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Encyclopedia > Bayonne
Commune of Bayonne

View of Grand Bayonne across the Adour
Location
Coordinates 43°29′37″N, 1°28′30″W
Administration
Country France
Région Aquitaine
Département Pyrénées-Atlantiques
(sous-préfecture)
Arrondissement Bayonne
Canton Chief town of 3 cantons
Intercommunality Communauté
d'agglomération de
Bayonne-Anglet-Biarritz
Mayor Jean Grenet
(2001-2008)
Statistics
Altitude 0 m–85 m
(avg. 4 m)
Land area¹ 21.68 km²
Population²
(July 1, 2004 estimate)
(March 8, 1999 census)

44,300
40,078
 - Density (2004) 2,043/km²
Miscellaneous
INSEE/Postal code 64 102/ 64100
¹ French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq. mi. or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
² Population sans doubles comptes: single count of residents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel).
France

Bayonne (French: Bayonne, pronounced /bajɔn/; Gascon Occitan and Basque: Baiona) is a city and commune of southwest France at the confluence of the Nive and Adour rivers, in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. Bayonne seen across the Adour Personal Photo, taken on 8 April 2004. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This is an alphabetical list of countries of the world, including both internationally recognized and generally unrecognized independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... France is divided into 26 régions: 21 of these are in the continental part of metropolitan France, one is Corse on the island of Corsica (although strictly speaking Corse is in fact a territorial collectivity, not a région, but is referred to as a région in common... Capital Bordeaux Land area¹ 41,309 km² Regional President Alain Rousset (PS) (since 1998) Population  - Jan. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to British counties. ... Pyrénées-Atlantiques (Gascon: Pirenèus-Atlantics; Basque: Pirinio-Atlantiarrak or Pirinio-Atlantikoak) is a département in the southwest of France which takes its name from the Pyrenees mountains and the Atlantic Ocean. ... Subprefecture is an administrative level that is below prefecture or province. ... The 100 French départements are divided into 342 arrondissements. ... The arrondissement of Bayonne is an arrondissement of France, located in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département, of the Aquitaine région. ... The canton is an administrative division of France. ... The commune is the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger,greater) is in modern times the title of the highest ranking municipal officer, who discharges certain judicial and administrative functions, in many systems an elected politician, who serves as chief executive and/or ceremonial official of many types of municipalities. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... INSEE is the French abbreviation for the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques). ... Postal codes were introduced in France in 1972, when La Poste introduced automated sorting. ... Estuaries and coastal waters are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing numerous ecological, economic, cultural, and aesthetic benefits. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ... The Gascon language is an Occitan dialect mostly spoken in Gascony (in the French départements of Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Hautes-Pyrénées, Landes, Gers, Gironde, a part of Lot-et-Garonne, a part of Haute-Garonne, and a part of Ariège), and in the small Spanish... Occitan, or langue doc is a Romance language characterized by its richness, variability, and by the intelligibility of its dialects. ... Basque (in Basque: Euskara) is the language spoken by the Basque people who inhabit the Pyrenees in North-Central Spain and the adjoining region of South-Western France. ... The commune is the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic. ... The Adour (Basque: Adur) is a river in southwestern France, rising in High-Bigorre (Pyrenees) and flowing into the Atlantic Ocean (Bay of Biscay) . It is 335 km long. ... Pyrénées-Atlantiques (Gascon: Pirenèus-Atlantics; Basque: Pirinio-Atlantiarrak or Pirinio-Atlantikoak) is a département in the southwest of France which takes its name from the Pyrenees mountains and the Atlantic Ocean. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to British counties. ... Subprefecture is an administrative level that is below prefecture or province. ...


Together with nearby Anglet, Biarritz, Saint-Jean-de-Luz, and several smaller communes, Bayonne forms an urban area with 178,965 inhabitants at the 1999 census, 40,078 of whom lived in the city of Bayonne proper (44,300 as of 2004 estimates). Anglet is a French commune situated in the department of Pyrénées-Atlantiques and the Aquitaine region. ... Tourist Office Hotel du Palais or Eugenie Palace La Grande Plage, the towns largest beach Biarritz is a town and commune which lies on the Bay of Biscay, on the Atlantic coast, in southwestern France. ... Saint-Jean-de-Luz (Basque Donibane Lohitzun) is a commune of the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département in France. ... An urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ...


The communes of Bayonne, Biarritz, and Anglet have joined into an intercommunal entity called the Communauté d'agglomération de Bayonne-Anglet-Biarritz. The commune is the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic. ...


Bayonne is the main town of Labourd in the French Basque Country. Labourd (Lapurdi in Basque; from Latin Lapurdum, Labort in Gascon) is a former French province and part of the present-day Pyrénées Atlantiques département. ... Basque Country flag Basque Country Northern Basque Country, French Basque Country or Continental Basque Country (French: Pays Basque, Basque: Iparralde) constitutes the Western part of the French department of the Pyrénées-Atlantiques. ...

Bayonne. View from the other side
Bayonne. View from the other side

Contents

Bayonne seen across the Adour Personal Photo, taken on 8 April 2004. ... Bayonne seen across the Adour Personal Photo, taken on 8 April 2004. ...

History

In the 3rd century AD, the area was the site of a Roman castrum, named Lapurdum. It was a military place, but not a port. In 840, the Vikings appeared before Lapurdum. In 842, they launched a large-scale inland offensive and settled outside the city on the river bank. Lapurdum was an oppidum and they needed a port. Their leader Björn eventually gave his name to this port. Björhamn became "Baionam" and finally "Baiona". Björnhamn became a key place on the route between the Adour and Ebro Rivers, which served as a kind of link between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean. This commercial route was the main goal of Danish invaders in France. By this route, they could easily reach Tortosa, which was the main marketplace in Europe dealing with slaves. // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first... The Roman Empire was a phase of the ancient Roman civilization characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... In the Roman Empire, a castra (the plural form of castrum, castri, a fortification) was a Roman military camp. ... Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 The Port of Wellington at night. ... Events After the death of Louis the Pious, his sons Lothar, Charles the Bald and Louis the German fight over the division of the empire, with Lothar succeeding as Emperor. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Events Oaths of Strasbourg — alliance of Louis the German and Charles the Bald against emperor Lothar — sworn and recorded in vernacular languages. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Tortosa (Latin Dertusa) is the capital of the comarca of Baix Ebre, in the province of Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, located at 12 metres above the sea, by the Ebre river. ...


By the 12th century, the city, now known as Bayonne, was an important port, with a mixed Basque and Gascon population. As part of Aquitaine, it was ruled by England between 1151 to 1452 and was a key commercial centre at the southern end of the English kingdom. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... The Basques are an indigenous people who inhabit parts of Spain and France. ... The Gascon language is an Occitan dialect mostly spoken in Gascony (in the French départements of Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Hautes-Pyrénées, Landes, Gers, Gironde, a part of Lot-et-Garonne, a part of Haute-Garonne, and a part of Ariège), and in the small Spanish... Capital Bordeaux Land area¹ 41,309 km² Regional President Alain Rousset (PS) (since 1998) Population  - Jan. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... Events Ghazni is burned by the princes of Ghur Geoffrey of Anjou dies, and succeeded by his son Henry, aged 18. ... Events October - English troops under John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, land in Guyenne, France, and retake most of the province without a fight. ...


Its importance waned somewhat when the French king, Charles VII, took the city at the end of the Hundred Years' War and the Adour changed course shortly afterwards, leaving Bayonne without its access to the sea. The French, however, realised Bayonne's strategic site near the Spanish border and in 1578 dug a canal to redirect the river through the city once again. Charles VII the Victorious, a. ... Combatants England Burgundy Brittany Portugal Navarre Flanders Hainault Aquitaine Luxembourg France Castile Scotland Genoa Majorca Bohemia Aragon The Hundred Years War was a conflict between England and France, lasting 116 years from 1337 to 1453. ... Events January 31 - Battle of Gemblours - Spanish forces under Don John of Austria and Alexander Farnese defeat the Dutch. ...


Bayonne endured numerous sieges from Plantagenet times until the end of the First French Empire in 1814. In the 17th century, Vauban built large fortifications and the Citadelle in and around the city. These proved crucial in 1813 and 1814, when Wellington's army besieged the city in the Napoleonic Wars, only taking it when they used a bridge of ships across the Adour to position artillery around the city. A siege is a military blockade and assault of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition. ... Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ... The First French Empire, commonly known as the French Empire or the Napoleonic Empire, covers the period of the domination of France and much of continental Europe by Napoleon I of France. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Sébastien Le Prestre, Seigneur de Vauban and later Marquis de Vauban (May 15, 1633 - March 30, 1707), commonly referred to as Vauban, was a Marshal of France and the foremost military engineer of his age, famed for both his skill to design fortifications and to break through them. ... This article is about a type of fortification. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Combatants Allies: • Great Britain (until 1801)/United Kingdom(from 1801) • Prussia • Austria • Sweden • Russia • Portugal • Spain • and others • France • Denmark-Norway • Poland Casualties Full list The Napoleonic Wars comprised a series of global conflicts fought during Napoleon Bonapartes rule over France (1799 - 1815). ...


Bayonne's location close to the border, but also within the Basque Country straddling both France and Spain, gave it an often privileged position in commerce. Basque sailors travelled the world, bringing back products such as cinnamon and riches from piracy and the whaling and cod trades. An armaments industry developed, giving the world the "bayonet". Jewish refugees from the Spanish Inquisition from 1560 brought new trades, most notably chocolate-making, which is still important in Bayonne. Spanish Basques also sought refuge in Bayonne in the 20th century during Francisco Franco's repression, with Petit Bayonne still a centre of Basque nationalism. Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch. ... Species Gadus morhua Gadus macrocephalus Gadus ogahvgfgvbc Cod surfacing This article is about codfish; for other meanings, see COD. Cod is the common name for the genus Gadus of fish, belonging to the family Gadidae, and is also used in the common name of a variety of other fishes. ... The US Marine Corps OKC-3S Bayonet A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife- or dagger-shaped weapon designed to fit on or over the muzzle of a rifle barrel or similar weapon. ... This article describes some ethnic, historic, and cultural aspects of the Jewish identity; for a consideration of the Jewish religion, refer to the article Judaism. ... Pedro Berruguete. ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Francisco El Caudillo Franco. ... The Gernika oak is a symbol of Basque freedoms. ...


By the mid-19th century, Bayonne had declined somewhat with the centralisation of power to Paris and to the new département capital, non-Basque Pau, after the 1789 French Revolution, and with Wellington's bombardment. However, rail links with Paris from 1854 and the growing touristic importance of nearby Biarritz brought industrialisation and development. Bayonne is now part of 'BAB' (Bayonne-Anglet-Biarritz), a metropolitan area of almost 200,000 people. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Part of the Paris skyline with from left to right: Montparnasse Tower, Eiffel Tower, and in the background, towers of neighboring La Défense. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to British counties. ... Château de Pau Pau is a town of southwestern France, préfecture (capital) of the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The French Revolution (1789–1799) was a pivotal period in the history of French, European and Western civilization. ... Part of the Paris skyline with from left to right: Montparnasse Tower, Eiffel Tower, and in the background, towers of neighboring La Défense. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Description

Cathedral Nôtre-Dame
Cathedral Nôtre-Dame

The Nive divides Bayonne into Grand Bayonne and Petit Bayonne, with five bridges between the two, both quarters still backed by Vauban's walls. Indeed the Nive is more like a main street, with many restaurants, squares and the covered market on its quays. The houses lining the Nive are picturesque examples of Basque architecture, with half-timbering and shutters in the national colours of red and green. The much wider Adour is to the north. The Pont St-Esprit connects Petit Bayonne with the Quartier St-Esprit across the Adour, where the massive Citadelle and the railway station are located. Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 2440 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 2440 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Grand Bayonne is the commercial and civic hub, with small pedestrianised streets packed with shops, plus the cathedral and Hôtel de Ville. The Cathédrale Ste-Marie is an imposing, elegant Gothic building, rising over the houses, glimpsed along the narrow streets. It was constructed in the 12th and 13th centuries. The south tower was completed in the 16th century but the cathedral was only completed in the 19th century with the north tower. The cathedral is noted for its charming cloisters. There are other details and sculptures of note, although much was destroyed in the Revolution. Nearby is the Château-Vieux, some of which dates back to the 12th century, where the governors of the city were based, including the English Black Prince. A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Anglican, Catholic and some Lutheran churches, which serves as the central church of a diocese, and thus as a bishops seat. ... In French, a hôtel de ville or mairie is a town hall (and not a hotel). ... See also Gothic art. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A cloister (from latin claustrum) is a part of cathedral, monastic and abbey architecture. ... Edward the Black Prince - illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902 Effigy on the Black Princes tomb in Canterbury Cathedral Edward, Prince of Wales, known as the Black Prince (June 15, 1330 - June 8, 1376) was the eldest son of King Edward III of England. ...


Petit Bayonne is lively with Basque bars and restaurants more reminiscent of cities the other side of the Pyrenees. There are two important museums here. The Musée Basque is the finest ethnographic museum of the entire Basque Country. It opened in 1922 but has been closed for a decade recently for refurbishment. It now has special exhibitions on Basque agriculture, seafaring and pelota, handicrafts and Basque history and way of life. The Musée Bonnat began with a large collection bequeathed by the local-born painter Léon Bonnat. The museum is one of the best galleries in south west France and has paintings by Degas, El Greco, Botticelli and Goya among others. At the back of Petit-Bayonne is the Château-Neuf, among the ramparts. Now an exhibition space, it was started by the newly-arrived French in 1460 to control the city. The walls nearby have been opened to visitors. They are important for plantlife now and Bayonne's botanic gardens adjoin the walls on both sides of the Nive. 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Pelota Vasca or Pelota Valenciana (in Spanish; pilota in Basque, Valenciano and Catalan; pelote in French, from Latin pila) is a name for a variety of court sports played with a ball using ones hand, a racket, a wooden bat (pala), or a basket propulsor, against a wall (front... Léon Joseph Florentin Bonnat (20 June 1833 - 1922) was a French painter. ... Edgar Degas Edgar Degas (19 July 1834 – 27 September 1917) was a French artist famous for his work in painting, sculpture, and drawing. ... Self portrait. ... Alleged self-portrait of Botticelli, in his Adoration of the Magi. ... Goyas self-portrait Goya redirects here. ... Events The first Portuguese navigators reach the coast of modern Sierra Leone. ...


The area across the Adour is largely residential and industrial, with much demolished to make way for the railway. The St-Esprit church was part of a bigger complex built by Louis XI to care for pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela. It has an attractive wooden Flight into Egypt sculpture. Overlooking the quarter is Vauban's 1680 Citadelle. The soldiers of Wellington's army who died besieging the citadelle in 1813 are buried in the nearby English Cemetery, visited by Queen Victoria and other British dignitaries when staying in Biarritz. The distillary of the famous local liqueur, Izarra, is on the northern bank of the Adour and is open to visitors. Louis XI the Prudent (French: Louis XI le Prudent) (July 3, 1423 – August 30, 1483), also informally nicknamed luniverselle aragne (old French for universal spider), or the Spider King, was King of France (1461–1483). ... St James the Moor Slayer. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... Hi my name is TOOD is it alright if i kiss your a** now For the Public House in EastEnders see The Queen Victoria. ... Izarra is a sweet liqueur made in Bayonne in the French Basque Country. ...


Culture and sport

Bayonne has the longest tradition of bull-fighting in France and there is a ring beyond the walls of Grand Bayonne. The season runs between July and September. Bull-fighting is a major part of the five-day Fêtes de Bayonne which starts on the first Wednesday of August and attracts people from across the Basque Country and beyond. Parades, music, dance, fireworks, food and drink all feature in the celebrations. Soon after the Assumption festival of 15 August heralds a few more days of bull-fights. Bull attacking a matador Bullfighting or tauromachy (Spanish toreo, corrida de toros or tauromaquia; Portuguese corrida de touros or tauromaquia) is a blood sport that involves, most of the times, professional performers (matadores) who execute various formal moves with the goal of appearing graceful and confident, while masterful over the... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ...


There are also important festivals of Jazz (July), Bayonne ham (Holy Week), theatre and pelota (the Basque sport). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Pelota Vasca or Pelota Valenciana (in Spanish; pilota in Basque, Valenciano and Catalan; pelote in French, from Latin pila) is a name for a variety of court sports played with a ball using ones hand, a racket, a wooden bat (pala), or a basket propulsor, against a wall (front...


Aviron Bayonnais is the city's rugby union club, founded in 1904 and French champions three times, in 1913, 1934 and 1943. The local football team is Aviron Bayonnais FC. Aviron Bayonnais is a French rugby union club from Bayonne in Pyrénées-Atlantiques that currently competes in the top level of the French league system. ... A scrum Rugby union (often referred to as rugby, union or football) is one of the two codes of rugby football, the other being rugby league. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Economy and products

Bayonne is known for its fine chocolates, produced in the town for 500 years, and Bayonne ham, a cured ham seasoned with peppers from nearby Espelette. Izarra, the liqueur made in bright green or yellow colours, is distilled locally. It is said by some that Bayonne is the birthplace of mayonnaise, supposedly a corruption of Bayonnaise, the French adjective describing the city's people and produce. Now bayonnaise can refer to a particular mayonnaise flavoured with the Espelette chillis. Traditional Espelette house with peppers drying on the walls Espelette (Basque: Ezpeleta) is a commune and small village in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département (64), Aquitaine, in south west France, formerly in the traditional Basque province of Labourd. ... Izarra is a sweet liqueur made in Bayonne in the French Basque Country. ... Mayonnaise is a thick, creamy sauce, usually of a white or light yellow color. ...


Bayonne is now the centre of certain craft industries that were once widespread, including the manufacture of makilas, traditional Basque walking-sticks. The Fabrique Alza just outside the city is known for its palas, bats used in pelota, the traditional Basque sport. Pelota Vasca or Pelota Valenciana (in Spanish; pilota in Basque, Valenciano and Catalan; pelote in French, from Latin pila) is a name for a variety of court sports played with a ball using ones hand, a racket, a wooden bat (pala), or a basket propulsor, against a wall (front...


As of 1935, its chief industries were shipbuilding, tanning, and pottery. In the late 20th century, the processing of by-products from the Lacq natural gas field near Pau became important, although Bayonne has had higher-than-average unemployment. Metallurgy also provides local jobs. Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... Tanning is the process of making leather from skin. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Natural gas is commonly referred to as gas. ... Metallurgy is a domain of materials science and of materials engineering that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their intermetallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. ...


Communications

Bayonne is on the high-speed TGV line between Paris and Hendaye for connections with Spain. In practice, the line slows considerably beyond Bordeaux although there are plans to improve the service. There are regional rail services along the Basque coast, to Pau and through the Landes to Dax and Bordeaux. There is a line along the Nive valley through Labourd and Nafarroa Beherea to St-Jean-Pied-de-Port, used principally by tourists and hikers. This article is about the French high-speed railway system. ... Hendaye (Basque Hendaia) is the most southwesterly town in France. ... New city flag (traditional tri-crescent) City coat of arms Motto: The fleur-de-lis alone rules over the moon, the waves, the castle, and the lion Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Aquitaine Département Gironde (33) Mayor Alain Juppé (UMP) (since 2006) Intercommunality... Landes is a département in southern France. ... DAX chart in the Frankfurt Stock Exchange DAX (abbreviation of Deutscher Aktienindex (German Stock Index )) is a Blue Chip stock market index consisting of the 30 major German companies trading on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. ... Basse-Navarre (Nafarroa Beherea in Basque) is a former French province, part of the present day Pyrénées Atlantiques département. ... Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port (Basque: Donibane Garazi) is a commune in the French département of Pyrénées-Atlantiques. ...


There are extensive bus connections with Biarritz, Anglet and surrounding villages. The city is near the intersection between the A63 Autoroute between Bordeaux and the Spanish border and the A64 from Bayonne to Toulouse. Autoroute is a French word meaning, literally, a motor road, and corresponding to the words motorway or freeway in English. ... The Capitole, the 18th century city hall of Toulouse and best known landmark in the city; in the foreground is the Place du Capitole, a hub of urban life at the very center of the city Toulouse (pronounced in standard French, and in local Toulouse accent) (Occitan: Tolosa, pronounced ) is...


Bayonne has airport Aéroport de Biarritz-Anglet-Bayonne, its 6 km away from the city towards Anglet .Its just opposite of N10 road. It's a joined airport with Biarritz and Anglet with flights to destinations across France as well Europe. Anglet is a French commune situated in the department of Pyrénées-Atlantiques and the Aquitaine region. ... Tourist Office Hotel du Palais or Eugenie Palace La Grande Plage, the towns largest beach Biarritz is a town and commune which lies on the Bay of Biscay, on the Atlantic coast, in southwestern France. ... Anglet is a French commune situated in the department of Pyrénées-Atlantiques and the Aquitaine region. ... World map showing Europe Political map (neighboring countries in Asia and Africa also shown) Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ...


Famous residents

Bayonne was the birthplace of:

Dominique Joseph Garat (September 8, 1749 - April 25, 1833) was a French writer and politician. ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... François Cabarrus (1752-1810) was a French adventurer and Spanish financier. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... François Gérards Portrait de Madame Tallien, 1804 Thérésa Tallien (July 31, 1773 - January 15, 1835) was a figure of the French Revolution. ... Jacques Laffitte, French politician Jacques Laffitte (October 24, 1767–May 26, 1844), was a French banker and politician. ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Frédéric Bastiat Claude Frédéric Bastiat (June 30, 1801–December 24, 1850) was a French classical liberal theorist, political economist, and member of the French assembly. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Classical liberalism (also called laissez-faire liberalism[1]) is a term used to describe the following: the philosophy developed by early liberals from the Age of Enlightenment until John Stuart Mill and revived in the 20th century by Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman. ... An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... Political economy was the original term for the study of production, the acts of buying and selling, and their relationships to laws, customs and government. ... Léon Joseph Florentin Bonnat (20 June 1833 - 1922) was a French painter. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Memorial for Cassin in Forbach/France René Samuel Cassin (5 October 1887 – 20 February 1976) was a French jurist and judge. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... A judge or justice is an official who presides over a court. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequested by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Michel Camdessus (born May 1, 1933) was Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) from January 16, 1987 to February 14, 2000. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an international organization that oversees the global financial system by observing exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering financial and technical assistance when requested. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Didier Deschamps (born 15 October 1968 in Bayonne) is a former French football player who captained France to victories in the 1998 World Cup and Euro 2000. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The FIFA World Cup Trophy, which has been awarded to the world champions since 1974. ... Imanol Harinordoquy (born 20 February 1980 in Bayonne) is a French rugby union player who typically plays as a number 8 for France internationally and Biarritz at club level. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... The France national rugby union team are also known as les Bleus or les Tricolores. ... A scrum Rugby union (often referred to as rugby, union or football) is one of the two codes of rugby football, the other being rugby league. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ...

Civic information

The Mayor of Bayonne (1995-2007) is Jean Grenet of the centre-right UMP. The 39-strong town council is also dominated by the UMP, who hold 31 of the seats. The centre-left group has five seats, the Basque nationalist Baiona Berria have two and the communist LCR one. The Union for a Popular Movement (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire), initially named the Union for the Presidential Majority (Union pour la Majorité Présidentielle), and more usually known from its French acronym as simply the UMP, is the main French conservative political party of the right-wing. ... The Revolutionary Communist League (Ligue Communiste Révolutionnaire) (LCR) is a French Trotskyist political party. ...


Bayonne's twin towns are:

Pamplona (Basque: Iruñea or Iruña) is the capital city of Navarre, Spain. ... Navarra is the Spanish name for Navarre (Basque: Nafarroa), an ancient kingdom in the Pyrenees, and now a province and an autonomous community in Spain. ... A Daytona Beach Bar The worlds most famous beach Daytona Beach is a city located in Volusia County, Florida, USA. As of 2004, the population estimates recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 64,422. ... Seal of Bayonne Bayonne is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Bayonne
  • City council website (in French)
  • Visiting Bayonne (tourist map, guide and photos) In English
  • Webpage about the citadel and fortifications of the town
  • BAIONA in the Bernardo Estornés Lasa - Auñamendi Encyclopedia (Euskomedia Fundazioa) (in Spanish)
  • Fiestas Songs (in French)


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

 
Municipalities in Labourd (Lapurdi)
 
Official name in French (name in Basque, if different)
Coat of Labourd
Ahetze | Ainhoa | Anglet (Angelu) | Arbonne (Arbona)| Arcangues (Arrangoitze)| Ascain (Azkaine) | Bardos (Bardoze) | Bassussarry (Basusarri) | Bayonne (Baiona) | Biarritz (Miarritze) | Bidart (Bidarte) | Biriatou (Biriatu) | Bonloc (Lekuine) | Boucau (Bokale) | Briscous (Beskoitze) | Cambo-les-Bains (Kanbo) | Ciboure (Ziburu) | Espelette (Ezpeleta) | Guéthary (Getaria) | Guiche (Gixune) | Halsou (Haltsu) | Hasparren (Hazparne) | Hendaye (Hendaia) | Itxassou (Itsasu) | Jatxou (Jatsu) | Lahonce (Lehuntze) | Larressore (Larresoro) | Louhossoa (Luhuso) | Macaye(Makea) | Mendionde (Lekorne) | Mouguerre (Mugerre) | Saint-Jean-de-Luz (Donibane Lohizune) | Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle (Senpere) | Saint-Pierre-d'Irube (Hiriburu) | Sare (Sara) | Souraïde (Zuraide) | Urcuit (Urketa) | Urrugne (Urruña) | Urt (Ahurti) | Ustaritz (Uztaritze) | Villefranque (Milafranga)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Main Page - GNU Telephony (618 words)
GNU Telephony is used to directly support the GNU Common C++ family of libraries and telephony application servers such as GNU Bayonne, which are part of the GNU Project, as well as other packages that we regularly use.
GNU Bayonne is the telephony server of GNU Telephony and the GNU Project.
The stable release is GNU Bayonne 2, the current release series is 1.5.x, and currently supports SIP, H.323, and Voicetronix drivers.
Bayonne, France - LoveToKnow 1911 (858 words)
Grand Bayonne lies on the left bank of the Nive; the two squares which lie close together at the mouth of that river constitute the most animated quarter of the town.
Bayonne is the seat of a bishopric and of a subprefect; it has tribunals of first instance and of commerce, a chamber of commerce, a lycee, a school of music, a library, an art museum with a large collection of the works of the painter Leon Bonnat, and a branch of the Bank of France.
The port consists of an outer harbour, the so-called "rade" (roadstead) and the port proper, and occupies the course of the Adour from its mouth, which is obstructed by a shifting bar, to the Pont St Esprit, and the course of the Nive as far as the Pont Mayou.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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