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Encyclopedia > Bear Mountain State Park
Bear Mountain State Park
IUCN Category II (National Park)
View of the Hudson River from Bear Mountain
Location New York, USA
Nearest city New York City
Coordinates 41°18′46″N 74°00′21″W / 41.31278, -74.00583
Area 5,067 acres (21 km²)
Established 1913
Governing body Palisades Interstate Park Commission

Bear Mountain State Park is located on the west side of the Hudson River in Rockland County, New York. The 5067 acre (21 km²) park offers biking, hiking, boating, picnicking, swimming, cross-country skiing, sledding and ice-skating as well as a zoo, trailside museums, a hotel, a carousel and a dining facility. Although popularly thought of as part of Harriman State Park, Bear Mountain State Park is a separate entity. The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... This article is about national parks. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 221 pixelsFull resolution (2013 × 555 pixels, file size: 216 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)View from Bear Mountain, New York. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... According to the USGS GNIS, the state of New York in the United States has 11 peaks named Bear Mountain. ... This article is about the state. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Palisades Interstate Park Commission was formed in 1900 by governors Theodore Roosevelt of New York and Foster Voorhees of New Jersey in response to the destruction of the Palisades by quarry operators in the late 19th century. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... The Tappan Zee Bridge, in a view looking toward Rockland. ... ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... // Boating, the leisurely activity of traveling by boat typically refers to the recreational use of boats whether power boats, sail boats, or yachts (large vessels), focused on the travel itself, as well as sports activities, such as fishing or waterskiing. ... In contemporary usage, picnic can be defined simply as a pleasure excursion at which a meal is eaten outdoors, ideally, taking place in a beautiful landscape. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... Outdoor ice skating in Austria Ice skating is traveling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices moulded into special boots (or, more primitively, without the boots, tied to regular footwear). ... A zoo. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... For other uses, see Hotel (disambiguation). ... There is also a Harriman State Park in Idaho. ...

Contents

History

View of Bear Mountain Bridge from the mountain summit
View of Bear Mountain Bridge from the mountain summit

During the American Revolutionary War when control of the Hudson River was viewed by the British as essential to dominating the American territories, the area that was to become the park saw several significant military engagements. In 1777 British troops routed Patriots at Fort Montgomery; two years later the Americans under Anthony Wayne would try to take it back. Download high resolution version (1280x960, 142 KB)Bear Mountain Bridge from the top of Bear Mountain PD File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 142 KB)Bear Mountain Bridge from the top of Bear Mountain PD File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Bear Mountain Bridge is a toll suspension bridge in New York State, carrying U.S. Highways 202 and 6, as well as the Appalachian Trail, across the Hudson River between Rockland and Orange Counties to the west and Westchester and Putnam Counties to the east. ... This article is about military actions only. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Anthony Wayne (January 1, 1745 - December 15, 1796), was a United States Army general and statesman. ...


The American Industrial Revolution was supplied, in part, from local forests and iron mines. Resource utilization took a heavy toll on the region, especially lumbering and agriculture, since the poor, thin soils on hillsides were easily depleted. Although the New Jersey Palisades and the Hudson Highlands were admired for their beauty and featured in paintings of the Hudson River School, they were also viewed as a rich source of traprock (basalt) by quarrymen seeking to provide building material for the growth of nearby Manhattan Island. By the early 1900s development along the lower Hudson River had begun to destroy much of the area's natural beauty. A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... Palisades is also a general term for steep cliffs next to a river. ... Wind Gate, the northern entrance to the Hudson Highlands, as seen from Newburgh. ... Thomas Coles View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm, or The Oxbow, 1836 The Hudson River School was a mid-19th century American art movement by a group of landscape painters whose aesthetic vision was influenced by romanticism. ... For the cities, see Basalt, Colorado and Basalt, Idaho. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ...


Beginning in the 1890s, several unsuccessful efforts were made to turn much of the Highlands into a forest preserve. Fearing that they would soon be put out of business, quarry operators responded by working faster: in March, 1898 alone, more than three tons of dynamite was used to bring down Washington Head and Indian Head in Fort Lee, New Jersey producing several million cubic yards of traprock. The following year, work by the New Jersey Federation of Women's Clubs led to the creation of Palisades Interstate Park Commission, headed by George W. Perkins, which was authorized to acquire land between Fort Lee and Piermont, New York; its jurisdiction was extended to Stony Point in 1906. Dynamite is an explosive based on the explosive potential of nitroglycerin, initially using diatomaceous earth (kieselguhr) as an adsorbent. ... Map highlighting Fort Lees location within Bergen County. ... The Palisades Interstate Park Commission was formed in 1900 by governors Theodore Roosevelt of New York and Foster Voorhees of New Jersey in response to the destruction of the Palisades by quarry operators in the late 19th century. ... George Walbridge Perkins, Sr. ... Piermont is a village located in Rockland County, New York, United States. ... Stony Point is a town located in Rockland County, New York. ...


In 1908 the State of New York announced plans to relocate Sing Sing Prison to Bear Mountain. Work was begun on the area near Highland Lake (renamed Hessian Lake) and in January 1909, the state purchased the 740 acre (2.96 km²) Bear Mountain tract. Conservationists, inspired by the work of the Palisades Interstate Park Commission lobbied successfully for the creation of the Highlands of the Hudson Forest Preserve. However, the prison project was continued. State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Alternative meaning: Sing Sing (band) Sing Sing Correctional Facility is a prison in Ossining, New York. ... Bear Mountain is one of the best-known peaks of New Yorks Hudson Highlands. ... Conservationists are those people who tend to more highly rank the wise use of the Earths resources and ecosystems. ... The Palisades Interstate Park Commission was formed in 1900 by governors Theodore Roosevelt of New York and Foster Voorhees of New Jersey in response to the destruction of the Palisades by quarry operators in the late 19th century. ...


Mary Averell Harriman, whose husband, Union Pacific Railroad president E. H. Harriman died in September of that year, offered the state another 10,000 acres (40 km²) and one million dollars toward the creation of a state park. George W. Perkins, with whom she had been working, raised another $1.5 million from a dozen wealthy contributors including John D. Rockefeller and J. Pierpont Morgan. New York state appropriated a matching $2.5 million and the state of New Jersey appropriated $500,000 to build the Henry Hudson Drive, (which would be succeeded by the Palisades Interstate Parkway in 1947). Mary Williamson Averell Harriman Mary Williamson Averell (22 July 1851 - 7 November 1932) was born in New York City into a prominent New York family, she was tutored at home and completed her education at a finishing school with the “…expectation that one day she would become a fine wife... The Union Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting marks UP) (NYSE: UNP), headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska, is the largest railroad network in the United States. ... Edward Henry Harriman (February 20, 1848 – September 9, 1909), better known as E. H. Harriman, was a wealthy railroad executive. ... John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ... John Pierpont Morgan (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913), American financier and banker, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, a son of Junius Spencer Morgan (1813–1890), who was a partner of George Peabody and the founder of the house of J. S. Morgan & Co. ... The Palisades Interstate Parkway, officially known (but not signed) as New Jersey State Highway 445 and New York State Reference Route 987C is a four-lane, 42 mile (68 kilometre) long, wooded highway, generally built to freeway standards, extending from Fort Lee, New Jersey (at the George Washington Bridge, which...


Bear Mountain-Harriman State Park became a reality the following year when the prison was demolished and a dock built for steamboat excursion traffic; the following year a new West Shore Railroad station was built near the dock. In 1912, a replica of Henry Hudson's ship, the Half Moon was built and moored at the dock. Major William A. Welch was hired as Chief Engineer, whose work for the park would win him recognition as the father of the state park movement (and later, the national park movement). There is also a Harriman State Park in Idaho. ... For other uses, see Steamboat (disambiguation). ... No portrait of Hudson is known to be in existence. ... The Halve Maen (Half Moon) was the name of a Dutch East India Company yacht which sailed in what is now New York harbor on September 11, 1609. ... Major Williams Addams Welch (August 20, 1868 – May 4, 1941) was an American engineer and environmentalist who would have a major impact on the state and national park systems of the United States. ... State park is a term used in the United States and in Mexico for an area of land preserved on account of its natural beauty, historic interest, recreation, or other reason, and under the administration of the government of a U.S. state or one of the states of Mexico. ...


The park opened on July 5, 1913. Steamboats alone brought more than 22,000 passengers to the park that year. Camping at Hessian Lake (and later at Lake Stahahe) was immensely popular; the average stay was eight days and was a favorite for Boy Scouts. By 1914 it was estimated that than a million people a year were coming to the park. The Bear Mountain Inn was completed the following year; rooms were $4.50 and included three meals. is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... It has been suggested that Baiting Hollow Scout Camp be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Winter sports were added in 1922 and ski jumping was added in 1928. The latter drew big crowds as recently as the 1960s; on January 16, 1960, over 10,000 spectators turned out to watch the competition for the Doerr Memorial Cup. More jump competitions were held at Bear Mountain than at any other ski jump in the United States; however the ski jumps have not been used since 1990. A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter, usually a sport played on snow or ice. ... Ski jumping is a sport in which skiers go down an inrun with a take-off ramp (the jump), attempting to go as far as possible. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first section of the Appalachian Trail, taking hikers from Bear south to the Delaware Water Gap, opened on October 7, 1923 and served as a pattern for the other sections of the trail developed independently by local and regional organizations. The Bear Mountain Zoo, through which the Appalachian Trail passes, is the lowest elevation on the 2,100 mile (3400 km) trail. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail or simply The A.T., is a marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. ... The Delaware Water Gap is on the border of New Jersey and Pennsylvania where the Delaware River traverses a large ridge of the Appalachian Mountains. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the 1930s the federal government under Franklin D. Roosevelt was developing plans to preserve the environment as part of the Depression-era public works programs; the Civil Works Administration and the Works Progress Administration, spent five years on projects at the park. Pumphouses, reservoirs, sewer systems, vacation lodges, bathrooms, homes for park staff, storage buildings and an administration building were all created through these programs. Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... The Civil Works Administration was established by the New Deal during the Great Depression to create jobs for millions of the unemployed. ... WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Work Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 by Presidential order (Congress funded it annually but did not set it up). ... The Ashokan Reservoir, located in Ulster County, New York, USA. It is one of 19 that supplies New York City with drinking water. ... A sewer is an artificial conduit or system of conduits used to remove sewage (human liquid waste) and to provide drainage. ...


A scenic drive to the top of the mountain, called Perkins Memorial Drive, was constructed almost entirely by hand. Although powered construction equipment and newer easier-to-work-with building materials were available for use at the time, planners wanted the buildings constructed with the same principles and designs used to build the original lodge in 1915. Workers used stone, boulders and timber to construct the new buildings. Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Bear Mountain remains popular today, and welcomes more visitors annually than Yellowstone National Park, mainly due to its proximity to New York City. “Yellowstone” redirects here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


The park is referenced in the Bob Dylan song "Talkin' Bear Mountain Picnic Massacre Blues" This article is about the recording artist. ...


See also

This is a list of state parks in the U.S. state of New York. ...

References

  • Myles, William J., Harriman Trails, A Guide and History, The New York-New Jersey Trail Conference, New York, N.Y., 1999.

External links

  • Bear Mountain State Park
  • USGS GNIS: Bear Mountain State Park

Coordinates: 41.308° N 73.983° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

  • Bear Mountain State Park Railroad Photos (November 12, 2005)



  Results from FactBites:
 
New York State Parks :: Bear Mountain State Park (547 words)
Bear Mountain State Park is situated in rugged mountains rising from the west bank of the Hudson River.
The park features a large play field, shaded picnic groves, a dock on the Hudson for mooring small craft, lake and river fishing access, a swimming pool, a zoo and nature, hiking, biking and cross-country ski trails, and ski-jumps.
The Perkins Memorial Tower atop Bear Mountain affords spectacular views of the park, the Hudson Highlands and Harriman State Park.
Bear Mountain State Park (1002 words)
Nestled along the Hudson River, Bear Mountain was so-named because the profile of the mountain resembles a bear lying down.
Bear Mountain is open 365 days a year from 8 a.m.
Parking is $6, but the hiking trails and many special events are free.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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