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Encyclopedia > Batwoman
Batwoman


Batwoman, as seen on the cover to 52 #11. Art by J.G. Jones. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... J. G. Jones is an American Comic Book artist. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance Historical:
Detective Comics #233 (July 1956)
Modern:
52 #9 (July 2006, cameo)
52 #11 (July 2006, full-app.)
Created by Bob Kane, Sheldon Moldoff
Characteristics
Alter ego Katherine "Kate" Kane
Abilities Trained martial artist, access to high tech equipment.

Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics' popular superhero Batman. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... Sheldon Shelly Moldoff (born April 14, 1920, New York City, New York) is an American comic book artist best known for co-creating such DC Comics characters as Hawkgirl and Poison Ivy, and as one of Bob Kanes primary ghost artists (uncredited collaborators) on the superhero Batman. ... High tech refers to high technology, technology that is at the cutting-edge and the most advanced currently available. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode, see Super Hero (Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


Originally named Katherine "Kathy" Kane, the character was introduced as a love interest for Batman, to prove he was not gay in response to the backlash from the book Seduction of the Innocent. Although Batwoman made a number of appearances during the the late 50's and early 60's, her popularity steadily declined[citation needed] until she officially retired. GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... First U.S. printing, 1954 First U.K. printing, 1954 Seduction of the Innocent was a book by Dr. Fredric Wertham, published in 1954, that warned that comic books were a bad form of popular literature and a serious cause of juvenile delinquency. ...


The most recent incarnation of the character, Kate Kane, appears in the series 52, operating in Gotham City during Batman's absence following the events of Infinite Crisis. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ...


Alex Ross, who designed her modern costume[1], and Paul Dini initially planned for Barbara Gordon, the former Batgirl, to don the cape and cowl once again as the new Batwoman. However, since Barbara serves as the only disabled superhero of DC comics as Oracle, the editors decided to revitalize the original character instead. Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... Paul Dini is an American television producer of animated cartoons. ... Barbara Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ...

Contents

Kathy Kane

Pre-Crisis

The original Batwoman is primarily associated with the Silver Age of comic books. She first appeared in Detective Comics #233 (July 1956).[1] She was a costumed crime-fighter like Batman, his counterpart in many ways. For example, while Batman wears a utility belt, Batwoman carried a utility purse. Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Purses, such as this one by Burberry, are fashion accessories with a function. ...

Detective Comics #233 (July 1956) Batwoman's first appearance.
Detective Comics #233 (July 1956) Batwoman's first appearance.

In the aftermath of the attacks on comics in the early 1950s, "The Batwoman" was the first of several characters that would make up the "Batman Family". Since the "family" formula had proven very successful, editor Jack Schiff suggested to Kane that he create one for The Batman. A female was chosen first, to offset the charges made by Frederick Wertham that Batman and Robin were homosexuals.[2] Batman creator Bob Kane later claimed that he originally drew her to resemble his first wife. The fact that he named her "Kathy Kane" supports this statement; however, Kane used "ghost pencillers" such as Sheldon Moldoff and Dick Sprang to draw most Batman comics in the 1950s, and the question of how much input Kane actually had to the Batman stories is disputed.[citations needed] Detective Comics #233 (July 1956). ... Detective Comics #233 (July 1956). ... Dr. Fredric Wertham (March 20, 1895–November 29, 1981) was a German-American psychiatrist and crusading author who protested the purportedly harmful effects of mass media—comic books in particular—on the development of children. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... Sheldon Shelly Moldoff (born April 14, 1920, New York City, New York) is an American comic book artist best known for co-creating such DC Comics characters as Hawkgirl and Poison Ivy, and as one of Bob Kanes primary ghost artists (uncredited collaborators) on the superhero Batman. ... Richard Dick Sprang (b. ...


Batwoman guest-starred occasionally in Batman stories published from 1956 to 1964. Batman wished for Kathy to retire from crimefighting due to the danger. Nevertheless, she remained his ally (even when she temporarily became a new version of Catwoman). Catwoman (real name Selina Kyle) is a DC Comics character, associated with the Batman franchise. ...


In 1961, Batwoman was joined by her niece Betty Kane, the Bat-Girl, named after Bob Kane's wife. Kathy and Betty were romantically interested in Batman and Robin, respectively. Robin seemed to return Bat-Girl's affection, while Batman remained aloof. Bette Kane is a fictional character in DC comics. ... Robin is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ...


In 1964, DC dropped Batwoman, as well as Bat-Girl, Ace the Bat-Hound, and Bat-Mite from the Batman titles, which were undergoing a revamp under Editor Julius Schwartz that eliminated many of the "sci-fi" elements that were introduced in the 1950s . In stories published during the next few years, Batwoman makes several appearances in the Batman-Superman team-up book World's Finest, which was edited by Mort Weisinger. Aces first appearance in Batman #92, June 1955 The comic book character Ace the Bat-Hound was the canine crime-fighting partner of Batman and Robin in DC Comics of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Bat-Mite, astride Ace the Bat-Hound, on the cover of Batman #133 (August 1960). ... Julius Schwartz, editor for DC Comics Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 - February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Worlds Finest Comics was a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1941 to 1986. ... Mortimer Weisinger (1915-1978) was an American magazine and comic book editor. ...


In the 1970s, Batwoman only appeared a few times, often fighting crime alongside the second Batgirl, Barbara Gordon. During her retirement, she becomes the owner of a circus, which she kept until she died. She is killed by the League of Assassins and the brainwashed Bronze Tiger in Detective Comics #485 (September 1979). Barbara Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media. ... The Big Top of Billy Smarts Circus Cambridge 2004. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bronze Tiger (Ben Turner) is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...


There was also a Batwoman on Earth-Two, who was very much like her deceased Earth-One counterpart. This Kathy Kane retired when the Batman of that world married Catwoman. She married and had children, but her husband was never revealed. She came out of retirement following Batman's death when Gotham City was threatened by the return of Hugo Strange. The Earths of the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each one. ... Catwoman is a fictional character associated with DC Comics Batman franchise and created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... Hugo Strange is a fictional character in DC Comics, a nemesis of Batman. ...


Post-Crisis

After Crisis on Infinite Earths altered DC Universe history, Batwoman's and Bat-Girl's histories are heavily changed. In the new continuity, Kathy Kane exists but apparently Batwoman never had. Bat-Girl never existed either, but a superheroine named Flamebird was introduced who had a somewhat similar costume and almost the same name ("Bette Kane"). Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bette Kane is a fictional character in DC comics. ...

Batman encounters a vision of Kathy Kane, in The Kingdom: Planet Krypton #1. Art by Barry Kitson.

The late Kathy Kane and her murder by the Bronze Tiger were mentioned on occasion. Kathy Kane existed but was never Batwoman in the post-Crisis DC Universe. In Batman, Dark Detective #2 (2005), a large portrait of Batwoman appeared on the wall of Batcave, although it is likely that Batman: Dark Detective does not take place in current DC continuity. In the Beast Boy miniseries, Flamebird tries to post bail for Beast Boy, with money "borrowed from Aunt Kathy", which would suggest she is still alive. In Alan Moore's The Killing Joke, Batman stares at a photograph that portrays Bat-Girl (Bette Kane), Batwoman, Ace the Bat-hound, and Batmite -- characters that did not exist in continuity at the time. Image File history File links Batwoman. ... Image File history File links Batwoman. ... Barry Kitson is an artist best known as a Penciler of major superhero comicbooks published by Marvel and DC. His first professional work was Spider-Man for Marvel UK. He also drew the first 2000AD Judge Dredd comicbook written by Grant Morrison. ... Bronze Tiger (Ben Turner) is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Beast Boy (real name Garfield Mark Gar Logan) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a shapeshifting superhero who is a former member of the Doom Patrol and member of the Teen Titans. ... Cover to Batman: The Killing Joke. ... Bat-Mite, astride Ace the Bat-Hound, on the cover of Batman #133 (August 1960). ...


In 52, the new Batwoman - Kate Kane, is referred to as "Katherine the younger", indicating that an older Katherine Kane exists and lives post-Infinite Crisis. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ...


The Kingdom

Batwoman is referenced in Planet Krypton, an issue within the The Kingdom miniseries. This series introduces the concept of Hypertime, in which characters who had been removed from continuity still exist in alternate timelines. A Planet Krypton theme restaurant (modeled after Planet Hollywood) finds itself "haunted" by silent "Hypertime ghosts" of characters who are no longer part of DC continuity. Batman comes face to face with Batwoman and says, "Kathy?" Later, Batman says there is no possible way he could know her. The Kingdom was the title for a two issue miniseries published by DC Comics in 1999, and the story title of a story which extended into one-shot books entitled Gog, The Kingdom: Kid Flash, The Kingdom: Nightstar, The Kingdom: Offspring, The Kingdom: Planet Krypton, and The Kingdom: Son of... Hypertime is a fictional concept presented in the 1998 comic book series The Kingdom, both a catch-all explanation for any continuity discrepancies in DC Universe stories and a variation or superset of the Multiverse that existed before Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Planet Hollywood at night, Downtown Disney, Florida, USA. Planet Hollywood Niagara Falls, Ontario Planet Hollywood, a theme restaurant chain inspired by the popular portrayal of Hollywood, was launched in New York on October 22, 1991, with the backing of Hollywood stars Sylvester Stallone, Bruce Willis, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Demi Moore. ...


Kate Kane

Fictional character biography

52

See also: 52 (comic book)

After the Infinite Crisis series, a new Katherine "Kate" Kane is introduced. Kate is Renee Montoya's former lover and heiress to one of the wealthiest families in Gotham City, owning that which the Wayne family does not.[3] Renee refers to her as "Katherine the younger" and asks Kate to help find the connection between the Kanes and the address 520 Kane Street. While still upset from their breakup, Kate agrees to help Renee, but punches her after Renee mentions their prior relationship. Renee suggests they once loved each other, and Kate tells her to leave. Not long after that, Batwoman is shown to be observing Montoya from the rooftops as Renee converses with the Question (in his guise as "Charlie") in an alley. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Renee Montoya is a fictional character in DC Comics. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ...


Kate meets with Renee and Charlie in Gotham Park and confirms that the warehouse was being leased by Ridge-Ferrick until six weeks ago. Renee refuses to tell Kate what's going on saying that she doesn't owe Kate anything, which shocks Kate and prompts her to tail them as Batwoman. When Renee and the Question break into Ridge-Ferrick's Gotham offices, they are attacked by Whisper A'Daire's shapeshifting minions, and Batwoman arrives to rescue them. Making quick work of two monsters, Batwoman stops Renee from shooting the third, instead kicking the monster out a window. Batwoman informs them the police are coming, asks that she not be mentioned, and leaves. Whisper ADaire is a fictional villian in DC Comics, first appearing in Detective Comics #743. ...


After Renee learns that the Book of Crime, a sacred text of Intergang, contains a prophecy foretelling the brutal murder of the "twice named daughter of Kane,"[4] she and the Question return to Gotham. They contact Kate by flashing a batsignal, and the three join forces to avert Intergang's plans.[5] As Kate continues the case, she is joined by Nightwing, who has recently returned to Gotham and becomes infatuated with her. On Christmas Eve, he gives her an 'official' Batarang. She also celebrates Hanukkah with Renee, and the two kiss shortly before Christmas. Intergang is a fictional organized crime organization in Superman comics. ... Nightwing is a name used by at least six fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe. ... Grand Rabbi Israel Abraham Portugal of the Hasidic group Skullen lighting Hanukkah lights Hanukkah (‎, also spelled Chanukah), also known as the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day Jewish holiday beginning on the 25th day of the month of Kislev, which may fall anytime from late November to late December. ...


Intergang realizes that the image of Batwoman in the Crime Bible and the cited "twice-named daughter of Cain" were one and the same, and ransack Kate's apartment, kidnapping her with the intention to sacrifice her. Renee finds her, seemingly too late to save her, as during the fight, Kate pulls the knife out of her own chest to stab Bruno Mannheim and then collapses in Renee's arms. Kate survives her wounds after Renee stops the bleeding in time, however, and as she recuperates in her Penthouse, Renee, dressed as the Question, shines the batsignal into her apartment and asks "Are you ready?" Bruno Ugly Mannheim is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics as one of Supermans enemies. ...


One Year Later

One year after the start of 52, the Penguin suggests Batman bring a date to the opening of his club, asking, "Why don't you bring that new Batwoman? I hear she's kind of hot."[6] One Year Later event logo. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an archenemy of Batman. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


Batwoman later appears in a story written by Greg Rucka for the DC Infinite Holiday Special.[7] This story fleshed out some of the current Batwoman's background, including the fact that she is Jewish.


Batwoman has most recently appeared in Countdown 39. She appears after Renee Montoya confronts Trickster and Pied Piper, having trailed them from Penguin's Iceburg Lounge nightclub. Countdown is a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 9, 2007, directly following the conclusion of the last issue of 52. ... Renee Montoya is a fictional character in DC Comics. ... The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash. ... Pied Piper (real name: Hartley Rathaway) is a fictional former supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an archenemy of Batman. ...


Skills, resources, and abilities

As Batwoman, Kate lacks any superpowers, and instead relies on her martial artistry and Batman-inspired equipment when fighting crime. In the ten years since her breakup with Renee Montoya, she has learned to fight and is able to defeat three monsters, as well as spy on Renee and the Question with relative ease. Superhero fiction invariably features characters with superhuman, supernatural and/or paranormal abilities, often referred to as superpowers, also spelled super-powers. Below is a list of many of those that have been known to be used. ... Renee Montoya is a fictional character in DC Comics. ...


Being the heiress of a family whose fortune is comparable to the Waynes, Kate possesses the finances to produce an arsenal of equipment, similar to Batman. This includes a baton-like device which can extend from the center in length and has Bat-shaped attachments at each end.[8] She also makes use of Batarangs and a Batman-like grappling hook. Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... It has been suggested that some sections of this article be split into a new article entitled Club (law enforcement). ... Batman surrounded by batarangs. ... A soilder loading the hook. ...


Personal life

Unlike the Silver Age Kathy Kane, who was written as being romantically attracted to Batman, the new version of Kane is written as a "lipstick lesbian." In a bit of self-promoting media-baiting, her homosexuality was announced at the same time as the character was revealed in the spring of 2006.[9] Stories appeared on television news outlets such as CNN, general news magazines such as "USA Today", and gay culture magazines such as Out.[10] While many LGBT characters in comics are public[citation needed] with their sexual orientation, Kane is an example of a closet homosexual; one who makes a conscious effort to conceal her sexuality by any means. Renee Montoya, Kane's former lover, hinted during 52 that Kate's inhibitions were the reason behind their break-up. Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... See labrys, black triangle. ... Out is a popular gay magazine that focuses mainly on gay and lesbian fashion and upscale culture. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The expression being in the closet has been used to describe keeping secret ones sexual behavior or orientation, most commonly homosexuality or bisexuality, but also including the gender identity of transgender and transsexual people. ...


In her civilian identity as a socialite, she is acquainted with Bruce Wayne and is friends with a doctor named Mallory, who treats the Question's cancer and later Kate's stab wound. Kate is also Jewish, and celebrated Hanukkah with Renee during the events of 52. Her familial relationships are unknown. It is unconfirmed whether or not Kate Kane is related to the New Earth versions of Kathy Kane and Bette "Flamebird" Kane, although in 52 Montoya alludes to there being an older Katherine Kane in Kate's family. For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Bette Kane is a fictional character in DC comics. ...


Other characters named Batwoman

In the Teen Titans storyline "Titans Tomorrow", Bette Kane is Batwoman, and wears a costume similar to Kathy's pre-Crisis one. Teen Titans redirects here. ... Teen Titans: The Future is Now by Mike McKone. ...


In Mark Waid and Alex Ross's Kingdom Come limited series, a Batwoman character is portrayed as a Batman admirer from Jack Kirby's Fourth World. Her costume mixed Kirby-esque elements with those of the original costume. The character rode a giant bat-winged dog named Ace. Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... Kingdom Come was a four-issue comic book limited series published in 1996 by DC Comics. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds of others stretching...


In Alan Davis's "Elseworlds" tale:JLA: The Nail, Selina Kyle wears a Batwoman costume that looks very similar to the costume worn by Kathy Kane . In the sequel JLA: Another Nail, she fashions her own Batwoman persona. Alan Davis (born 1956) is a British writer and artist of comic books. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cover of Catwoman #2, February 2002. ...


Helena Wayne appears as Batwoman in an alternate Earth where the genders of Superman, Batman and other heroes are reversed.[11] Batwoman's closest ally is Superwoman. Superwoman is the name given to several fictional characters published over the years by DC Comics, most of them being, much like the more popular Supergirl, a woman with powers similar to Supermans. ...


In Batman: Dark Knight Dynasty, President Brenna Wayne becomes Batwoman in order to stop Vandal Savage.


Appearances in other media

Batwoman from Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman.

Batwoman appeared in the direct to video animated film Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman. This version is actually three different women: Gotham Police Detective Sonia Alcana (voiced by Elisa Gabrielli), Dr. Roxanne 'Rocky' Ballantine (Kelly Ripa), and Kathleen 'Kathy' Duquesne (Kimberly Brooks). (Kathy Duquesne (pronounced "du-kane") is a homage to Kathy Kane. The creators wanted to use the name Kathy Kane, but DC Comics made them change it because Batwoman acts somewhat like a villain.) The disguised voice of the Batwoman is provided by Kyra Sedgwick. Image File history File links Cover to Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman. ... Image File history File links Cover to Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman. ... A film that is released direct-to-video (also known as made-for-video, straight-to-video and, more recently, straight-to-DVD) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats (historically VHS) before or without being released in movie theaters or broadcast on television. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman is an animated movie based on the DC Comics character Batman and set in the same world as Batman: The Animated Series. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kelly Maria Ripa (born October 2, 1970, in Berlin, New Jersey) an American Daytime Emmy Award-winning actress and talk show host. ... Kimberly Brooks Kimberly Brooks (sometimes credited as Kimberly Moss) is an American actress on television, film, video games and theatre. ... Kyra Sedgwick (born August 19, 1965)[1] is an Emmy-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress. ...


The three women team up to avenge wrongs by the Penguin, Rupert Thorne and Carlton Duquesne (Kathy's father), each taking on the identity to avoid connection with any one individual. Detective Alcana wants retribution on Rupert Thorne after he burned down her parents' shop when she was a child and ruined her family's lives. Dr. Ballantine's goal is to clear her fiancé's name after he was framed by the Penguin for gun smuggling. Finally, Kathy wants her father Carlton Duquesne's criminal career to end because it led to the death of her mother. Detective Alcana met Dr. Ballantine when they were in college, and Kathy Duquene on an art class. The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an archenemy of Batman. ... Rupert Thorne is a fictional character in the Batman universe, created by Steve Englehart and Walter Simonson in Detective Comics #469. ... Rupert Thorne is a fictional character in the Batman universe, created by Steve Englehart and Walter Simonson in Detective Comics #469. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an archenemy of Batman. ...


Batwoman uses methods that are more violent than what Batman uses, causing him to investigate. Detective Alcana acts as the leader of the trio, Dr. Ballantine, who works for Wayne Enterprises, uses her scientific background for their operations, and Kathy finances the team's equipment and activities. Alcana decides to base their shared costumed identity on Batman, who rescued the detective from a fire in her home years ago, despite the protests of Dr. Ballantine and Kathy. Each woman is also proficent in martial arts and an Olympic-level athlete. During the investigation, Bruce Wayne and Kathy develop a romantic affection after the two met at a department store. Bruce enjoys Kathy's company and is fond of her spiritual personality. Wayne's ward, Tim Drake, also became a friend with Dr. Ballentine, after they played the computer game Death Castle 3000 together in the office at Wayne Enterprises. Detective Alcana is paired with Gotham PD detective Harvey Bullock for this investigation, who's unaware of his partner's activities as Batwoman. Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


Dr. Ballantine designs the team's equipments and gadgets that were used throughout the film that are easily comparable with Batman's. She built a Batglider for flight which can be remote-operated by the team's utility belts. She also develops a new alloy that capable to program into any shape, which the team and Batman utilize as a type of restraining tool. The trio also uses weapons and gadgets that are based from Batman's, such as his batarangs and grappling gun. The trio's batarang design is a red miniature version of Batman's, an amalgam of the boomerang used by Australian Aborigines and ninja shuriken by Japanese shadow warriors. The grappling gun is not unlike the compact-climbing gear for commando units. It fires an explosively propelled grappling hook attached to a fast-uncoiling reel of jumpline. The team's headquarter is an abandoned subway station, accessible through a maze of sewer tunnels, and its entrance can be open through Batwoman's remote from her belt or glider. The headquarter is equipped with some advance computer, gymnasium, and laboratory equipments.


The costume is made from a grayish-black tight-fitting body suit which allows complete freedom of movement and camouflage, consisting of a scalloped cape emulating the shape of a pair of batwings, a bat-like cowl which conceals the entire face, a pair of red gloves, a yellow utility belt, and the stylized red insignia of a bat emblazoned on the chest. The cowl also carrying a voice-altering device to disguise the wearer's voice. Countershaded Ibex are almost invisible in the Israeli desert. ...


References

  1. ^ Fred Grandinetti. Remembering Kathy Kane: The First Batwoman. Newsarama. Retrieved on 2006-05-30.
  2. ^ Batman: the Complete History, Les Daniels 1999
  3. ^ 52 #7
  4. ^ 52 #27
  5. ^ 52 #28
  6. ^ Detective Comics #824
  7. ^ Newsarama-Dan Didio on DC Infinite Christmas Special
  8. ^ 52 #11
  9. ^ Out - Batwoman Comes Out!
  10. ^ Out - Batwoman Comes Out!
  11. ^ Superman/Batman #24 (November 2005)

13. Alex Ross on Batwoman Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
NEWSARAMA.COM: KATHY KANE: THE FIRST BATWOMAN (2741 words)
Batwoman, again in a minor role, attempts to capture the Cat-Man in Detective Comics #311, 1963, "The Challenge of The Cat-Man".  She gets tied up by the Cat-Man who falls in love with her.  Batman arrives and thanks Batwoman for delaying him but the feline crook becomes smitten with the girl gangbuster.
Batwoman became a team player in this story using her fists to battle the aliens.  A red bat-symbol was now a part of her uniform, appearing across her breasts.
The Batwoman is still a well-remembered character to this day as reprints of her older stories continue to be published.  Though lumped in with the goofy days of Batman's adventures, she proved she could hold her own and save the life of her male counterpart and his sidekick.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman (357 words)
Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman is an animated movie based on the DC Comics character Batman and set in the same world as Batman: The Animated Series.
At this time, it seems a new hero has arrived but as the title suggests, it is a mystery to even Batman who Batwoman is. As the plot thickens, so does the mystery as Batman must figure out who Batwoman is and to stop the Penguin and Rupert Thorn, underground mobsters, from selling illegal weapons.
Batwoman's main focus is on illegal activity by the Penguin.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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