administrative division used in Sweden Lan Mandragoran, a fictional character in the Wheel of Time fantasy series by Robert Jordan. ... The MSN Gaming Zone was once a popular website that hosted online gameplay, much akin to the GameSpy arcade of today. ... The PlayStation 2 , abbreviated PS2) is Sonys second video game console, the successor to the PlayStation and the predecessor to the PlayStation 3. ... Pre-production is the process of preparing all the elements involved in a film, play, or other performance. ...


References to Transformers and other media

Beast Wars is known for its frequent fan references. Transformers fan and proprietor of www.bwtf.com Ben Yee had been called on many times to provide insight into the Transformers mythos to Mainframe so they could properly incorporate content from the original series into the show. As thanks for his help, Ben Yee is given a commendation within an episode of the show as an in-joke. When Rhinox was reprogrammed as a Predacon, he sabotaged various aspects of the base, and even Waspinator's personality. When Blackarachnia referred to him as "wacko", Waspinator replied "Wacko? No, Wonko! Wonko the Sane!" before saluting the screen. This is a reference to a character from Douglas Adams' So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, and was the screen name of Ben Yee at the time. In addition to Ben Yee, other fan references were spread throughout the series. Notable fan references include: Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (1984, ISBN 0-345-39183-7) is the fourth book of the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy series written by Douglas Adams. ... For pseudonyms used for film appearances, see stage name For pseudonyms used for internet communications and BBSs, see screenname The Screen Name service (also ScreenName) is a common password system that is required to use any services or programs from AOL, AIM, Compuserve, or Netscape This is a disambiguation page...

  • Episode 13 Dark Design - After Cheetor shoots him, Waspinator does a nose-dive into a platform. While shutting down he says "More than meets the eye." which is part of the Transformers slogan.
  • Episode 24 Before The Storm - "Code A.T.T.", spoken by Megatron, in reference to fan forum alt.toys.transformers, and "...it is beyond imagination!", again spoken by Megatron, in reference to James Hooks' website "Beyond Imagination", which at the time included interviews with the writers and spoilers for upcoming episodes, and was itself a reference to the tagline of The Transformers: The Movie - "Beyond Good, Beyond Evil, Beyond Your Wildest Imagination."
  • Episode 35 Code of Hero - "Got a blue plate sighting in Tengu Sector", spoken by Cheetor, in reference to fan Tengu.
  • Episode 37 The Agenda Part One - "Rampage, position yourself in Subsector Hooks", spoken by Megatron, another reference to Hooks.
  • Episode 39 The Agenda Part Three - At the beginning of the episode, Rattrap rides a large missile down to ground rodeo-style, with a yell of "yee-haw!". This is a reference to the ending of Dr. Strangelove.
  • Episode 39 The Agenda Part Three - Referring to the Ark, Optimus Primal remarks on it's design by saying: "Die-cast construction - it's a lost art." This is a reference to how the original Transformers toys used die-cast metal in their construction, but this practice had ceased by Beast Wars, hence it being a "lost art."
  • Episode 44 Feral Scream Part One - "Sector Tallories", spoken by Optimus Primal, in reference to fan Tallories.
  • Episode 47 Go with the Flow - "Quarry detected - Grid Joona", in reference to a Finnish Transformers fan. However, the name is mispronounced as "jeu-nah", while the original Finnish pronunciation is "yaw-nah".
  • Episode 51 Nemesis Part One - "This is Optimus, encoding transmission M Sipher" in reference to the screen name of fan Greg Spelak.
  • Episode 51 Nemesis Part One - "Like you had no time for Starbase Rugby? You had friends there, as I recall... Tasty ones too!" Rampage mentions Starbase Rugby; the name reversed is Rugby's Starbase, a small internet store that had taken many TF toys and created a somewhat official TF continuity. This is also where the name Omicron comes from.
  • Episode 52 Nemesis Part Two - "Targeting grid 3H, full power to weapons, Fire!" Megatron mentions 3H which was the name of the group who was in control of the BotCon convention at the time: Jon and Carl Hartman, and Glen Hallit.

While not as common, Beast Wars also makes a few entertaining pop culture references. One of them appeared in the episode "Victory" when the Axalon's engines were failing. The crash was avoided thanks to Optimus, who guided the ship to a landing position using his Prime Jets and incredible strength. To add further comic relief, the Maximals suggest that it could be "a bird" or "a plane" until they realize that it is Optimus flying to their rescue. This is a clear reference to the DC Comics hero, Superman. Strangelove redirects here. ... Display cases for upcoming Transformers at BotCon 2006 BotCon, briefly known as The Official Transformers Collectors Convention (or OTFCC), is an annual convention for Transformers fans and collectors. ... The Maximals are watching the Predacons on their new spy camera. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


At another point, Silverbolt points out Venus to Blackarachnia, saying it reminds him of her; this is a subtle reference to Venus Terzo, who provides the voice of Blackarachnia. In the show, Rattrap once referred to his vehicle form as "Knievel mode" which likens his driving form (and possibly driving skills) to the daredevil Evel Knievel. After Rattrap complains about Silverbolt's attitude, Cheetor tells him to forget it, and says: "You and I can go to the Six Lasers Over Cybertron amusement park." The name is a nod to the Six Flags amusement park chain. Robert Craig Evel Knievel, Jr. ... Six Flags (NYSE: SIX) is the worlds largest chain of amusement parks and theme parks and is headquartered in New York City. ...


Cheetor also makes a reference to American football in the episode where Rhinox was reprogrammed. When the Maximals storm the Predacon base, Cheetor says 'how about we punt your butt a hundred yards down the field?' An American football field is 100 yards long, and since the show was made in North America, it is safe to assume that 'punting' is a reference to American football (as opposed to other kinds of football). United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


In the episode Victory, when the Maximals are inspecting the deserted Darkside, Cheetor waves some of Tarantulas' legs at Dinobot. Dinobot takes them and says "Alas, poor Tarantulas. I knew him, Cheetor." This is a direct reference to the play Hamlet when Hamlet holds a skull and says "Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio." Dinobot also quoted Hamlet in Coming of the Fuzors pt. 1 when he said "to be, or not to be, that is the question" (this quote was the start of a speech referring to the Golden Disks). He goes on to reference the play again as he dies in Code of Hero, uttering Hamlet's final words, "the rest is silence." The Maximals are watching the Predacons on their new spy camera. ...


In the episode "Proving Grounds" Rattrap is seen playing video games on the Maximal computer. The games are similar to Street Fighter, with Megatron and Optimus Prime fighting (It even took the announcer's voice from Street Fighter II), and a second that is similar to Doom, with Rattrap's gun and enemies that look like Waspinator. In the episode "Power Surge", Rattrap is seen playing a game of cards against a pair of holographic hands. The cards themselves are holographic and have the Maximal logo on the back. Screenshot of Street Fighter (arcade version). ... Doom (or DOOM)[1] is a 1993 computer game by id Software that is a landmark title in the first-person shooter genre. ...


One of the most comical references appeared in "Possession", when Optimus defeated Starscream, saying "hasta la vista Starscream" referring to a similar quote from the movie, Terminator 2. Sunglasses also appeared over his eyes briefly, another reference to the Terminator movies. Possession is a first season episode of Beast Wars which first aired on February 3, 1997. ... Terminator 2: Judgment Day (commonly abbreviated T2) is a 1991 movie starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, Edward Furlong, and Robert Patrick and directed by James Cameron. ...


In one episode, Rhinox and Inferno fight each other in the style of 'Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots'. Rhinox wins causing Inferno's head to come up; Megatron shoots Rhinox and shoves Inferno's head back down. Rockem Sockem Robots Rock Em Sock Em Robots is a two-player game/toy designed by Marvin Glass and Associates and released by Marx toys in 1967. ...


After the Quantum Surge, Blackarachnia exits the Axalon and views the newly altered Earth and claims how things have changed. Then Airazor states "The more things change, the more they stay the same," a famous American proverb.


In the episode Feral Scream pt 1, when Megatron and Waspinator are creating a Transmetal II clone of Dinobot, the twisted experiment is a parody of Frankenstein, with Waspinator rubbing his hands together anxiously, with the posture of Igor as he says "Yes, Master". Also, when the Predacons hold Depth Charge captive there is a dual reference to Warner Brothers Cartoons. When Megatron is hit by a direct charge from Transmetal II Cheetor, he is spun away in a manner reminiscent of Taz the Tasmanian Devil. He then falls off a cliff, looking up for a few seconds then falling like Wile E Coyote. This article is about the 1818 novel. ...


In 'Coming of the Fuzors pt. 1', Inferno is attacking Silverbolt and Quickstrike. When Megatron saves them by knocking Inferno out, he says 'goodbye bad cop, hello good cop'. The good cop/bad cop interrogation technique has become well-known throughout pop-culture (thanks to movies and TV shows) and the phrase 'good cop, bad cop' is a pop-culture reference in itself (and is sometimes used in reference to other situations besides interrogations).


Optimus Primal's Gorilla form and Megatron's T. Rex forms are also an homage to King Kong where the gorilla, Kong, fights a Tyrannosaurus rex. In the episode 'Beast Wars Part 2', Optimus and Megatron do fight in their beast modes. It also likely a reference to Godzilla's and King Kong's relationships in the film franchise. It has also been believed that the Predacons are based on monsters that were featured in the series. For other uses, see Godzilla (disambiguation). ... The original 1933 King Kong model. ...


In the first two episodes, Optimus frequently rode on Rhinox's back when both were in beast mode. This may have been an obscure reference to the videogame Donkey Kong Country, where Donkey Kong is able to ride a rhino called Rambi. Donkey Kong Country, released in Japan as Super Donkey Kong ), is a video game developed by Rare and Nintendo, featuring the popular arcade character, Donkey Kong. ...


In the episode Equal Measures Terrasoaur refers to Cheetor as Kit Kat.


Time is constantly referred to in terms of 'cycles' with prefixes attached to delineate units of tens or more. Megacycles are referred to in some episodes supposedly referring to one million cycles. The term "stellar cycle" is also used to refer to some number of cycles, not made known to the viewers. In 'Code of Hero', Rhinox mentions that the temporal wavefront of the transwarp explosion will reach cybertronian space in 'approximately 2.218 decacycles.' which suggests that they might use a few other metric prefixes for time that are never mentioned explicitly in the episodes. Of note, most half-hour TV shows are about 22.18 minutes long to allow time for commercials, but since there is a second episode between 'Code of Hero' and 'The Agenda (Part 1)' where the wave actually enters cybertron's space, this may be simple coincidence, or it could mean that a single decacycle is about a day long. This may be considered contradicting, because in 'Equal Measures' Optimus freely said, "That storm will hit us within the hour!" when replying to Cheetor, who offered to fix the bomb.


Beast Wars even made references to itself in certain episodes. When Rhinox was reprogrammed, Optimus said 'yesss', which was Megatron's catchphrase (this may have been a subtle play on the fact that Garry Chalk, who voiced Optimus, originally auditioned for Megatron). When Optimus wanted to fly at maximum speed, he said "maximum burn" but in 'Coming of the Fuzors Part 1', Rattrap (in vehicle mode) said "maximum rubber burn!" This also works as a pop-culture reference: burning rubber is a slang term for driving really fast, since tires are made of rubber and will melt if spun too fast (due to the friction against the road). The show was also very self-aware and referred to everyday things in more 'robotic' terms (such as 'metal violin' and 'cyber puberty' and calling male Transformers “bots” and females ones “fem-bots”).


The episode 'Master Blaster' was named after the movie 'Mad Max 3: Beyond the Thunderdome' in which there was a character named Master Blaster. He was made up of two characters: a stupid giant named 'Blaster' and intelligent dwarf who rode on his shoulders named 'Master'. Together they were called Master Blaster, and apparently the name was chosen because of Quickstrike in his giant metal control suit bearing some resemblance to Master Blaster.


Some other references made were the following: "Nobody calls me chicken!" by Rattrap, referring to Marty McFly from the Back to the Future movies, "Persistence is futile" in Season 3 "Other Victories" by Tigerhawk when he first confronted Megatron, referring to the "Resistance is futile" catchphrase used by Star Trek's Borg, and finally the often used "What's new pussycat?" regularly heard in Season 1, used at least once by Rattrap to Cheetor, is the name of a song made famous by Tom Jones.


In the episode "Possession," when waspinator is taken over by Starscream, the Predacon symbol on the side of his head turns to a Decepticon symbol. Also, when Starscream is telling the Maximals to attack the Predacon base, at the begining his leg is inside the auto gun.


At the end of "Code of Hero," when the Maximal's cremate Dinobot, Rattrap is near Rhinox but he is in his non-Transmetal form.


In the episode where Tigerhawk destroys the Pred base, when the Pred's attack Tigerhawk, Dinobot fires a green optic laser instead of his normal red laser.


Cast

English-language cast

Actor Character
Gary Chalk Optimus Primal
Richard Newman Rhinox, Vok
Ian James Corlett Cheetor, Sentinel, Maximal Computer
Scott McNeil Rattrap, Dinobot, Dinobot II, Silverbolt, Waspinator
Blu Mankuma Tigatron, Tigerhawk, Vok
Pauline Newstone Airazor
David Sobolov Depth Charge
David Kaye Megatron
Don Brown Scorponok
Alec Willows Tarantulas
Doug Parker Terrorsaur, Starscream
Venus Terzo Blackarachnia
Jim Byrnes Inferno
Colin Murdock Quickstrike
Campbell Lane Rampage
Elizabeth Carol Savenkoff Predacon Ship Computer
Lee Tockar Ravage
Susan Blu Transmutate, Una

Leslie West and Joe Lynn Turner provided the voices that said Beast Wars during episodes of the show. Gary Chalk (born 1953) is a British-born Canadian actor and voice actor. ... Richard Newmans roles in Transformers cartoons are too nummerous to count. ... Ian James Corlett (born August 29, 1962 in Vancouver) is an animation voice artist, writer, and musician. ... Scott McNeil (born September 15, 1962 in Brisbane, Australia), is a voice actor. ... Blu Mankuma is an African-American actor born in Seattle, Washington but currently living in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... David Sobolov is a voice actor. ... David Kaye (born 14 October 1964) is a Canadian voice actor. ... Donald Don Brown is one of the many Canadian voice talents operating out of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Doug Parker is a Canadian voice actor and voice director. ... Venus Terzo (born Oct. ... Jim Byrnes in the series Highlander James Thomas Byrnes was born on September 22, 1948 in St. ... Colin Murdock is a voice actor who is also known as Colin Murdoch. ... Campbell Lane is a Canadian actor who primarily does work in Vancouver. ... Lee Tockar is a Canadian voice actor who works for Ocean Studios in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Susan Blu is a voice actress in various Transformers series. ... Leslie West (born October 22, 1945) is an American rock guitarist, singer and songwriter. ... Joe Lynn Turner (JLT) born August 2, 1951 in Hackensack, New Jersey, was the singer for Fandango and two British hard rock groups: Rainbow (1980-1984; break-up) and Deep Purple (1989-1992). ...


Japanese cast

Takehito Koyasu (子安 武人 Koyasu Takehito, born May 5, 1967) in Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan is a seiyÅ« (voice actor). ... Nakamura Daiki (中村 大樹) is a seiyu who was born on December 25, 1962 in Tokyo. ... Takagi Wataru (高木 渉, born on July 25, 1966 in Chiba) is a seiyu who works for Arts Vision. ... Kappei Yamaguchi ) (real name: Mitsuo Yamaguchi )) (born May 23, 1965) is a male seiyÅ« from Fukuoka, Fukuoka, affiliated with GokÅ« and 21st Century Fox. ... Keiji Fujiwara ) (October 5, 1964 - ) is a male seiyÅ« from the Tokyo Metropolitan area who is affiliated with Air Agengy. ... Kouichi Toochika (遠近 孝一 Tōchika Kōichi, born October 20, 1971) is a seiyÅ« who was works for Haikyo. ... Tetsuya Iwanaga (岩永 哲哉 Iwanaga Tetsuya, born June 24, 1970) is a seiyÅ«. Currently, as of 2005, Iwanaga is not affiliated with any production. ... Mitsuo Iwata (岩田 光央 Iwata Mitsuo, born July 31, 1967) is a seiyÅ« who was born in Tokorozawa, Saitama. ... Kiyoyuki Yanada (梁田 清之 Yanada Kiyoyuki, born May 10, 1965) is a seiyÅ« who was born in Tokyo. ... Shigeru Chiba (千葉 繁 Chiba Shigeru, born February 4, 1954) is a veteran seiyuu (voice actor) who was born in Kumamoto. ... Nobuo Tobita ) is a veteran seiyÅ« who was born November 6, 1960 in Ibaraki. ... YÅ«ichi Nagashima (長島 雄一 Nagashima YÅ«ichi) is a seiyÅ« who was born on December 15, 1957 in Saitama. ... Ryoka Yuzuki (柚木 涼香 Yuzuki Ryōka, born January 10, 1974) is a seiyuu who was born in Anjo, Aichi, Japan. ... Shinichiro Miki ) is a seiyÅ« who was born on March 18, 1968; in the city of Tokyo. ... Nobuyuki Hiyama (檜山 修之 Hiyama Nobuyuki, born August 25, 1967) is a seiyÅ« (Japanese voice actor) born in Hatsukaichi, Hiroshima, Japan. ... Kazuki Yao (矢尾 一樹 Yao Kazuki, born June 17, 1959) is a veteran seiyÅ« who was born in Ishikawa. ... Haruna Ikezawa (池澤 春菜 Ikezawa Haruna) is a fairly recent seiyÅ«. She was born on December 15, 1975 in Tokyo, Japan [edit] Notable voice roles Hiroko Haruna and Torahamu-Chan in Tottoko Hamutaro (Hamtaro) Yoshino Shimazu in Maria-sama ga Miteru Porun in Futari wa Pretty Cure Noriko Ukai in Gravitation Athena... Chafurin , born December 4, 1961 in Saitama) is a seiyÅ« who works for Office Osawa. ... Kishino Yukimasa(岸野 幸正) is a seiyu who was born on October 21, 1955 in Tokyo. ... Jouji Yanami (八奈見乗児, Yanami Jouji), born Shigemitsu Shirato (白土繁満, Shirato Shigemitsu) on August 30, 1931 in Tokyo, is a veteran seiyuu. ... Toshiyuki Morikawa , born January 26, 1967) is a seiyÅ« born in Kanagawa, Japan. ...

References

  1. ^ 1. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  2. ^ forums.idwpublishing.com/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=87e9e0df7b91b33235216dfacd50d587;act=ST;f=21;t=3636;st=20. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  3. ^ forums.idwpublishing.com/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=87e9e0df7b91b33235216dfacd50d587;act=ST;f=21;t=3636;st=80. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  4. ^ www.tv.com/aftermath/episode/45417/trivia.html. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Beast Wars - Answers.com (8378 words)
Beast Wars (Beasties on YTV) was a Transformers toyline released by Hasbro between 1995 and 1999.
Beast Wars was the first Transformers series to include deaths in the television episodes (the original 80s series had several characters die in the theatrical movie, but no characters died in the series itself).
Beast Wars has the somewhat-dubious honor of being the first Transformers line to have a video game made of it outside of Japan, with the exceptions of 1985 and 1986 home computer games based on the original series.
Beast Wars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8305 words)
Beast Wars: Transformers (Beasties on YTV) was a Transformers toyline released by Hasbro between 1995 and 1999.
Lieutenant and a somewhat pessimistic smart-aleck whose beast mode is a rat.
His beast mode is known as a Fuzor, a combination of two animals; in Silverbolt's case, a fusion of an Eagle and a Gray Wolf.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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