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Encyclopedia > Beard
Example of a full, untrimmed beard and moustache
Example of a full, untrimmed beard and moustache

A beard is the hair that grows on a human's chin, cheeks, neck, and the area above the upper lip (the opposite is a clean-shaven face). Typically, only post-pubescent males are able to grow beards.[dubious ] When differentiating between upper and lower facial hair, a beard specifically refers to the facial hair on the lower part of a man's chin (excluding the moustache, which refers to hair above the upper lip and around it). The study of beards is called pogonology. Bearded is a bi-monthly music magazine based in Birmingham, England that distributes for free nationwide through a distribution network of independent record shops, alternative music venues and other hubs of alternative culture. ... wheeler File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... wheeler File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the body feature. ... This article is about modern humans. ... This article is about the part of the face. ... A man with a clean-shaven face A clean-shaven beard is one that has been totally removed, usually by shaving or other more radical means of depilation. ... Puberty refers to the process of physical changes by which a childs body becomes an adult body capable of reproduction. ... Joseph Stalin, one of the most famous historical figures with a moustache For the Swedish heavy metal band, see Mustasch. ...


In the course of history, men with facial hair have been ascribed various attributes such as wisdom, sexual virility, or high social status; and, conversely, filthiness, crudeness, or an eccentric disposition, such as in the case of a tramp, hobo or vagrant. In many cultures beards are associated with nature and outdoorsmen. One kind of modern beard. ... For the apocryphal book of the Bible, see Book of Wisdom. ... Human sexuality is the expression of sexual feelings. ... Virility is part of the traditional idealized male gender role. ... Social status is the honor or prestige attached to ones position in society (ones social position). ... For other uses, see Tramp (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Vagrancy is a crime in some European countries, but most of these laws have been abandoned. ...

Contents

History

Ancient and classical world

Pre-classical civilizations

The highest ranking Ancient Egyptians grew hair on their chins which was often dyed or hennaed (reddish brown) and sometimes plaited with interwoven gold thread. A metal false beard, or postiche, which was a sign of sovereignty, was worn by queens as well as kings. This was held in place by a ribbon tied over the head and attached to a gold chin strap, a fashion existing from about 3000 to 1580 BC. The pyramids are among the most recognizable symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt. ... -1... (31st century BC - 30th century BC - 29th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2925 - 2776 BC - First Dynasty wars in Egypt 2900 BC - Beginning of the Early Dynastic Period I in Mesopotamia. ... (Redirected from 1580 BC) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1630s BC 1620s BC 1610s BC 1600s BC 1590s BC - 1580s BC - 1570s BC 1560s BC 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC Events and Trends Significant People Categories: 1580s BC ...


Mesopotamian civilizations (Assyrian, Babylonian, Chaldean, Median and ancient Persian) devoted great care to oiling and dressing their beards, using tongs and curling irons to create elaborate ringlets and tiered patterns. Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ...


In ancient India, the beard was allowed to grow long, a symbol of dignity and of wisdom (cf. sadhu). The nations in the east generally treated their beards with great care and veneration, and the punishment for licentiousness and adultery was to have the beard of the offending parties publicly cut off. They had such a sacred regard for the preservation of their beards that a man might pledge it for the payment of a debt. In Hinduism, sadhu is a common term for an ascetic or practitioner of yoga (yogi) who has given up pursuit of the first three Hindu goals of life: kama (pleasure), artha (wealth and power) and even dharma (duty). ...


The Persians were fond of long beards. In Olearius' Travels, a King of Persia commands his steward's head to be cut off, and on its being brought to him, remarks, "what a pity it was, that a man possessing such fine mustachios, should have been executed," but he adds, "Ah! it was your own fault." The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Adam Olearius (born Adam Oehlschlaeger) (1603–1671), German scholar, mathematician, geographer and librarian. ...


Ancient Greece

A coin depicting a cleanly-shaven Alexander the Great.
A coin depicting a cleanly-shaven Alexander the Great.

The ancient Greeks regarded the beard as a badge of virility which it was a disgrace to be without; and in the Homeric time it had even a sanctity as among the Jews, so that a common form of entreaty was to touch the beard of the person addressed. It was only shaven as a sign of mourning, though in this case it was instead often left untrimmed. A smooth face was regarded as a sign of effeminacy.[1] The Spartans punished cowards by shaving off a portion of their beards. From the earliest times, however, the shaving of the upper lip was not uncommon. Grecian beards were also frequently curled with tongs. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 621 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (717 × 692 pixel, file size: 192 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 621 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (717 × 692 pixel, file size: 192 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Ancient Greece is the term used to describe the Greek_speaking world in ancient times. ... Virility is part of the traditional idealized male gender role. ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... The noun Greek refers to: Synonymous to Grecian; a native or inhabitant of Greece, or a person of Greek descent. ...


Ancient Macedonia

In the time of Alexander the Great the custom of smooth shaving was introduced.[2] Reportedly, Alexander ordered his soldiers to be clean shaven, fearing that their beards would serve as handles for their enemies to grab and to hold the soldier as he was killed. The practice of shaving spread from the Macedonians, whose kings are represented on coins, etc. with smooth faces, throughout the whole Greek world. Laws were passed against it, without effect, at Rhodes and Byzantium; and even Aristotle, we are told, conformed to the new custom,[3] unlike the other philosophers, who retained the beard as a badge of their profession. A man with a beard after the Macedonian period implied a philosopher,[4] and we have many allusions to this custom of the later philosophers in such proverbs as: "The beard does not make the sage."[5] For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... This article is about the Greek island of Rhodes. ... Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον, Latin: , ) was an ancient Greek city, which was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ...


Ancient Rome

Shaving seems to have not been known to the Romans during their early history (under the Kings of Rome and the early Republic). Pliny tells us that P. Ticinius was the first who brought a barber to Rome, which was in the 454th year from the founding of the city (that is, around 299 BC). Scipio Africanus was apparently the first among the Romans who shaved his beard. However, after that shaving seems to have caught on very quickly, and soon almost all Roman men were clean-shaven - being clean-shaven became a sign of being Roman and not Greek. Only in the later times of the Republic did many youths shave the beard only partially, and trimmed it so as to give it an ornamental form; other young men oiled their chins to force a premature growth of beard.[6] Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... A boy visiting a barber A barber (from the Latin barba, beard) is someone whose occupation is to cut any type of hair, give shaves, and trim beards. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 304 BC 303 BC 302 BC 301 BC 300 BC 299 BC 298 BC 297 BC 296... Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major (Latin: P·CORNELIVS·P·F·L·N·SCIPIO·AFRICANVS¹) (235–183 BC) was a general in the Second Punic War and statesman of the Roman Republic. ...


Still, beards remained rare among the Romans throughout the Late Republic and the early Principate. In a general way, in Rome at this time, a long beard was considered a mark of slovenliness and squalor. The censors L. Veturius and P. Licinius compelled M. Livius, who had been banished, on his restoration to the city to be shaved, and to lay aside his dirty appearance, and then, but not till then, to come into the Senate.[7] The first time of shaving was regarded as the beginning of manhood, and the day on which this took place was celebrated as a festival.[8] Usually, this was done when the young Roman assumed the toga virilis. Augustus did it in his twenty-fourth year, Caligula in his twentieth. The hair cut off on such occasions was consecrated to some god. Thus Nero put his into a golden box set with pearls, and dedicated it to Jupiter Capitolinus.[9] The Romans, unlike the Greeks, let their beards grow in time of mourning; so did Augustus for the death of Julius Caesar.[10] Other occasions of mourning on which the beard was allowed to grow were, appearance as a reus, condemnation, or some public calamity. The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... Manhood is the period in a males life when he has left behind the innocence of childhood. ... Roman clad in toga The toga was the distinctive garb of Ancient Rome. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Roman emperor. ... For other uses, see Nero (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Reus, Joan Prims Monument Reus is the capital of the comarca of Baix Camp, in the province of Tarragona, Catalonia, located at 117 metres above sea level. ...


In the second century A.D. the Emperor Hadrian, according to Dion, was the first of all the Caesars to grow a beard; Plutarch says that he did it to hide scars on his face. This was a period in Rome of widespread imitation of Greek culture, and many other men grew beards in imitation of Hadrian and the Greek fashion. Until the time of Constantine the Great the emperors appear in busts and coins with beards; but Constantine and his successors to the end of the sixth century, with the exception of Julian, are represented as beardless. Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 –– July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was emperor of Rome from 117 A.D. to 138 A.D., as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... Constantine. ... Look up Julian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Barbarian customs

Tacitus states that among the Catti, a Germanic tribe (perhaps the Chatten), a young man was not allowed to shave or cut his hair until he had slain an enemy. The Lombards or Longobards, derived their fame from the great length of their beards. When Otho the Great said anything serious, he swore by his beard, which covered his breast. For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... The term Germanic peoples may refer to: the Germanic tribes that in the first millennium were seen as a barbarian threat by the Roman Empire and its successors; the Germanic Christianity that in the second millennium came to dominate much of Northern Europe, politically organized in the Holy Roman Empire... Chatten (Catti), a historic German tribe settled in the area of modern-day northern Hesse. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ...


From the Renaissance to the present day

Richard M. Stallman with a beard in the early 21st century.
Richard M. Stallman with a beard in the early 21st century.

In the 15th century, most European men were clean-shaven. Clergymen in 16th century England were usually clean shaven to indicate their celibacy.[citation needed] When a priest became convinced of the doctrines of the Protestant Reformation he would often signal this by allowing his beard to grow, showing that he rejected the tradition of the church and perhaps also its stance on clerical celibacy.[citation needed] The longer the beard, the more striking the statement.[citation needed] Sixteenth century beards were therefore suffered to grow to an amazing length (see the portraits of John Knox, Bishop Gardiner and Thomas Cranmer). Some beards of this time were the Spanish spade beard, the English square cut beard, the forked beard, and the stiletto beard. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 585 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1683 × 1725 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 585 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1683 × 1725 pixel, file size: 1. ... Richard Matthew Stallman (RMS; born March 16, 1953) is the founder of the Free Software movement, the GNU project, the Free Software Foundation, and the League for Programming Freedom. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Reformation redirects here. ... For other persons named John Knox, see John Knox (disambiguation). ... Stephen Gardiner (c. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and...


Strangely, this trend was especially marked during Queen Mary's reign, a time of reaction against Protestant reform (Cardinal Pole's beard is a good example). Queen Elizabeth I, succeeding Mary, is said to have disliked beards and therefore established a tax on them.[citation needed] Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Reginald Pole (1500 – November 17, 1558) was an English prelate, Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Elizabeth I Queen of England and Ireland Queen of France, nominal title Elizabeth I (September 7, 1533–March 24, 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from November 17, 1558 until her death. ...


In urban circles of Western Europe and the Americas, beards were out of fashion after the early 17th century; to such an extent that, in 1698, Peter the Great of Russia levied a tax on beards in order to bring Russian society more in line with contemporary Western Europe.[citation needed] (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... Peter the Great or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр I Алексеевич Pyotr I Alekse`yevich, Пётр Великий Pyotr Veli`kiy) (9 June 1672 – 8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.][1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his...


Throughout the 18th Century beards were unknown among most parts of Western society, especially the nobility and upper classes. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


Beards returned strongly to fashion after the Napoleonic Era. Throughout the nineteenth century facial hair (beards, along with long sideburns and moustaches) was more common than not. Many male European monarchs were bearded (e.g. Alexander III of Russia, Napoleon III of France, Frederick III of Germany), as were many of the leading statesmen and cultural figures (e.g. Benjamin Disraeli, Charles Dickens and Giuseppe Verdi). The stereotypical Victorian male figure in the popular mind remains a stern figure clothed in black whose gravitas is added to by a heavy beard (or long sideburns). However, in the early twentienth century beards fell almost completely out of fashion once more; they became largely the preserve of elderly, old-fashioned eccentrics. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sideburns (or colloquially sideboards[1] or mutton chops[2]) are patches of facial hair on the sides of a mans face, in front of the ears. ... A moustache (sometimes spelled mustache in the United States) is an outgrowth of hair above the upper lip. ... Alexander III Alexandrovich (10 March 1845 – 1 November 1894) (Russian: Александр III Александрович) reigned as Emperor of Russia from 13 March 1881 until his death in 1894. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808 - January 9, 1873) was the son of King Louis Bonaparte and Queen Hortense de Beauharnais; both monarchs of the French puppet state, the Kingdom of Holland. ... Frederick III (Frederick William Nicholas Charles; October 18, 1831 – June 15, 1888), (German: Friedrich III., Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen) was German Emperor and King of Prussia, ruling for 99 days until his death in 1888. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Verdi redirects here. ...


Beards, together with long hair, were reintroduced to mainstream society in Western Europe and the Americas by the hippie movement of the mid 1960s. By the end of the 20th century, the closely clipped Verdi beard, often with a matching integrated moustache, was relatively common. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... For the British TV show, see Hippies (TV series). ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Verdi redirects here. ...


Beards in North America

Maryland Governor Thomas Swann with a long goatee. Such beards were common around the time of the Civil War.
Maryland Governor Thomas Swann with a long goatee. Such beards were common around the time of the Civil War.

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth century, beards were rare in the United States. However, they had become prevalent by the mid-nineteenth century. Up to and following the American Civil War, many famous heroes and General officers had significant beards. A sign of the shift was to be observed in occupants of the Presidency: before Abraham Lincoln, no President had a beard; after Lincoln until William McKinley, every President (except Andrew Johnson) had either a beard or a moustache. The beard's loss of popularity since its nineteenth century heyday is shown by the fact that after this brief "golden age", no President has worn a full beard since Benjamin Harrison, and no President has worn any facial hair at all since William H. Taft. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1475, 120 KB) Description Thomas Swann, Governor and Congressman from Maryland. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1475, 120 KB) Description Thomas Swann, Governor and Congressman from Maryland. ... Categories: People stubs | Governors of Maryland | 1809 births | 1883 deaths | Mayors of Baltimore ... A traditional goatee, notice the mustache par does not touch A goatee is a beard formed by a tuft of hair on the chin and a moustache around the upper lip. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... General is a military rank, in most nations the highest rank, although some nations have the higher rank of Field Marshal. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... William Howard Taft I (September 15, 1857–March 8, 1930) was the 27th President of the United States (1909-1913), and the 10th Chief Justice of the United States (1921 - 1930). ...


Following World War I, beards fell out of vogue. There are several theories as to why the military began shaving beards. When World War I broke out in the 1910s, the use of chemical weapons necessitated that soldiers shave their beards so that gas masks could seal over their faces. The enlistment of military recruits for World War I in 1914 precipitated a major migration of men from rural to urban locales. This was the largest such migration that had ever occurred in the United States up to that time. The rural lives of some of these bearded men included the "Saturday Night bath" as a reality rather than a humorism. The sudden concentration of recruits in crowded army induction centers brought with it disease, including head lice. Remedial action was taken by immediately shaving the faces and cutting the hair of all inductees upon their arrival. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Dressing the wounded during a gas attack by Austin O. Spare, 1918. ... A gas mask is a mask worn on the face to protect the body from airborne pollutants and toxins. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


When the war concluded in 1918 the "Doughboys" returned to a hero's welcome. During this time period the Film Industry was coming into its own and "going to the movies" became a popular pastime. Due to the recent Armistice many of the films had themes related to World War I. These popular films featured actors who portrayed soldiers with their clean shaven faces and "crew cuts". Concurrently, "Madison Avenue's" psychological mass marketing was becoming prevalent. The Gillette Safety Razor Company was one of these marketers' early clients. These events conspired to popularize short hair and clean shaven faces as the only acceptable style for decades to come. Doughboy is a now-outdated slang term for an American infantryman, best known from its use in World War I, although it potentially dates back to the Mexican-American War of 1846-48. ... A white flag is traditionally used to represent a truce. ... A U.S. Marine sporting a high and tight, crew cut hairstyle A crew cut is a type of haircut in which the hair is cut fairly short. ... Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City which carries northbound one-way traffic. ... The Gillette brand logo The Gillette Company (NYSE: G) was founded by King C. Gillette in 1901 as a safety razor manufacturer. ... Collection of Modern Safety Razors - Gillette Fusion Power, Gillette M3Power, Mach3 Turbo Champion, Schick Quattro Chrome, Schick Quattro Power, Gillette Mach3, Gillette Sensor, Schick Xtreme3, Schick Xtreme SubZero, and Schick Xtreme3 Disposables A razor is an edge tool primarily used in shaving. ...

A contemporary beard style is to trim very short.
A contemporary beard style is to trim very short.

From the 1920s to the early 1960s, beards were virtually nonexistent in mainstream America. The few men who wore the beard or portions of the beard during this period were either old, Central Europeans, members of a religious sect that required it, in academia, or part of the counterculture, such as the "beatniks". Download high resolution version (1165x1351, 92 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1165x1351, 92 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Beatnik (disambiguation). ...


Following the Vietnam War, beards exploded in popularity. In the mid-late 1960s and throughout the 1970s, beards were worn by hippies and businessmen alike. Popular rock, soul and folk musicians like The Beatles, Barry White and the male members of Peter, Paul, and Mary wore full beards. The trend of seemingly ubiquitous beards in American culture subsided in the mid 1980s. Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For the British TV show, see Hippies (TV series). ... Folk song redirects here. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Barry Eugene White (born Barrence Eugene Carter, September 12, 1944) – July 4, 2003) was a Grammy Award winning American record producer, songwriter and singer responsible for the creation of numerous hit soul and disco songs. ... Peter, Paul and Mary (often PP&M) was one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. ...


From the 1990s onward, the fashion in beards has generally trended toward either a goatee, Van Dyck, or a closely cropped full beard undercut on the throat. A traditional goatee, notice the mustache par does not touch A goatee is a beard formed by a tuft of hair on the chin and a moustache around the upper lip. ...


One stratum of American society where facial hair is virtually nonexistent is in government and politics. The last President to wear any type of facial hair was William Howard Taft, who was in office nearly a century ago. For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ...


Beards in religion

Beards also play an important role in some religions.


In Greek mythology and art Zeus and Poseidon are always portrayed with beards, but Apollo never is. A bearded Hermes was replaced with the more familiar beardless youth in the 5th century B.C. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Neptune in Copenhagen, Denmark. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ...


Sikhism

The Sikhs consider the beard to be an integral part of the male human body as created by God and believe that it should be preserved, maintained, and respected as such. Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru, ordained and established the keeping of the hair as part of the identity and one of the insignia of Sikhs. Sikhs consider the beard to be part of the nobility and dignity of their manhood. Kesh is also one of the Five Ks for a baptised Sikh. Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... Guru Gobind Singh (Punjabi: ) (22 December 1666 – 7 October 1708) He was born in Patna in India in 1666 and became the tenth Guru of the Sikhs on 11 November 1675, succeeding his father, Guru Tegh Bahadur who was killed by Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. ... Shahrisabz or Shahr-e Sabz (from the Persian meaning green city), also known as Kesh, is a city in Uzbekistan approximately 50 mi. ... The Five Ks, or panj kakaar/kakke, are five items of faith that baptised Khalsa Sikhs wear at all times at the command of the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh who so ordered at the Baisakhi Amrit Sanchar in 1699. ...


Hinduism

The Hindus keep beards depending on caste and Dharma. Many Hindu priests are unshaven as a sign of purity. Keeping beards in Hinduism depends on the Dharma that is being followed. The ancient text followed regarding beards depends on the Deva and other teachings, varying according to whom the devotee worships or follows. In the Dharma it is said if one keeps a moustache it is regarded as a sign of evil or of a soldier[citation needed]. Most original idols lack moustaches, except for the Rakshasa and Asuras, who are considered to be bad or power seeking. Many Sadhus, Yogis, or Yoga practitioners keep beards, and represent all situations of life. This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... This article is about the demon in Hindu mythology. ... In Hindu mythology, the Asura are a group of power-seeking deities, sometimes misleadingly referred to as demons. ... The tone of this article is inappropriate for an encyclopedia. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Judaism

Orthodox Jew in Jerusalem with a beard and trimmed payot (sidelocks).
Orthodox Jew in Jerusalem with a beard and trimmed payot (sidelocks).
Main article: Shaving in Judaism

The Bible states in Leviticus 19:27 that "Ye shall not round the corners of your heads, neither shalt thou mar the corners of thy beard." Talmudic rabbis understood this to mean that a man may not shave his beard with a razor with a single blade, since the cutting action of the blade against the skin "mars" the beard. Because scissors have two blades, halakha (Jewish law) permits their use to trim the beard, as the cutting action comes from contact of the two blades and not the blade against the skin. For this reason, most poskim (Jewish legal decisors) rule that Orthodox Jews may use electric razors to remain cleanshaven, as such shavers cut by trapping the hair between the blades and the metal grating, halakhically a scissor-like action. Some prominent contemporary poskim maintain that electric shavers constitute a razor-like action and consequently prohibit their use. For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Payos redirects here. ... Shaving in Judaism is the subject of much debate and scrutiny. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... Collection of Modern Safety Razors - Gillette Fusion Power, Gillette M3Power, Mach3 Turbo Champion, Schick Quattro Chrome, Schick Quattro Power, Gillette Mach3, Gillette Sensor, Schick Xtreme3, Schick Xtreme SubZero, and Schick Xtreme3 Disposables A razor is an edge tool primarily used in shaving. ... For other uses, see Scissors (disambiguation). ... Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה ; alternate transliterations include Halocho and Halacha), is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions. ... Posek (Hebrew פוסק, IPA: , pl. ... Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, a leading Rabbinical authority for Orthodox Jewry of the second half of the twentieth century. ... Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה ; alternate transliterations include Halocho and Halacha), is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions. ...


Many Orthodox Jews grow beards for social and cultural reasons. Since the electric razor is a relatively modern innovation, virtually all Orthodox Jews grew beards before its advent. Beards are thus symbolic of keeping the traditions of one's ancestors. The Zohar, one of the primary sources of Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism), attributes holiness to the beard, specifying that hairs of the beard symbolize channels of subconscious holy energy that flows from above to the human soul. Therefore, most Hasidic Jews, for whom Kabbalah plays an important role in their religious practice, traditionally do not remove or even trim their beards. The Zohar (Hebrew: זהר Splendor, radiance) is widely considered the most important work of Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Holiness is the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of God or gods. ...


Also, some Jews refrain from shaving during the 30-day mourning period after the death of a close relative, known in Hebrew as the "Sheloshim" (thirty).


Christianity

Jesus is almost always portrayed with a beard in art originating from the Gothic period and later. In paintings and statues most of the Old Testament Biblical characters such as Moses and Abraham and Jesus' New Testament disciples such as St Peter are with beard, as was John the Baptist. John the Evangelist is generally depicted as clean-shaven in Western European art, however. Eight of the figures portrayed in the painting entitled The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci are bearded. Mainstream Christianity holds Isaiah Chapter 50: Verse 6 as a prophesy of Christ's crucifixion, and as so, as a description of Christ having his beard plucked by his tormentors. In recent past the beard trend is in decline among Christian communities. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... A Disciple (from the Latin discipulus, a pupil) is one who receives instruction from another; a scholar; a learner; especially, a follower who has learned to believe in the truth of the doctrine of his teacher; an adherent in doctrine. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... St John the Evangelist, imagined by Jacopo Pontormo, ca 1525 (Santa Felicita, Florence) John the Evangelist (d. ... The Last Supper was the last meal Jesus shared with his apostles before his death. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... For prophecy in the context of revealed religions see Prophet. ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...


In Eastern Christianity, beards are often worn by members of the priesthood, and at times have been required for all believers - see Old Believers. Amish and Hutterite men shave until they are married, then grow a beard and are never thereafter without one, although it is a particular form of a beard (see Visual markers of marital status). Many Syrian Christians from Kerala in India use to wear long beards. Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, Russia, Armenia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... In the context of Russian Orthodox church history, the Old Believers (Russian: ) separated after 1666 - 1667 from the hierarchy of the Russian Orthodox Church as a protest against church reforms introduced by Patriarch Nikon. ... This article is about Old Order Amish, but also refers to other Amish sects. ... Hutterite women at work Hutterites are a communal branch of Anabaptists who, like the Amish and Mennonites, trace their roots to the Radical Reformation of the 16th century. ... Humans use clothing, hairstyle, accessories, jewelry, tattoos, and other bodily adornments as indicators of social status. ... The Saint Thomas Christians are a group of Christians from the Malabar coast (now Kerala) in South India, who follow Syriac Christianity. ... -1...


Nowadays, members of many Catholic religious communities, mainly those of Franciscan origin, use a beard as a sign of their vocation. At various times in her history the Catholic Church permitted and prohibited facial hair.[11] Some Messianic Jews also wear beards to show their observance of the Old Testament. The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... The Baruch Hashem Messianic Synagogue in Dallas, Texas Theology and Practice Messiah · Yeshua · Dance · Seal Religious Texts Messianic Bible translations Movement leaders & Orgs. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism...


Islam

Many Muslims believe that growing a beard is required under Islamic law due to the saying of the Islamic prophet Muhammad that Muslim men should grow their beards and trim their mustaches.[12] There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Sharia (Arabic: transliteration: ) is the body of Islamic religious law. ... The Quran identifies a number of men as prophets of Islam. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ...


In contemporary Muslim practice a longer beard is associated with Sunnis, a more closely trimmed beard with Shia Muslims.[citation needed] Accordingly, in Iraq where ethnic cleansing has taken place to make districts all-Sunni or all-Shi'a, members of the local minority adjust their beard style to avoid recognition.[citation needed]


According to the majority opinions in the four major Sunni schools of jurisprudence, a beard is mandatory for all men,[13] unless they have a medical reason not to grow one. Minority opinions exist in all four schools that the beard is optional, but commendable. Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Madhhab(مذهب) (Madhahib, pl) is an Islamic term that refers to a school of thought or religious jurisprudence (fiqh) within Sunni Islam. ...


Muhammad also was quoted as saying that growing the beard is part of the Abrahamic tradition that Muslims have inherited.[citation needed] Muslims believe that Allah commanded Abraham to keep his beard, shorten his mustache, clip his nails, shave the hair around his genitals, and pluck his armpit hair.[14] Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ...


Rastafari Movement

A male Rastafarian's beard is a sign of his pact with God (Jah or Jehovah), and his Bible is his source of knowledge. Leviticus 21:5 ("They shall not make baldness upon their head, neither shall they shave off the corner of their beard, nor make any cuttings in the flesh.") Likewise, it is not uncommon for a Rastafarian beard to grow uncombed; like dreadlocks. Rasta hairstyle Rastafarianism is a religious movement that believes in the divinity of ex Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Jah (IPA: ) is a name for God, most commonly used in the Rastafari movement. ... This article is about reading of the name of God in Hebrew scripture. ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ... Rastaman with long locks Dreadlocks, sometimes simply called locks or dreads, are interlocked coils of hair which tend to form by themselves, in all hair types, if the hair is washed regularly and allowed to grow naturally without the use of brushes, combs, razors, or scissors for a long period...


Beards in music

The 20th century American jazz drummer and bandleader Buddy Rich famously fired members of his band for wearing beards.[1] Dusty Hill and Billy Gibbons of the famous rock band ZZ Top are also renowned for having very distinctive facial hair. Ironically, ZZ Top's drummer Frank Beard (called "Rube Beard" on earlier albums) is the one member of the group who, despite his surname, and sporting a mustache since the early days of the band, does not wear a beard. Alternative Folk musician Sam Beam, better known as Iron & Wine, is known for always sporting a full beard. For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For the comic book character, see Drummer (comics). ... Bernard Buddy Rich (September 30, 1917 Brooklyn, New York – April 2, 1987) was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. ... Joe Michael Dusty Hill (born May 19, 1949, in Dallas, Texas, USA) is bassist and vocalist with Texas Boogie-Blues-Rock group ZZ Top. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... ZZ Top (pronounced ) is an American hard rock band formed in 1969 in Houston, Texas. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... -1... Iron & Wine is the stage and recording name for Florida-based folk rock singer-songwriter Sam Beam. ...


The Beatles, notably John Lennon (see Abbey Road cover), George Harrison, Paul McCartney (during the sessions for Let It Be), and Ringo Starr who also had a beard during Abbey Road and through till the present, sported full beards in the last days of the band. Also did Jim Morrison in the last few years of his life, but a few times shaved it off, as in his last days. The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Back cover The back cover of the original 1969 UK LP. Note that Her Majesty is not listed, unlike later reissues and the compact disc version—originally making it a hidden track. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, entrepreneur, painter, record producer, film producer, and animal-rights activist. ... Let It Be was an album by The Beatles, released on May 8, 1970. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born 7 July 1940), better known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award-winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Abbey Road can refer to: Abbey Road (street), a street in London, England Abbey Road Studios, a recording studio complex owned by the EMI company Abbey Road (album), by The Beatles, 1969 The Abbey Road E.P., by Red Hot Chili Peppers Abbey Road (unreleased b side) , by Tori Amos... For other persons named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison. ...


Several Heavy Metal musicians like Lemmy Kilmister, Kerry King, James Hetfield, Zakk Wylde, and Scott Ian sport beards. Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Lemmy Kilmister (born Ian Fraiser Kilmister on December 24, 1945, also known as Ian Fraiser Willis and Lemmy the Lurch) is an English lead vocalist and bass guitarist primarily known as the founding member and leader of the heavy metal band Motörhead. ... Kerry King (born June 3, 1964 in Los Angeles, California) is a guitarist, best known as one of the founding members of the thrash metal band Slayer. ... James Alan Hetfield (born 3 August 1963, Downey, California[1]) is the main songwriter (with drummer Lars Ulrich and sometimes guitarist Kirk Hammett), co-founder, vocalist and rhythm guitarist of the American thrash/heavy metal band Metallica. ... Zakk Wylde (born Jeffrey Phillip Wiedlandt on January 14, 1967 in Bayonne, New Jersey) is an American musician, who is best known for his roles as a guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne and founder of Black Label Society. ... Scott Ian Rosenfeld (born December 31, 1963) is the rhythm guitarist for the metal band Anthrax who uses the stage name Scott Ian. ...


Leland Sklar, a prolific session bass guitar player, is noted for his long hair and a long flowing beard. In the past few years ex-Nirvana drummer and Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl has famously sported a beard. Leland Lee Bruce Sklar (born May 28, 1947, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American bass player, singer and composer. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sideman. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ...


Modern prohibition of beards

Religions

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons)

LDS Church Presidents from Brigham Young to George Albert Smith all wore beards of some manner. But from the time of David O. McKay through Thomas S. Monson, general Church leaders have been uniformly clean-shaven. Mormon men in general have followed suit, though this is not mandated by scripture or Church policy. Having a beard does not disqualify a man from temple attendance, nor from serving in many positions of local leadership. For other uses, see Brigham Young (disambiguation). ... George Albert Smith (April 4, 1870 – April 4, 1951) was an influential religious leader and the eighth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... For other persons of the same name, see David McKay. ... This article is about the Latter-day Saint leader. ...


Full-time missionaries are clean-shaven as a matter of policy. Bishops and stake presidents are strongly encouraged not to grow facial hair. Students at Brigham Young University adhere to an Honor Code containing Dress and Grooming Standards. This includes the following language: "If worn, moustaches should be neatly trimmed and may not extend beyond or below the corners of the mouth. Men are expected to be clean shaven; beards are not acceptable." [15] Exceptions are made for BYU students who must keep their beard for medical reasons. While such exceptions once applied to religious reasons as well, such is not the current administrative stance of BYU. Diocesan College, or Bishops as it is commonly known, is a private school situated in the leafy suburb of Rondebosch in Cape Town, South Africa, at the foot of Table Mountain. ... A stake president is a title held by a Mormon religious leader who oversees a unit of the church called a stake. ... , Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is a private coeducational school completely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church) and run under the auspices of its Church Educational System. ...


Sports

Today, for practical reasons (with some exceptions), it is illegal for amateur boxers to have beards. As a safety precaution, high school wrestlers must be clean-shaven before each match, though neatly trimmed moustaches are often allowed. For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ...


The Cincinnati Reds, Major League Baseball's oldest existing team, had a longstanding enforced policy where all players had to be completely clean shaven (no beards, long sideburns or moustaches). However, this policy was abolished following the sale of the team by Marge Schott. Margaret Unnewehr Schott (August 18, 1928 – March 2, 2004) was the controversial former managing general partner, president and CEO of the National Leagues Cincinnati Reds franchise from 1984 to 1999. ...


Under owner George Steinbrenner, the New York Yankees baseball team has had a strict dress code that forbids long hair and facial hair below the lip. More recently, Willie Randolph and Joe Girardi, both former Yankee assistant coaches, adopted a similar clean-shaven policy for their ballclubs; the New York Mets and Florida Marlins, respectively. Fredi Gonzalez, who replaced Girardi as the Marlins' manager, dropped that policy when he took over after the 2006 season. George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Willie Larry Randolph (born July 6, 1954, in Holly Hill, South Carolina) is the manager of the New York Mets in Major League Baseball and former player for the Pittsburgh Pirates, New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers, Oakland Athletics, Milwaukee Brewers, and New York Mets. ... Joseph Elliot Girardi (born October 14, 1964 in Peoria, Illinois) is the current manager of the New York Yankees. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42, Shea Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964-2008) Citi Field (2009-Present) Polo Grounds... Major league affiliations National League (1993–present) East Division (1993–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 42 Name Florida Marlins (1993–present) Other nicknames The Fish Ballpark Dolphin Stadium (1993–present) a. ... Fredi González Fredi González is a four-year third base coach for the Atlanta Braves association. ...


Playoff beard is a tradition common on some teams in the NHL and now in other leagues wherein players allow their beards to grow from the beginning of the playoff season until the playoffs are over for their team. A playoff-beard is the superstitious practice of a National Hockey League player not shaving his beard during the Stanley Cup playoffs. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ...


Armed forces

Canada

The Canadian Forces permits moustaches, provided they are neatly trimmed and do not pass beyond the corners of the mouth; an exception to this is the handlebar moustache, which is permitted. Generally speaking, beards are not permitted to CF personnel with the following exceptions: The Canadian Forces (CF) (French: Forces canadiennes (FC)) are the unified armed forces of Canada, governed by the National Defence Act, which states: The Canadian Forces are the armed forces of Her Majesty raised by Canada and consist of one Service called the Canadian Armed Forces. ... A moustache (sometimes spelled mustache in the United States) is an outgrowth of hair above the upper lip. ... Example of a handlebar moustache (Lord Kitchener) An American man with a white handlebar moustache Albrecht von Roon George V of the United Kingdom A handlebar moustache is a moustache with particularly lengthy, often graspable, extremities. ...

  • members wearing the naval uniform (tradition)
  • members of an infantry pioneer platoon (tradition)
  • members who must maintain a beard due to religious requirements - (Muslims, Sikhs or orthodox Jews, for example)
  • members with a medical condition which precludes shaving

These exceptions notwithstanding, in no case is a beard permitted without a moustache, and only full beards may be worn (not goatees, van dykes, etc.). Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... A US army combat engineer setting up a communications cable. ... A traditional goatee, notice the mustache par does not touch A goatee is a beard formed by a tuft of hair on the chin and a moustache around the upper lip. ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Anton) van Dyck (22 March 1599 – 9 December 1641) was a Flemish artist who became the leading court painter in England. ...


Personnel with beards may still be required to modify or shave off the beard, as environmental or tactical circumstances dictate (e.g., to facilitate the wearing of a gas mask).


Beards are also allowed to be worn by personnel conducting OPFOR duties. This article is about a military term. ...


France

The sappers ("sapeurs") of the French Foreign Legion traditionally feature large beards
The sappers ("sapeurs") of the French Foreign Legion traditionally feature large beards

The "decree N° 75-675 regarding regulations for general discipline in the Armies of the 28th July 1975, modified"[16] regulates facial hair in the French armed forces. Military personnel are allowed to grow a beard or moustache only during periods when they are out of uniform. The beard must be "correctly trimmed", and provisions are stated for a possible ban of beards by the military authorities to ensure compatibility with certain equipment. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (668x784, 116 KB) [edit] Description  dessin de jp Négre daprés une photo de la revue Képi Blanc fr:User:Jp. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (668x784, 116 KB) [edit] Description  dessin de jp Négre daprés une photo de la revue Képi Blanc fr:User:Jp. ... Legionnaire redirects here. ...


However, within the Foreign Legion, sappers (combat engineers) are traditionally encouraged to grow a large beard. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with combat engineering. ...


The gendarmes, also by tradition, may grow a moustache. French Gendarmes, in the traditional kepi, guarding the Paris Hall of Justice See gendarmerie for similar forces in other countries. ...


Israel

According to the regulations of the Israel Defense Forces, growing a moustache or a beard is prohibited. Allowances are made in the following cases: Emblem of the IDF The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ...

  • The soldier is a practicing Orthodox Jew and requests permission to grow a beard for religious reasons.
  • The soldier has a medical condition (such as skin problems) that would be aggravated by shaving (medical documentation is necessary)
  • The soldier had a beard before joining the army and requests permission to keep it.
  • The soldier has completed his compulsory service and is serving in the career army.

If a soldier has obtained permission to grow a beard, the beard must either be: Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, a leading Rabbinical authority for Orthodox Jewry of the second half of the twentieth century. ...

  • A full beard - extending from the sideburns to the chin on both sides of the face.
  • A goatee - starting from the middle of the face on both sides and extending to the chin, including a moustache.

Sideburns (or colloquially sideboards[1] or mutton chops[2]) are patches of facial hair on the sides of a mans face, in front of the ears. ... A traditional goatee, notice the mustache par does not touch A goatee is a beard formed by a tuft of hair on the chin and a moustache around the upper lip. ...

The Netherlands

In the Dutch army, officers and soldiers may not grow beards, although small moustaches are permissible. High-ranking officers may grow full beards, although this is rare. Beards are worn at times by the Dutch Marines. A beard without a moustache is uncommon in The Netherlands. Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain...


Spain

The Spanish Legion allows beards to be grown. The Spanish Legion (Spanish: Legión Española or simply La Legión), formerly Spanish Foreign Legion, is an elite unit of the Spanish Army. ...


United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, the Royal Navy allows "full sets" (beards and moustaches together) but not beards or moustaches alone. The other British armed services allow moustaches only. Exceptions are beards grown for religious reasons (usually by Sikhs), though in the event of conflict in which the use of chemical or biological weapons is likely, they may be required to shave a strip around the seal of a respirator. Beards are also permitted for medical reasons, such as temporary skin irritations, or by infantry pioneer warrant officers, colour sergeants and sergeants, who traditionally wear beards. Any style of facial hair is allowed in British police forces as long as it is neatly trimmed. Beards are also permitted by special forces when not on base, ie covert intelligence operations or behind enemy lines. This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... Polish military engineers at work in Pakistan A military engineer is primarily responsible for the design and construction of offensive, defensive and logistical structures for warfare. ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... Colour Sergeant (CSgt or C/Sgt) is an non-commissioned rank in the Royal Marines, ranking above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... The British police are a group of similar but independent police services which operate in the United Kingdom. ...


United States

The U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps justify banning beards on the basis of both hygiene and of the necessity for a good seal with gas masks. The U.S. Navy did allow beards for a time in the 1970s and 1980s, following a directive from Chief of Naval Operations Elmo Russell Zumwalt, Jr., but subsequently banned them again. The Navy allows for a shipmate to grow a beard granted he receive a no shave chit from sick bay. The U.S. Coast Guard allowed beards until 1986, when they were banned by the Commandant, Admiral Paul Yost. The vast majority of police forces across the United States still ban beards. However, moustaches are generally allowed in both the military and police forces (except for those undergoing basic training). U.S. Army Special Forces and other U.S. Special Operation Forces have been allowed to wear beards in Afghanistan, Iraq, and other middle-eastern countries in order to better fit in with the indigenous population. The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... USN redirects here. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979; it is commonly called The Seventies. ... The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is the senior military officer in the United States Navy. ... Elmo R. Zumwalt Elmo Russell Zumwalt, Jr. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Paul Alexander Yost, Jr. ...


Also, those with pseudofolliculitis barbae or severe acne are allowed to have neatly trimmed beards with a doctor's permit. Pseudofolliculitis barbae (pronounced //) is a medical term for persistent inflammation caused by shaving. ...


Sweden and Norway

Laws on the matter are quite liberal; both length of hair and beard depends on the soldier's position. The Royal Guard is required to be clean shaven. Most operative personnel are not allowed to wear them (so as not to interfere with gas masks) unless:

  • The soldier attains express permission to grow his beard from a high-ranking officer.
  • The soldier already has a beard upon his enlistment and requests to continue growing it or maintain it at its present length.

Quotes regarding beards

  • "There are two kinds of people in this world that go around beardless — boys and women — and I am neither one." -Greek saying
  • "A kiss without a moustache, is like soup without salt." - Breton saying
  • "A man without a moustache is like a cat without a tail." - Arab Saying
  • "A woman with a beard looks like a man. A man without a beard looks like a woman." - Afghan Saying
  • "The beard is the handsomeness of the face, and a wife is the joy in a man's heart." - R' Akiva, Eicha Rabbah
  • Leonato: You may light on a husband that hath no beard.
    Beatrice: What should I do with him? Dress him in my apparel and make him my waiting-gentlewoman? He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man: and he that is more than a youth is not for me, and he that is less than a man, I am not for him… -William Shakespeare - Excerpt from 'Much Ado About Nothing' – Act 2, Scene I

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ...

Early Christian attitudes

  • St Clement of Alexandria
    • "The hair of the chin showed him to be a man." St Clement of Alexandria (c.195, E), 2.271
    • "How womanly it is for one who is a man to comb himself and shave himself with a razor, for the sake of fine effect, and to arrange his hair at the mirror, shave his cheeks, pluck hairs out of them, and smooth them!…For God wished women to be smooth and to rejoice in their locks alone growing spontaneously, as a horse in his mane. But He adorned man like the lions, with a beard, and endowed him as an attribute of manhood, with a hairy chest--a sign of strength and rule." St. Clement of Alexandria, 2.275
    • "This, then, is the mark of the man, the beard. By this, he is seen to be a man. It is older than Eve. It is the token of the superior nature….It is therefore unholy to desecrate the symbol of manhood, hairiness.” St. Clement of Alexandria, 2.276
    • "It is not lawful to pluck out the beard, man’s natural and noble adornment." St. Clement of Alexandria, 2.277
  • St Cyprian
    • "In their manners, there was no discipline. In men, their beards were defaced." St Cyprian (c. 250, W), 5.438
    • "The beard must not be plucked. 'You will not deface the figure of your beard'." (Leviticus 19:27) St. Cyprian, 5.553
  • Lactantius
    • "The nature of the beard contributes in an incredible degree to distinguish the maturity of bodies, or to distinguish the sex, or to contribute to the beauty of manliness and strength." Lactantius (c. 304-314, W), 7.288
  • Apostolic Constitutions
    • "Men may not destroy the hair of their beards and unnaturally change the form of a man. For the Law says, “You will not deface your beards.” For God the Creator has made this decent for women, but has determined that it is unsuitable for men." Apostolic Constitutions (compiled c.390, E) 7.392. (1)

Clement of Alexandria (Titus Flavius Clemens), was the first member of the Church of Alexandria to be more than a name, and one of its most distinguished teachers. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Eve, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Eve from the side of Adam. ... This page is about Cyprian, bishop of Carthage. ... This page is about Cyprian, bishop of Carthage. ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ... Lucius Caelius (or Caecilius?) Firmianus Lactantius was an early Christian author who wrote in Latin (c. ... Lucius Caelius (or Caecilius?) Firmianus Lactantius was an early Christian author who wrote in Latin (c. ... The Apostolic Constitutions is a late 4th century collection, in 8 books, of independent, though closely related, treatises on Early Christian discipline, worship, and doctrine, intended to serve as a manual of guidance for the clergy, and to some extent for the laity. ... The Apostolic Constitutions is a late 4th century collection, in 8 books, of independent, though closely related, treatises on Early Christian discipline, worship, and doctrine, intended to serve as a manual of guidance for the clergy, and to some extent for the laity. ...

Famous personalities with beards

Religious figures in scripture and/or history

This article is about the biblical Noah. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... David and Goliath, by Caravaggio, c. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... // Guru Nanak Dev[1] (Punjabi: , ) (20th October 1469, Nankana Sahib, Punjab, (now Pakistan) - 22 September 1539, Kartarpur, Punjab, India), was the founder of Sikhism, and the first of the ten Sikh Gurus. ...

Scientists

This article is about the philosopher. ... Concern has been expressed that this article or section is missing information about: discussions of existence of atoms among prominent physicists up to the end of 19th century. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... This page is about the Classical Greek philosopher. ... Galileo redirects here. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Galileo is often referred to as the Father of Modern Astronomy. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... For other uses of this name, including the grammarian Aristarchus of Samothrace, see Aristarchus Statue of Aristarchus at Aristotle University in Thessalonica, Greece Aristarchus (Greek: Ἀρίσταρχος; 310 BC - ca. ... Galileo is often referred to as the Father of Modern Astronomy. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... For other uses, see Archimedes (disambiguation). ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Inventor (disambiguation). ... 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Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Inventor (disambiguation). ... Greek anatome, from ana-temnein, to cut up), is the branch of biology that deals with the structure and organization of living things; thus there is animal anatomy (zootomy) and plant anatomy (phytonomy). ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... 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Hand mit Ringen: print of Wilhelm Röntgens first medical x-ray, of his wifes hand, taken on 22 December 1895 and presented to Professor Ludwig Zehnder of the Physik Institut, University of Freiburg, on 1 January 1896[1][2] Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (March 27, 1845 – February... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... An X-ray picture (radiograph), taken by Wilhelm Röntgen in 1896, of his wife, Anna Bertha Ludwigs[1] hand X-rays (or Röntgen rays) are a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength in the range of 10 to 0. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... Rudolf Clausius - physicist and mathematician Rudolf Julius Emanuel Clausius (January 2, 1822 – August 24, 1888), was a German physicist and mathematician. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Thermodynamics (from the Greek θερμη, therme, meaning heat and δυναμις, dynamis, meaning power) is a branch of physics that studies the effects of changes in temperature, pressure, and volume on physical systems at the macroscopic scale by analyzing the collective motion of their particles using statistics. ... Sir William Crookes, OM, FRS (17 June 1832 – 4 April 1919) was an English chemist and physicist. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Pierre Curie (May 15, 1859 – died April 19, 1906) was a French physicist, a pioneer in crystallography, magnetism, piezoelectricity and radioactivity. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Crystallography (from the Greek words crystallon = cold drop / frozen drop, with its meaning extending to all solids with some degree of transparency, and graphein = write) is the experimental science of determining the arrangement of atoms in solids. ... For other senses of this word, see magnetism (disambiguation). ... Piezoelectricity is the ability of some materials (notably crystals and certain ceramics) to generate an electric potential[1] in response to applied mechanical stress. ... Radioactivity may mean: Look up radioactivity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Karl Ferdinand Braun (6 June 1850 in Fulda, Germany – 20 April 1918 in New York City, U.S.) was a German inventor, physicist and Nobel Prize laureate. ... For other uses, see Inventor (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The word laureate or laureated has came in English to signify eminent, or associated with glory, literary or military. ... Ludwig Eduard Boltzmann (Vienna, Austrian Empire, February 20, 1844 – Duino near Trieste, September 5, 1906) was an Austrian physicist famous for his founding contributions in the fields of statistical mechanics and statistical thermodynamics. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Statistical mechanics is the application of probability theory, which includes mathematical tools for dealing with large populations, to the field of mechanics, which is concerned with the motion of particles or objects when subjected to a force. ... Statistical mechanics is the application of statistics, which includes mathematical tools for dealing with large populations, to the field of mechanics, which is concerned with the motion of particles or objects when subjected to a force. ... For the SI unit of radioactivity, see Becquerel. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Radioactivity may mean: Look up radioactivity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image:Lorand Eotvos. ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... George FitzGerald George Francis FitzGerald, or Fitzgerald, (3 August 1851 – 22 February 1901) was a professor of natural and experimental philosophy (i. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Josiah Willard Gibbs (February 11, 1839 New Haven – April 28, 1903 New Haven) was one of the very first American theoretical physicists and chemists. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Peter Andreas Hansen (December 8, 1795 – March 28, 1874), Danish astronomer, was born at Tondern, in the duchy of Schleswig (now Tønder, Denmark). ... Galileo is often referred to as the Father of Modern Astronomy. ... Oliver Heaviside (May 18, 1850 – February 3, 1925) was a self-taught English electrical engineer, mathematician, and physicist who adapted complex numbers to the study of electrical circuits, developed techniques for applying Laplace transforms to the solution of differential equations, reformulated Maxwells field equations in terms of electric and... Relationship of the atmosphere and ionosphere The ionosphere is the uppermost part of the atmosphere, distinguished because it is ionized by solar radiation. ... Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (February 22, 1857 - January 1, 1894) was the German physicist and mechanician for whom the hertz, an SI unit, is named. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Maxwells equations are the set of four equations, attributed to James Clerk Maxwell, that describe the behavior of both the electric and magnetic fields, as well as their interactions with matter. ... James Prescott Joule, FRS (IPA: ; December 24, 1818 – October 11, 1889) was an English physicist (and brewer), born in Salford, Lancashire. ... For other uses, see Heat (disambiguation) In physics, heat, symbolized by Q, is energy transferred from one body or system to another due to a difference in temperature. ... In physics, mechanical work is the amount of energy transferred by a force. ... Kirchhoff redirects here. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... An electrical network or electrical circuit is an interconnection of analog electrical elements such as resistors, inductors, capacitors, diodes, switches and transistors. ... Animation of the dispersion of light as it travels through a triangular prism. ... As the temperature decreases, the peak of the black-body radiation curve moves to lower intensities and longer wavelengths. ... Kepler redirects here. ... Gabriel Jonas Lippmann (August 16, 1845 – July 13, 1921) was a Franco-Luxembourgian physicist and inventor. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Interference (disambiguation). ... Early colour photograph by Lippmann Named after Gabriel Lippmann, physicist. ... Willebrord Snellius[1] (born Willebrord Snel van Royen[2]) (1580–October 30, 1626, Leiden) was a Dutch astronomer and mathematician, most famous for the law of refraction now known as Snells law. ... For the property of metals, see refraction (metallurgy). ... Refraction of light at the interface between two media of different refractive indices, with n2 > n1. ... Joseph Swan Sir Joseph Wilson Swan (October 31, 1828 – May 27, 1914) was an English physicist and chemist, most famous for the development of the light bulb. ... The incandescent light bulb or incandescent lamp is a source of artificial light that works by incandescence, (a general term for heat-driven light emissions which includes the simple case of black body radiation). ...

Political leaders

Flavius Claudius Iulianus (331–June 26, 363), was a Roman Emperor (361–363) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... The Misopogon, or Beard-Hater, is a satirical essay on philosophers by the emperor Julian. ... á¹¢alāḥ ad-DÄ«n YÅ«suf ibn AyyÅ«b (Arabic: ‎), known in English as Saladin, was a 12th-century Kurd who became Sultan of Egypt and Syria, and a major Muslim political and military leader. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Ibn Saud Abdul Aziz bin Abdul Rahman ibn Faisal Al Saud (1880 - November 9, 1953), also known by several abbreviated forms of this name, or simply as Ibn Saud was first monarch of Saudi Arabia. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 - January 17, 1893) was the 19th (1877-1881) President of the United States. ... The Federal Government of the United States was established by the United States politics is dominated by the two major parties, the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The United States Armed Forces are the overall unified military forces of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For his son, also a prominent politician, see James Rudolph Garfield. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... A group of Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government during the American Civil War. ... For other uses of Stonewall Jackson, see Stonewall Jackson (disambiguation). ... General Sherman redirects here. ... This article is about the Prime Minister of India. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... The President of Cuba is the Head of State of Cuba. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ...

Fictional figures

Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character within the Harry Potter series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Merlin dictating his poems, as illustrated in a French book from the 13th century For other uses, see Merlin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ...

Beard styles

Barber's guide to men's facial hair styles, circa 1900.

Beard hair is most commonly removed by shaving. If only the area above the upper lip is left unshaven, the resulting facial hairstyle is known as a moustache; if hair is left only on the chin, the style is a chin beard. The combination of a moustache and a chin beard is a goatee or Van Dyck, unless the mustache and chin beard are connected, in which case it is known as a circle beard. This article is about the use of a razor. ... Joseph Stalin, one of the most famous historical figures with a moustache For the Swedish heavy metal band, see Mustasch. ... A traditional goatee, notice the mustache par does not touch A goatee is a beard formed by a tuft of hair on the chin and a moustache around the upper lip. ...

  • Full - downward flowing beard with either styled or integrated moustache
  • Sideburns - hair grown from the temples down the cheeks toward the jawline. Sometimes with a moustache.
  • Chinstrap - a beard with long sideburns that comes forward and ends under the chin, resembling a chinstrap, hence the name.
  • Garibaldi - wide, full beard with rounded bottom and integrated moustache
  • Casey - A full beard normally found on young adolescents, usually thinner until the owner gets older, when it will grow thicker than most.
  • Goatee - A tuft of hair grown on the chin, sometimes resembling a billy goat's.
  • Hollywoodian- A beard with integrated mustache that is worn on the lower part of the chin and jaw area, without connecting sideburns.
  • Reed - A beard with integrated mustache that is worn on the lower part of the chin and jaw area that tapers towards the ears without connecting side burns.
  • Royale - is a narrow pointed beard extending from the chin. The style was popular in France during the period of the Second Empire, from which it gets its alternative name, the imperial or impériale.
  • Stubble - a very short beard of only one to a few days growth. This became fashionable during the heyday of Miami Vice. During this time, a modified electric razor called the Miami Device became popular, which would trim stubble to a preset length.
  • Van Dyck - A goatee accompanied by a moustache.
  • Verdi - short beard with rounded bottom and slightly shaven cheeks with prominent moustache
  • Neck Beard - Similar to the Chinstrap, but with the chin and jawline shaven, leaving hair to grow only on the neck. While never as popular as other beard styles, a few noted historical figures have worn this type of beard, such as Henry Thoreau and Horace Greeley.
  • Soul patch - a small beard just below the lower lip and above the chin
  • Stashburns - long muttonchop type sideburns connected to a mustache, but with a shaved chin

A man with a full beard A Full Beard is a type of downward flowing beard with either styled or integrated moustache; i. ... Sideburns (or colloquially sideboards[1] or mutton chops[2]) are patches of facial hair on the sides of a mans face, in front of the ears. ... Giuseppe Garibaldi (July 4, 1807 – June 2, 1882) was an Italian patriot and General of the Risorgimento. ... A traditional goatee, notice the mustache par does not touch A goatee is a beard formed by a tuft of hair on the chin and a moustache around the upper lip. ... This article is about the part of the face. ... This article is about the domestic species. ... This image shows stubble after a few days without shaving Stubble on a persons face is the unshaven hair growth that exists before it becomes long enough to cover the skin and be considered a full beard or moustache. ... For the 2006 movie, see Miami Vice (film). ... Joseph Stalin, one of the most famous historical figures with a moustache For the Swedish heavy metal band, see Mustasch. ... Verdi redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 - May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau) was a noted American author and philosopher who is most famous for Walden, his essay on civil disobedience, and his call for the preservation of wilderness. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Liberal Republican Party, reformer and politician. ... American musician Steve Vai with a soul patch. ...

See also

The Beard Liberation Front is a British pressure group which campaigns in support of beards and opposes discrimination against those who wear them. ... Portrait: Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden in military dress uniform, with medals. ... One kind of modern beard. ... A five oclock shadow is beard growth visible late in the day on a man whose face was clean-shaven in the morning. ... . ... Joseph Stalin, one of the most famous historical figures with a moustache For the Swedish heavy metal band, see Mustasch. ... Sideburns (or colloquially sideboards[1] or mutton chops[2]) are patches of facial hair on the sides of a mans face, in front of the ears. ... This image shows stubble after a few days without shaving Stubble on a persons face is the unshaven hair growth that exists before it becomes long enough to cover the skin and be considered a full beard or moustache. ... Abraham Lincoln sporting the chin curtain beard. ... This article is about the use of a razor. ... A man with a clean-shaven face A clean-shaven beard is one that has been totally removed, usually by shaving or other more radical means of depilation. ... A boy visiting a barber A barber (from the Latin barba, beard) is someone whose occupation is to cut any type of hair, give shaves, and trim beards. ... Jennifer Miller, bearded lady A bearded lady or bearded woman is a woman who has a visible beard. ... Depilation is a generic term for hair removal which affects the part of the hair above the surface of the skin. ... Barbatus is a word of Latin origin meaning bearded. ...

Further reading

  • Reginald Reynolds: Beards: Their Social Standing, Religious Involvements, Decorative Possibilities, and Value in Offence and Defence Through the Ages (Doubleday, 1949) (ISBN 0-15-610845-3)
  • Helen Bunkin, Randall Williams: Beards, Beards, Beards (Hunter & Cyr, 2000) (ISBN 1-58838-001-7)
  • Allan Peterkin: One Thousand Beards. A Cultural History of Facial Hair (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2001) (ISBN 1-55152-107-5)
  • A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs, David W. Bercot, Editor, pg 66-67.

Reginald Arthur Reynolds (1905-1958) was an English left wing writer, a Quaker and husband of left wing novelist Ethel Mannin, who he married in 1938. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article is about the year. ...

References

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Harry Thurston Peck (November 24, 1856 - March 23, 1914) was an American classical scholar, author, editor, and critic, born at Stamford, Conn. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Athen. xiii. 565 a (cited by Peck)
  2. ^ Chrysippus ap. Athen. xiii. 565 a (cited by Peck)
  3. ^ Diog. Laert.v. 1 (cited by Peck)
  4. ^ cf. Pers.iv. 1, magister barbatus of Socrates (cited by Peck)
  5. ^ Ancient Greek: πωγωνοτροφία φιλόσοφον οὐ ποιεῖ. De Is. et Osir. 3 (cited by Peck)
  6. ^ Petron. 75, 10 (cited by Peck)
  7. ^ Liv.xxvii. 34 (cited by Peck)
  8. ^ Juv.iii. 186 (cited by Peck)
  9. ^ Suet. Ner.12 (cited by Peck)
  10. ^ Dio Cass. xlviii. 34 (cited by Peck)
  11. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia entry
  12. ^ Sahih Bukhari, Book 72, Hadith #780
  13. ^ al-Jibaly, Muhammad. "The Beard Between the Salaf & the Khalaf." Kitab as-Sunnah Publishing, page 1.
  14. ^ Sahih Bukhari, Book 72, Hadith #779
  15. ^ Honor Code - Honor Code Statement
  16. ^ Décret N° 75-675 portant règlement de discipline générale dans les armées du 28 juillet 1975, modifié

Beginning of Homers Odyssey The Ancient Greek language is the historical stage of the Greek language[1] as it existed during the Archaic (9th–6th centuries BC) and Classical (5th–4th centuries BC) periods in Ancient Greece. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Beard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3217 words)
Beards, together with long hair, were reintroduced to mainstream society in Western Europe and the Americas by the hippie movement of the mid 1960s.
Beards are also permitted for medical reasons, such as temporary skin irritations, or by infantry pioneer warrant officers, colour sergeants and sergeants, who traditionally wear beards.
The combination of a mustache and a chin beard is a goatee or Van Dyck, unless the mustache and chin beard are connected, in which case it is known as a circle beard.
Charles A. Beard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1004 words)
Beard was thus one of the leading proponents of United States isolationism.
In addition, Beard's foreign policy views have become popular with supporters of paleoconservatism, such as Pat Buchanan, which is perhaps ironic considering Beard's generally liberal (or progressive) stance on most issues.
Beard's stress on greed and economic motivation influenced the "Wisconsin school" of new left historians William Appleman Williams, Gabriel Kolko, and James Weinstein.
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