FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Battle of the Pelennor Fields
Battle of the Pelennor Fields
Battle from Tolkien's Legendarium
Location Pelennor Fields and Minas Tirith
Date T.A. 15 March 3019
Result Victory for Gondor and allies
Books The Lord of the Rings
(The Return of the King)
Adaptations See below
Combatants
Gondor, Rohan, Dúnedain of the North Mordor, Harad, Rhûn, Khand, Umbar
Participants
Gandalf, Éomer, Éowyn, Aragorn, Imrahil, Merry, Denethor†, Théoden Witch-king of Angmar†, Nazgûl, Gothmog

In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, the Battle of the Pelennor Fields is the battle for the city of Minas Tirith between the forces of Gondor and its allies, and the forces of the Dark Lord Sauron. The battle is described in the chapter of the same name ('The Battle of the Pelennor Fields'), in The Return of the King, the third volume of The Lord of the Rings. The lead up to the conflict occupies most of the preceding chapters of The Return of the King, including the chapters 'Minas Tirith', 'The Muster of Rohan' and 'The Siege of Gondor'. Other events during the battle, and the immediate aftermath, are described in the next two chapters, 'The Pyre of Denethor' and 'The Houses of Healing'. The chapter 'The Last Debate' contains crucial backstory about the battle. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The phrase, Tolkiens legendarium, is commonly used among individuals who study J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Eä as a reference to the many works related to the universe and its legends. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the Pelennor Fields were the townlands and fields of Minas Tirith, capital of Gondor. ... Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ... This article includes several timelines relating to J. R. R. Tolkiens fiction. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... The banner of Rohan, as rendered in Peter Jacksons movies; the sun is an embellishment on the books description of a white horse upon green. Rohan (from Sindarin Rochand), is a fictional realm in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy era of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkien’s legendarium, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North, were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... Harad is a town in Saudi Arabia. ... Location of Rhûn in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Rhûn is a large region of eastern Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, Khand was the name of a land which lay to the south-east of Mordor and to the east of Near Harad. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Arda, a great haven to the far south of Gondor in Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... Éomer is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Éowyn (T.A. 2995–F.A. ?), a shieldmaiden of Rohan, is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth who appears in his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Imrahil was the twenty-second Prince of Dol Amroth. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... This article is about the Steward of Gondor in the time of the War of the Ring. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, Théoden was the seventeenth King of Rohan, and last of the Second Line. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl and the Black Captain among other names, is a fictional character from the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Nazgûl ilustration. ... One interpretation of Gothmog as an orc at the Battle of the Pelennor Fields in Peter Jacksons Return of the King Gothmog is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fictional universe. ... Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Fords of Isen were fords in the river Isen, guarded by the Rohirrim. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Fords of Isen were fords in the river Isen, guarded by the Rohirrim. ... Combatants Fangorn forest Isengard Commanders Treebeard Saruman Strength Roughly 50 Ents, thousands of Huorns from Fangorn forest, Merry and Pippin. ... Combatants Isengard Rohan Commanders Saruman Théoden, Aragorn, Gandalf, Éomer Strength 10,000 Uruk-hai and common Orcs of Isengard, 2,000-5,000 Dunlendings, an unknown number of orc-human hybrids about 2,000 Rohirrim; reinforced by 1,000 more Rohirrim in the morning, and thousands of Huorns Casualties... Combatants Galadhrim Mordor, Dol Guldur, Moria Commanders Celeborn and Galadriel Unknown Strength Total strength unknown, certainly far lower than the enemy. ... This was a major battle of the War of the Ring. ... Combatants Gondor Mordor Commanders Faramir, Boromir, Gandalf Sauron, Gothmog, the Witch-king Strength About 4000-5000 Gondorian soldiers plus 300 Rangers and an unknown number of reinforcements from the City,[citation needed] ~30,000-50,000 Orcs,[citation needed] the nine Nazgûl Casualties Over a third of Gondorian force... The Battle of Dale is fictional battle in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... Combatants Gondor, Rohan, Eagles Mordor, Harad, Rhûn Commanders Gandalf, Imrahil, Éomer, Aragorn, Gwaihir Sauron†, Mouth of Sauron*, Khamûl† Strength Less than 6,000 Men of Gondor and Rohan, one Wizard, one Hobbit, one Elf, two Half-elves, one Dwarf, and an unknown number of Eagles Eight Nazgûl... Combatants Hobbits of The Shire Ruffians in the service of Saruman Commanders Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took Ruffian chief†, Saruman†, Wormtongue† Strength 200 local Hobbits of the Shire under Meriadoc Brandybuck, including Tolman Cotton and Samwise Gamgee, and 110 Tooks from Tookland under Peregrin Took slightly over 200 Casualties 19... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The phrase, Tolkiens legendarium, is commonly used among individuals who study J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Eä as a reference to the many works related to the universe and its legends. ... Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... It has been suggested that Eye of Sauron be merged into this article or section. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


This battle was one of the central battles of the War of the Ring, the war in which the Third Age of Middle-earth came to a close. It took place on 15 March 3019, T.A.. It is named for the location where the battle took place, the Pelennor Fields, the townlands and fields between Minas Tirith and the River Anduin. The concept and history of composition of the battle is detailed in Sauron Defeated, the fourth volume of The History of the Lord of the Rings and part of the History of Middle-earth series. Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the Pelennor Fields were the townlands and fields of Minas Tirith, capital of Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... The History of The Lord of the Rings is a 4-volume work by Christopher Tolkien that documents the process of J. R. R. Tolkiens writing of his masterwork The Lord of the Rings (LotR). ... The History of Middle-earth is a 12-volume series of books published from 1983-1996, that collect and analyse material relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ...


The battle has featured in most adaptations of The Lord of the Rings, including portrayals in radio, film and on stage. It appeared in the films The Return of the King (1980), and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), the radio broadcast The Lord of the Rings (1981), and the musicals The Return of the King (2003) and The Lord of the Rings (2006 and 2007), though the latter production extensively changed the context of the battle to avoid the earlier storyline of the Battle of the Hornburg at Helm's Deep. The Lord of the Rings, an epic high fantasy novel by the British author J. R. R. Tolkien, set in his world of Middle-earth (a fictional past version of our Earth), has been adapted for various media multiple times. ... DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ... This article is about the musical. ... This article is about the musical. ... Combatants Isengard Rohan Commanders Saruman Théoden, Aragorn, Gandalf, Éomer Strength 10,000 Uruk-hai and common Orcs of Isengard, 2,000-5,000 Dunlendings, an unknown number of orc-human hybrids about 2,000 Rohirrim; reinforced by 1,000 more Rohirrim in the morning, and thousands of Huorns Casualties... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings, Helms Deep was a large valley in the north-western Ered Nimrais (White Mountains). ...


Critical analysis of the battle includes The Atlas of Middle-earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad, War and the Works of J.R.R. Tolkien by Tolkien scholar Janet Brennan Croft, Michael D. C. Drout's "Tolkien's Prose Style and its Literary and Rhetorical Effects", featured in the academic journal Tolkien Studies, and Fantasy: The Liberation of Imagination by Richard Matthews. The Atlas of Middle-earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad is an atlas of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth. ... Karen Wynn Fonstad is the author of several atlases of fictional worlds, including: Pern, basis for the Dragon Riders stories by Anne McCaffrey The Atlas of Pern (1984, ISBN 0345314344) The Land, basis for The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen R. Donaldson The Atlas of the Land (1985, ISBN... The works of J. R. R. Tolkien have generated a body of academic research, studying different facets such as Tolkien as a writer of fantasy literature Tolkiens invented languages As A Writer Splintered Light: Logos And Language In Tolkiens World Verlyn Flieger (1st Edition 1983, Revised Edition 2002... Michael D. C. Drout (1968- ) is the Prentice Associate Professor of English at Wheaton College and an author and editor specialzing in Anglo-Saxon and medieval literature, science fiction and fantasy, especially the works of J. R. R. Tolkien and Ursula K. LeGuin. ... Tolkien Studies: An Annual Scholarly Review is an academic journal, ISSN 1547-3155, containing papers on the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, edited by Douglas A. Anderson, Michael D. C. Drout, and Verlyn Flieger. ...

Contents

Literature

After the Battle of Osgiliath and the overrunning of the Rammas Echor, the last barriers against the forces of Mordor, the latter moved on the Pelennor Fields before the city on March 15, 3019 of the Third Age as the Great Darkness blotted out the sun.[1] Combatants Gondor Mordor Commanders Faramir, Boromir, Gandalf Sauron, Gothmog, the Witch-king Strength About 4000-5000 Gondorian soldiers plus 300 Rangers and an unknown number of reinforcements from the City,[citation needed] ~30,000-50,000 Orcs,[citation needed] the nine Nazgûl Casualties Over a third of Gondorian force... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the Pelennor Fields were the townlands and fields of Minas Tirith, capital of Gondor. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the Pelennor Fields were the townlands and fields of Minas Tirith, capital of Gondor. ... The Great Darkness is an uncertain term used by the ent Treebeard in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, apparently referring to the time that Middle-earth was under the dominion of Morgoth. ...


Participants

In The Lord of the Rings, the Siege of Minas Tirith and the subsequent Battle of the Pelennor Fields are examples of a mix of precise military detail and panoramic narrative.


Sauron's army from Minas Morgul, led by the Witch-king of Angmar - the Lord of the Nazgûl or Ringwraiths - greatly outnumbered the combined armies of Gondor and its allies. The former consisted of Men and other creatures under his sway. Of Men, there were Southrons of Harad (Haradrim), including footmen, cavalry, and numerous elephantine beasts called mûmakil or Oliphaunts; Easterlings from Rhûn and Khand (the latter were called Variags). Sauron also fielded a great number of Orcs and Trolls. Tolkien gives definite numbers for the Southrons only - some 18,000.[2] He writes about "the legions of Morgul... gathered there in strength".[2] The army, called the Morgul-host after the valley and/or city whence it issued, is described as the greatest to "issue from that vale since the days of Isildur's might, no host so fell and strong in arms had yet assailed the fords of Anduin; and yet it was but one and not the greatest of the hosts that Mordor now sent forth."[3] Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Morgul, also known by its earlier name Minas Ithil, is a fictional city in J.R.R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl and the Black Captain among other names, is a fictional character from the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Nazgûl ilustration. ... Nazgûl ilustration. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth the Haradrim or Southrons are a race of Men from The Lord of the Rings. ... Harad is a town in Saudi Arabia. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth the Haradrim or Southrons are a race of Men from The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional lands of Middle-earth, a mûmak (plural mûmakil) is a pachyderm of the southern land of Harad, similar to but much larger than todays elephant, and said to be its ancestor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional lands of Middle-earth, a mûmak (plural mûmakil) is a pachyderm of the southern land of Harad, similar to but much larger than todays elephant, and said to be its ancestor. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Easterlings were Men who lived in the east of Middle-earth, and were enemies of the Free Peoples. ... Location of Rhûn in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Rhûn is a large region of eastern Middle-earth. ... The stories of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium contain references to numerous places. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Easterlings were Men who lived in the east of Middle-earth, and were enemies of the Free Peoples. ... This Tolkien article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe perspective. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth, Trolls are very large (twelve feet tall or more) humanoids of great strength and poor intellect. ... Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Morgul, also known by its earlier name Minas Ithil, is a fictional city in J.R.R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... Location of Anduin in Middle Earth In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ...


The defenders' numbers were considerably less. Tolkien does not specify the numbers of the original garrison of Minas Tirith, the forward garrison of Osgiliath and Faramir's company of Rangers of Ithilien. Following his defeat at Osgiliath, Tolkien writes that Faramir is outnumbered by ten times and he loses one third of his men.[1] Tolkien gives a catalogue of companies from outlying provinces of Gondor that come to the aid of Minas Tirith; the contingent is numbered at less than 3,000.[4] Prominent among them were a company of 500[5][6] knights[1] and 700 footmen[4] of Dol Amroth, led by their lord Prince Imrahil. A large proportion of the men from Gondor's coastal towns were protecting themselves from attack by the Corsairs of Umbar and other folk under Sauron.[4][5] Faramir is also the name of Ondohers son. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Rangers of Ithilien, also known as the Rangers of the South and Rangers of Gondor, were an elite group of the Southern Dúnedain warriors who scouted in and guarded Ithilien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Dol Amroth is a fictional place being a princedom which forms part of the kingdom of Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Imrahil was the twenty-second Prince of Dol Amroth. ... The Corsairs of Umbar are a fictional nation of Men in the fantasy universe of J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


Later, 6,000 Riders of Rohan[7] would join the battle, as well as over 2,000 [5] Men from the coastal towns of Gondor, who had been relieved by Aragorn's 30-man strong company[8] of Rangers of the North (representing Gondor's long-fallen sister realm Arnor) and the Dead Men of Dunharrow.[2] The Men of Rohan (Rohirrim) were "thrice outnumbered by the Haradrim alone".[2] The banner of Rohan, as rendered in Peter Jacksons movies; the sun is an embellishment on the books description of a white horse upon green. Rohan (from Sindarin Rochand), is a fictional realm in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy era of Middle-earth. ... Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... The Grey Company is the force of Dúnedain, Elves, and other Men from the North of Middle-earth in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North, were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens high fantasy world of Middle-earth, the Dead Men of Dunharrow (also referred as the Shadow Host, the Grey Host, the oathbreakers, or simply the Dead) were the shades of Men of the White Mountains (Ered Nimrais), who were cursed to remain in Middle... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rohan. ...


The battle

The siege of Minas Tirith started after the fall of Osgiliath and the Rammas Echor, a great guarded wall fencing the Pelennor Fields (Pelennor means "fenced land" in Tolkien's artificial language Sindarin.) In the retreat Faramir, son of Denethor, Steward of Gondor, was severely wounded. The despairing Denethor watched over him and command of the defense of the city was left to the Wizard Gandalf.[1] Combatants Gondor Mordor Commanders Faramir, Boromir, Gandalf Sauron, Gothmog, the Witch-king Strength About 4000-5000 Gondorian soldiers plus 300 Rangers and an unknown number of reinforcements from the City,[citation needed] ~30,000-50,000 Orcs,[citation needed] the nine Nazgûl Casualties Over a third of Gondorian force... The languages of Middle-earth are artificial languages invented by J. R. R. Tolkien and used in his books about Middle-earth, including The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion. ... Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This article is about the Steward of Gondor in the time of the War of the Ring. ... The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ...


After repeated attacks by catapults and siege engines, Sauron's forces were able to breach the city gate using the giant battering ram Grond. The Witch-king entered alone and was confronted by Gandalf. However, at that moment the Rohirrim arrived and charged.[1] Grond Grond (called the Hammer of the Underworld) is the name of two fictional weapons from the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


King Théoden and the Rohirrim had arrived undetected and bypassed roadblocks thanks to their guides, the Wild Men of Drúadan Forest, who led them through a long-forgotten valley. The Hobbit Merry Brandybuck was with them, defying the king's orders. Thanks to his diminutive size, he had shared a horse with a young man called Dernhelm.[9] In J. R. R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth, the Drúedain, also known as Drûgin (singular being Drug), Woses, Wild Men of the Woods and Púkel-men, were a strange race of Men which was counted amongst the Edain. ... location of Druadan Forest in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Drúadan Forest was a forest in northern Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Hobbits are a diminutive race that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Hobbits are a diminutive race that inhabit the lands of Arda. ...


The Rohirrim secured the outer wall,[9] destroyed siege engines and camps, and drove off Haradrim cavalry. The Witch-king then attacked Théoden. The king's horse was killed, and it fell and crushed the king.[2] Horses are an important element in the fantasy world of Middle-earth created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


Dernhelm then faced the Witch-king. Long ago, it had been prophesied that the Witch-king would not fall "by the hand of man".[10] The Witch-king thus told him him no man could kill him. But Dernhelm was not a man, but rather Théoden's niece Éowyn in disguise. In the ensuing combat she was gravely injured. Merry intervened and stabbed the Witch-king with his sword. Merry's sword was centuries-old and contained spells against the Witch-king himself. The Witch-king was bitterly wounded. Éowyn then slew him, and fainted.[2] Éowyn (T.A. 2995–F.A. ?), a shieldmaiden of Rohan, is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth who appears in his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... The following list of weapons of Middle-earth includes all weaponry directly taken from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ...


Théoden died without realizing his niece was present. Her brother Éomer, now the king, discovered her lifeless body. Furious, he charged his cavalry without order into the enemy forces. Meanwhile, nearly every fighting man had left Minas Tirith to join the combat, led by Imrahil and other local captains. Imrahil rode up to Éowyn and found she still lived. She was sent to the Houses of Healing in the city, along with Merry. The Ringwraith's Black Breath had made them both gravely ill, as it had earlier done to Faramir.[2] Éowyn in the Houses of Healing In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Houses of Healing were the houses that lay in the sixth circle of Minas Tirith, surrounded by lawns and trees, where the healers of Gondor did their work. ... Nazgûl ilustration. ...


Before the Rohirrim arrived, Denethor prepared to burn himself and his son upon a funeral pyre. He despaired at visions of defeat that Sauron had sent him via his palantír, a Seeing-stone, and believed Faramir to be beyond cure. Only the intervention of the Hobbit Pippin Took, the guard Beregond, and Gandalf saved Faramir, but Denethor immolated himself before they could stop him.[11] However, Gandalf's rescue of Faramir quite possibly led to the death of Théoden, for he was going out to help the newly-arrived Rohirrim when Pippin called for his aid.[12] It has been suggested that Eye of Sauron be merged into this article or section. ... A palantír is a magical artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–?), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth; a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... Beregond, son of Baranor, is in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth the first Captain of the White Company, the guard of Faramir, Prince of Ithilien and previously, a Guard of the Citadel in Minas Tirith. ...


The battle turned against Gondor and their allies. Gothmog, lieutenant of Minas Morgul, brought forward reinforcements. The forces of Mordor rallied behind the mûmakil of the Haradrim. Éomer was cut off from the Gondorians and surrounded by the enemy. As he prepared to make a last stand on a hill, he saw a fleet of enemy ships with black sails sailing up the River Anduin. They were the ships of the Corsairs of Umbar, more of Sauron's reinforcements.[2] One interpretation of Gothmog as an orc at the Battle of the Pelennor Fields in Peter Jacksons Return of the King Gothmog is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fictional universe. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Location of Anduin in Middle Earth In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ...


Through his palantír, Denethor had seen these ships and thought they would ensure Gondor's defeat.[11] However, they were actually manned by Aragorn and other Rangers of the North, Gimli the Dwarf, Legolas the Elf, the Half-elven brothers Elladan and Elrohir and reinforcements from south Gondor.[5] Much of Sauron's forces were pinned between Aragorn and Éomer's cavalry. The tide of battle was finally and definitively turned in favor of Gondor, yet fighting lasted until the end of the day. A brief respite was won until the Battle of the Black Gate.[2] Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North, were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ... Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... Legolas is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Celeborn (portrayed by Marton Csokas), an Elf in Peter Jacksons adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Half-elven (Sindarin singular Peredhel, plural Peredhil), are the children of the union of Elves and Men. ... Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details about The Lord of the Rings follow. ... Combatants Gondor, Rohan, Eagles Mordor, Harad, Rhûn Commanders Gandalf, Imrahil, Éomer, Aragorn, Gwaihir Sauron†, Mouth of Sauron*, Khamûl† Strength Less than 6,000 Men of Gondor and Rohan, one Wizard, one Hobbit, one Elf, two Half-elves, one Dwarf, and an unknown number of Eagles Eight Nazgûl...


Tolkien later explains how Aragorn and his troops got there in a later chapter, "The Last Debate". As Legolas recounts to Merry and Pippin, they had come across a battle between Men of south Gondor and Haradrim on their way to Minas Tirith. Now Aragorn had with him an army of ghosts, the Dead Men of Dunharrow, whom he had summoned to fulfill an ancient oath to aid Gondor.[8] The Dead Men ended the battle by scaring the combatants away. After convincing the Gondorians to follow him, Aragorn proceeded downriver, where the Dead scared off the Corsairs and captured an entire fleet. The ships were then manned by Gondorians while the Dead were dismissed by Aragorn, their oath fulfilled.[5] In J. R. R. Tolkiens high fantasy world of Middle-earth, the Dead Men of Dunharrow (also referred as the Shadow Host, the Grey Host, the oathbreakers, or simply the Dead) were the shades of Men of the White Mountains (Ered Nimrais), who were cursed to remain in Middle...


Casualties

Tolkien gives no clearly stated final death toll for the battle. A full one-third (2,000) of the 6,000 Rohirrim were killed or wounded, including Théoden. Of the defenders of Minas Tirith from Gondor, no definite figure exists.[5]


As for Mordor's losses, again, the size of Sauron's great army is not definitely known. It was virtually destroyed on the field. Few men under Sauron's command escaped to their lands to the east and south.[2]


Aside from those already mentioned, other named characters who perished in the battle included: Halbarad, one of the Rangers of the North and Aragorn's standard-bearer; Grimbold, Marshal of Rohan; and Forlong the Fat of Lossarnach, Derufin and Duilin of Morthond and Hirluin the Fair of Pinnath Gelin - all captains of Gondor's provinces.[2] Halbarad is a character in the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien. ... Grimbold is a character in the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Lossarnach was a region and fiefdom in southern Gondor. ... The river Morthond exists in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ...


Depictions

Illustration

Éowyn and the Nazgûl by Ted Nasmith.

Various artists have illustrated the battle or elements of it, including Alan Lee,[13][14] John Howe,[15] Frank Frazetta,[16] the Brothers Hildebrandt,[17][18] and Ted Nasmith.[19] Éowyn facing the Witch-king of Angmar is a common subject. Image File history File links NasmithWitchKing. ... Image File history File links NasmithWitchKing. ... Ted Nasmith Ted Nasmith is a Canadian artist, illustrator and architectural renderer. ... Alan Lee 2003 in (New Zealand) Alan Lee (born August 20, 1947) is an English book illustrator and movie conceptual designer. ... John Howe 2003 John Howe (born August 21, 1957 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) is a book illustrator, living in Neuchatel, Switzerland. ... Frank Frazetta (born February 9, 1928) is one of the worlds most influential fantasy and science fiction artists. ... The Brothers Hildebrandt are twin brothers who together worked as fantasy and science fiction artists. ... Ted Nasmith Ted Nasmith is a Canadian artist, illustrator and architectural renderer. ...


Animation

Radio

In this BBC radio series, the Battle of the Pelennor Fields is heard from two sides, the first being mainly Pippin's. One hears him discussing with Denethor, and like in the book, he has to find Gandalf to prevent Denethor from burning Faramir. This part is very similar to the book. The second side is the battle itself. Théoden's speech is declaimed, followed by music. A vocalist sings how the Rohirrhim host rides forth and attacks the forces of darkness. Then the vocalism changes again and one hears Jack May and Anthony Hyde, voicing respectively Théoden and Éomer, saying a Nazgûl is coming. The 'opera' begins again, stating the Witch-king attacks Théoden, smacks him down and prepares to kill him. The vocalism ends here, then one hears Éowyn facing the Witch-king and slaying him. Some have felt that this opera style tends to distance the listeners from the action.[citation needed] Jack May (23 April 1922—19 September 1997) was an English actor most well known for his portrayal of wine bar owner Nelson Gabriel in the long-running BBC radio drama, the Archers. ...


Live-action film

The battle is the major centrepiece of Peter Jackson's film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, although many of the events described above are simplified or altered for cinematic purposes. In the battle proper, importance is given to the arrival of the Rohirrim, the combat with the Oliphaunts, and the deaths of Théoden and the Witch-king.


There is no mention of reinforcements from Gondor's allied territories, nor of any allied territories at all. The Rammas Echor outer wall is also absent. The main obstacle to the advance of Mordor's forces is the defense of Osgiliath, which is soon swept away, though Faramir, overseeing it, manages to escape. However, he is sent on a suicidal charge to retake it by Denethor, which leads to his wounding and Denethor's eventual fall into insanity.

The forces of Mordor assailing Minas Tirith
The forces of Mordor assailing Minas Tirith

The enemy officer Gothmog is interpreted as a grotesquely misshapen Orc, whereas Tolkien gives neither his race nor his physical appearance (in fact, the author mentions him only once in the entire book). While he is not explicitly stated to be "lieutenant of Minas Morgul", Gothmog has a prominent role in the film as the Witch-king's field commander. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 337 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 404 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is a screenshot from a copyrighted film, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by the studio which produced the film, and... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 337 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 404 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is a screenshot from a copyrighted film, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by the studio which produced the film, and...


Minas Tirith suffers considerable damage to its walls thanks to Sauron's catapults, whereas Tolkien writes:

At first men laughed and did not greatly fear such devices. For the main wall of the City was of great height and marvellous thickness, built ere the power and craft of Númenor waned in exile; and its outward face was like to the Tower of Orthanc, hard and dark and smooth, unconquerable by steel or fire, unbreakable except by some convulsion that would rend the very earth on which it stood.[1]

Archers of Gondor defending the walls of Minas Tirith
Archers of Gondor defending the walls of Minas Tirith

Gandalf and the Gondorians fight Orcs from siege towers on the walls. In the book enemies do not reach the walls and the first foe to enter the city is the Witch-king, and does so only after the gate is breached. In a scene in the Extended Edition, Orcs ineffectually use a small battering ram before Grond. When Grond breaches the gate, the first enemies to enter are great Trolls wielding clubs, followed by other enemies. After intense fighting, as dawn begins to break, Gandalf and the remaining Gondorians withdraw into the upper levels, while the enemy occupies the first circle of the city. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 337 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 404 pixel, file size: 76 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is a screenshot from a copyrighted film, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by the studio which produced the film, and... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 337 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 404 pixel, file size: 76 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is a screenshot from a copyrighted film, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by the studio which produced the film, and...


The Extended Edition also contains a confrontation between the Witch-king and Gandalf. However, instead of before the Gate, it is when Gandalf is on his way to save Faramir from the funeral pyre. The Witch-king breaks Gandalf's staff but flees when he hears the horns of the arriving Rohirrim.


As dawn breaks, Théoden and the Rohirrim arrive and rout the Orcs. Unlike the book, the film makes it clear beforehand that Éowyn has ridden secretly with the others; she does not use the alias "Dernhelm". Peter Jackson said this was because it was harder to do in film than in books.[20] The writers rearrange some of the book's lines. Théoden says Éomer's line, "Ride now to ruin and the world's ending!, which the latter originally says after seeing his sister "dead" (in a slightly different form).[21] The entire host of Rohan shouts "Death!", and then charges forward.


The Rohirrim drive the Orcs back, but then encounter mûmakil. Théoden orders a second charge against these, which results in many casualties. (The production team originally created several scenes in keeping with the original, where men went on foot and shot arrows in their eyes due to horses fearing the beasts. However, when they viewed the finished shots they felt that it looked so much like animal cruelty that the audience would be horrified and sympathize with the mûmakil, so these scenes were omitted.)[20] Nevertheless the Rohirrim bring down some beasts with arrows and spears. Éowyn also helps Théoden fight off Orcs, but Théoden does not realize she is there.


The Witch-king bowls Théoden and his horse over with his fell beast. He is armed with a huge flail (instead of the book's mace) and a sword. Éowyn then faces him. She reveals herself as a woman just before giving the Witch-king the fatal blow, whereas in the book she reveals her true nature before they fight. She and Théoden exchage words before the latter dies.

Aragorn leading the Army of the Dead
Aragorn leading the Army of the Dead

Aragorn arrives on the Corsair ships accompanied by only Legolas and Gimli and the "Army of the Dead" (a term Tolkien does not use), and Sauron's forces are defeated. The Dead, invincible and unstoppable, kill all of Sauron's forces on the field and within Minas Tirith. Legolas, narrating the incident to Merry and Pippin in a later chapter, doubts whether or not the Dead are able to inflict physical harm, and their power instead lies in their ability to instill great fear.[5][22] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 337 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 404 pixel, file size: 54 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is a screenshot from a copyrighted film, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by the studio which produced the film, and... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 337 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 404 pixel, file size: 54 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is a screenshot from a copyrighted film, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by the studio which produced the film, and... In J. R. R. Tolkiens high fantasy world of Middle-earth, the Dead Men of Dunharrow (also referred as the Shadow Host, the Grey Host, the oathbreakers, or simply the Dead) were the shades of Men of the White Mountains (Ered Nimrais), who were cursed to remain in Middle...


Following the battle, Aragorn dismisses the Dead – but only after a scene of silent hesitation, where Gimli suggests that they keep them for their usefulness. The aftermath of the battle is mournful, with Éomer discovering Éowyn's body amid the corpses of the field. This leads on to the Houses of Healing sequence.


The movie adaptation posits roughly 180,000 killed in the battle.[citation needed]CNN.com put the battle on a list of best and worst battle scenes in film, where it appeared twice: one of the best before the Army of the Dead arrives, and one of the worst after that.[23] The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ...


Musicals

Concept and creation

Sauron Defeated, the fourth volume of The History of the Lord of the Rings, part of the History of Middle-earth series, contains superseded versions of the battle. Some changes of detail are apparent. For example, Théoden dies by a projectile to the heart instead of being crushed by his horse; when Éowyn reveals her sex she has cut her hair short, a detail absent from the final version. Tolkien also considered killing off both Théoden and Éowyn.[24] The History of The Lord of the Rings is a 4-volume work by Christopher Tolkien that documents the process of J. R. R. Tolkiens writing of his masterwork The Lord of the Rings (LotR). ... The History of Middle-earth is a 12-volume series of books published from 1983-1996, that collect and analyse material relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ...


Critical response

The battle (and/or Tolkien's manner of writing about it) has been analyzed in various publications.


The Atlas of Middle-earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad gives a graphic rendition of the order of battle and various troop sizes.[25] The Atlas of Middle-earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad is an atlas of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth. ... Karen Wynn Fonstad is the author of several atlases of fictional worlds, including: Pern, basis for the Dragon Riders stories by Anne McCaffrey The Atlas of Pern (1984, ISBN 0345314344) The Land, basis for The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen R. Donaldson The Atlas of the Land (1985, ISBN... An order of battle (often abbreviated as ORBAT, OOB, or OB) is an organizational tool used by military intelligence to list and analyze enemy military units. ...


War and the Works of J.R.R. Tolkien by Tolkien scholar Janet Brennan Croft examines the influence of World War I and II on Tolkien's fantasy writings, and the development of his attitude towards war.[26] The works of J. R. R. Tolkien have generated a body of academic research, studying different facets such as Tolkien as a writer of fantasy literature Tolkiens invented languages As A Writer Splintered Light: Logos And Language In Tolkiens World Verlyn Flieger (1st Edition 1983, Revised Edition 2002...


Michael D. C. Drout's "Tolkien's Prose Style and its Literary and Rhetorical Effects", featured in the academic journal Tolkien Studies, published by West Virginia University Press, analyzes Tolkien's writing style and deduces influence from and parallels with King Lear. Drout also writes about the evolution of events in the narrative using material from the History of Middle-earth series.[27] Michael D. C. Drout (1968- ) is the Prentice Associate Professor of English at Wheaton College and an author and editor specialzing in Anglo-Saxon and medieval literature, science fiction and fantasy, especially the works of J. R. R. Tolkien and Ursula K. LeGuin. ... Tolkien Studies: An Annual Scholarly Review is an academic journal, ISSN 1547-3155, containing papers on the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, edited by Douglas A. Anderson, Michael D. C. Drout, and Verlyn Flieger. ... West Virginia University Press (or WVU Press), founded in the 1960s, is a university press that is part of West Virginia University. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is based on the legend of King Lear, a legendary king of Britain, and is considered to be one of William Shakespeares greatest tragedies. ...


The events of the battle are also analyzed in Fantasy: The Liberation of Imagination by Richard Matthews, which explores "how fantasy uses the elements of enchantment and the supernatural to explode everyday reality and create profound insights into essential human realities."[28][29]


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Siege of Gondor". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Battle of the Pelennor Fields". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  3. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Two Towers. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Stairs of Cirith Ungol". ISBN 0-395-08254-4. 
  4. ^ a b c J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "Minas Tirith". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Last Debate". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  6. ^ "...another company of five hundred horse..." - "The Last Debate"
  7. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Muster of Rohan". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  8. ^ a b J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Passing of the Grey Company". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  9. ^ a b J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Ride of the Rohirrim". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  10. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, Appendix A, "Gondor and the Heirs of Anárion". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  11. ^ a b J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Pyre of Denethor". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  12. ^ "Beyond hope the Captain of our foes has been destroyed... But he has not gone without woe and bitter loss. And that I might have averted but for the madness of Denethor." - "The Pyre of Denethor"
  13. ^ The Siege of Gondor by Alan Lee
  14. ^ The Battle of the Pelennor Fields by Alan Lee
  15. ^ The Siege of Minas Tirith by John Howe
  16. ^ Éowyn and the Lord of the Nazgûl by Frank Frazetta
  17. ^ The Siege of Minas Tirith by the Brothers Hildebrandt
  18. ^ Lady Éowyn and the Nazgûl by the Brothers Hildebrandt
  19. ^ Éowyn and the Lord of the Nazgûl by Ted Nasmith
  20. ^ a b The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King DVD edition
  21. ^ "Over the field rang his clear voice calling: 'Death! Ride, ride to ruin and the world's ending!'" - "The Battle of the Pelennor Fields"
  22. ^ "Pale swords were drawn; but I know not whether their blades would still bite, for the Dead needed no longer any weapon but fear. None would withstand them." - "The Last Debate"
  23. ^ CNN.com - The Screening Room. "The best -- and worst -- movie battle scenes." Last retrieved July 30, 2007.
  24. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1992). in Christopher Tolkien (ed.): Sauron Defeated. Boston, New York, & London: Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 0-395-60649-7. 
  25. ^ Fonstad, Karen Wynn (1991). The Atlas of Middle-earth. Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 0-61-812699-6. 
  26. ^ Croft, Janet Brennan (2004). War and the Works of J.R.R. Tolkien. Praeger Publishers. ISBN 0-41-593890-2.  Overview/review page
  27. ^ Drout, Michael D. C. (2004). "Tolkien's Prose Style and its Literary and Rhetorical Effects". Tolkien Studies 1 (1): 137-163. Retrieved on 2007-07-31. 
  28. ^ Amazon.com book decription for Fantasy: The Liberation of Imagination
  29. ^ Matthews, Richard (2002). Fantasy: The Liberation of Imagination. 2002. ISBN 0-41-593890-2. 

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... The History of The Lord of the Rings is a 4-volume work by Christopher Tolkien that documents the process of J. R. R. Tolkiens writing of his masterwork The Lord of the Rings (LotR). ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Karen Wynn Fonstad is the author of several atlases of fictional worlds, including: Pern, basis for the Dragon Riders stories by Anne McCaffrey The Atlas of Pern (1984, ISBN 0345314344) The Land, basis for The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen R. Donaldson The Atlas of the Land (1985, ISBN... Michael D. C. Drout (1968- ) is the Prentice Associate Professor of English at Wheaton College and an author and editor specialzing in Anglo-Saxon and medieval literature, science fiction and fantasy, especially the works of J. R. R. Tolkien and Ursula K. LeGuin. ... Tolkien Studies: An Annual Scholarly Review is an academic journal, ISSN 1547-3155, containing papers on the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, edited by Douglas A. Anderson, Michael D. C. Drout, and Verlyn Flieger. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

  • Middle-earth warfare

  Results from FactBites:
 
Battles of Middle-earth (10487 words)
The battle was fought on November 3, 3019, in the village of Bywater.
The Orcs in the valley regrouped and rejoined the battle.
The Battle of the Pelennor Fields was fought on March 15, 3019, between the forces of Sauron and the combined forces of Gondor and Rohan.
Battle of the Pelennor Fields: Information From Answers.com (2947 words)
The Battle of the Pelennor Fields is a fictional event: a contest for the city of Minas Tirith in J.
It was the greatest battle of the War of the Ring, and indeed the largest of the entire Third Age.
In the battle proper, importance is given to the arrival of the Rohirrim, the combat with the Oliphaunts, and the deaths of Théoden and the Witch-king.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m