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Encyclopedia > Battle of Tippecanoe
Battle of Tippecanoe
Part of Tecumseh's War/War of 1812

19th century depiction of the battle by Alonzo Chappel
Date November 7, 1811
Location near present Battle Ground, Indiana
Result U.S. victory
Belligerents
Tecumseh's confederacy United States
Commanders
Tenskwatawa William Henry Harrison
Strength
550-700 1,000 regulars and militia
Casualties and losses
50+ killed
70+ wounded
62 killed
126 wounded

The Battle of Tippecanoe was fought in 1811 between United States forces led by Governor William Henry Harrison of the Indiana Territory and forces of Tecumseh's growing American Indian confederation. The battle took place outside Prophetstown, near present-day Battle Ground, Indiana, and was part of what is sometimes known as Tecumseh's War, which continued into the War of 1812. Although Harrison's side suffered great casualties despite its far superior numbers, the battle was an important political and symbolic victory for the American forces. At Vincennes in 1810, Tecumseh loses his temper when William Henry Harrison refuses to rescind the Treaty of Fort Wayne. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Image File history File links Tippecanoe. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... Battle Ground is a town located in Tippecanoe County, Indiana. ... Look up Victory in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Tecumseh (disambiguation). ... Tenskwatawa Tenskwatawa, Tenskatawa,, Tensquatawa or Elskwatawa (1775 – November 1836) was a Native American religious and political leader known as the Shawnee Prophet (of the Shawnee tribe). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Combatants Britain Native Americans United States Commanders Captain Charles Roberts Lieutenant Porter Hanks Strength about 600 61 Casualties 0 61 surrendered The Battle of Mackinac Island (1812) was a British victory in the War of 1812. ... The Battle of Brownstown was an early skirmish in the War of 1812. ... Combatants Britain United States Commanders Adam Muir James Miller Strength 75 regulars, 70 natives, 60 militia 600 regulars Casualties 6 killed, 21 wounded, 2 surrendered 18 killed, 64 wounded Detroit frontier Tippecanoe – 1st Mackinac Island – Brownstown - Maguaga – Fort Dearborn – Detroit – Fort Harrison – Fort Wayne – Mississinewa – Frenchtown – Fort Meigs – Fort Stephenson... Combatants Potawatomi United Kingdom United States Commanders Chief Blackbird Nathan Heald Strength 500+ 69 military + civilians Casualties 15 39 military + 27 civilians The Fort Dearborn massacre occurred on August 15, 1812 near Fort Dearborn in the United States during the War of 1812. ... Combatants United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Native Americans United States Commanders Isaac Brock Tecumseh William Hull # Strength 600 natives, 330 regulars, 300 militia, 2,500 Casualties 2 wounded 7 killed, 2,493 captured Detroit frontier Tippecanoe – 1st Mackinac Island – Brownstown - Maguaga – Fort Dearborn – Detroit – Fort Harrison – Fort Wayne... The Battle of Fort Harrison was a decisive victory for the United States against an Indian force which greatly outnumbered their own. ... The Siege of Fort Wayne took place during the War of 1812, between American and Indian forces in the wake of the successful British campaigns of 1812. ... The Battle of the Mississinewa also known as the Battle of Mississineway was an expedition ordered by William Henry Harrison against Miami villages in response to the attacks on Fort Wayne. ... Combatants Britain, American Indians United States Commanders Henry Procter, Tecumseh James Winchester Strength 450 natives, 200 regulars, 300 militia, 1,000 regulars and militia Casualties 24 dead, 158 wounded 397 dead, 561 wounded or captured Detroit frontier Tippecanoe – 1st Mackinac Island – Brownstown - Maguaga – Fort Dearborn – Detroit – Fort Harrison – Fort Wayne... The Siege of Fort Meigs took place during the War of 1812 in northwestern Ohio. ... The Battle of Fort Stephenson was an American victory during the War of 1812. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Robert Heriot Barclay Oliver Hazard Perry Jesse Elliot Strength 2 ships 2 brigs 1 schooner 1 sloop 3 brigs 5 schooners 1 sloop Casualties 41 dead 93 wounded prisoners 306 surrendered Entire squadron captured 27 dead 96 wounded One brig heavily damaged The Battle... Combatants British Empire Indian Confederation United States Commanders Henry Procter Tecumseh † William Henry Harrison Strength 800 regulars 500 natives1 2,380 militia 1,000 cavalry 120 regulars 260 natives1 Casualties 155 British dead or wounded 477 captured 33 natives dead 15 dead 30 wounded The Battle of the Thames, also... Combatants Britain First nations United States Commanders James Lewis Basden Andrew Holmes Strength 300 180 Casualties 14 dead, 52 wounded, 1 missing 4 dead, 3 wounded The Battle of Longwoods was a battle of the War of 1812 on March 4, 1814, fought near present-day Wardsville, Ontario. ... Combatants British Empire Native Americans United States Commanders William McKay Joseph Perkins Strength about 650 about 100 Casualties 0 dead, few wounded 5 wounded The Battle of Prairie du Chien was a British victory in the far western theater of the War of 1812. ... Combatants British Empire United States Commanders Robert McDouall George Croghan Andrew Holmes† Strength about 300 700 Casualties 1 dead, 1 wounded 13 dead, 51 wounded The Battle of Fort Mackinac was a British victory in the War of 1812. ... Combatants Great Britain United States Commanders Miller Worsley Arthur Sinclair George Croghan Casualties 3 killed 9 wounded 1 schooner destroyed 6 killed 6 wounded 2 gunboats captured The Engagement on Lake Huron was actually a series of minor engagements, which left the British in control of the Lake, and thus... The Battle of Malcolms Mills was a brief skirmish during the War of 1812, in which a force of American cavalry overran and scattered a force of Canadian militia. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Map of the Indiana Territory Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... For other uses, see Tecumseh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Prophetstown State Park is located by the town of Battle Ground, Indiana on the site of the Battle of Tippecanoe. ... Battle Ground is a town located in Tippecanoe County, Indiana. ... At Vincennes in 1810, Tecumseh loses his temper when William Henry Harrison refuses to rescind the Treaty of Fort Wayne. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ...

Contents

Battle

When Harrison's forces approached the town late on November 6, a young Indian, named Marvin Reed, rode on horseback out from the town waving a white flag. He carried a message from the Prophet requesting a cease fire until the next day when the two sides could hold a peaceful meeting. Harrison agreed but was wary of the Prophet's overture and kept sentinels on duty over night. is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Although existing accounts are unclear about exactly how the skirmish began, Harrison’s sentinels encountered advancing warriors in the pre-dawn hours of November 7. As the soldiers awoke to scattered gunshots, they discovered themselves almost encircled by the Prophet’s forces. Fierce fighting broke out as the Indians broke through Harrison’s lines and entered the camp. As the sentinels fled back to camp, the volunteers quickly regrouped and repulsed the advance while securing their own lines. Throughout the morning Harrison's troops fought off several charges. When the Indians began to run low on ammunition and the sun rose, revealing how small the Prophet's army really was, the Indian forces finally retreated. Harrison had 68 men killed or mortally wounded, and about 126 less seriously wounded. The number of Indian casualties is the subject of intense debate, but it was certainly lower than that of the United States forces. Historians estimate that as many as 50 were killed and about 70-80 were wounded.[1] is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Fearing Tenskwatawa's imminent return with reinforcements, Harrison ordered his men to fortify their position. The next day, November 8, he sent a small group of men to inspect the town, which was deserted, as the defeated Indian forces had retreated during the night. Harrison ordered his troops to burn down Prophetstown and destroy the Indians' cooking implements, without which the confederacy could not survive the winter. is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Prophetstown may refer to Prophetstown, Illinois, USA Prophets Town or Prophetstown in Indiana, USA, site of the 1811 Battle of Tippecanoe and now the Prophetstown State Park Category: ...


Harrison's troops buried their dead on the site of their camp. They built large fires over the mass graves in an attempt to conceal them from the Indians. However, after Harrison's troops departed the area, the Indians returned to the gravesite, digging up many of the corpses and scattering the bodies.


Aftermath

Monument near the battle site
Monument near the battle site

The Battle of Tippecanoe was a serious blow to Tecumseh's dream of a unified Indian confederacy. Tecumseh continued to play a major role in military operations on the frontier, however, and by 1812 he had regained much of his former strength. Tecumseh's troops made up nearly half of the British army that captured Detroit from America in the War of 1812. It was not until Tecumseh's death at the 1813 Battle of the Thames that his confederation ceased to threaten American expansion. When William Henry Harrison ran for President of the United States during the election of 1840, he used the slogan "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too" to remind people of his heroism during the battle. Download high resolution version (900x1200, 234 KB)Tippecanoe Battlefield Monument. ... Download high resolution version (900x1200, 234 KB)Tippecanoe Battlefield Monument. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Combatants British Empire Indian Confederation United States Commanders Henry Procter Tecumseh † William Henry Harrison Strength 800 regulars 500 natives1 2,380 militia 1,000 cavalry 120 regulars 260 natives1 Casualties 155 British dead or wounded 477 captured 33 natives dead 15 dead 30 wounded The Battle of the Thames, also... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... A campaign banner with the Tip and Ty slogan. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Casualty figures and force sizes from Sugden, pp. 235-6, and Edmunds, p. 115.

Literature

  • Edmunds, R. David. The Shawnee Prophet. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, 1983. ISBN 0-8032-1850-8.
  • Sugden, John. Tecumseh: A Life. New York: Holt, 1997. ISBN 0-8050-4138-9 (hardcover); ISBN 0-8050-6121-5 (1999 paperback).

External links

  • Tippecanoe County Historical Association
  • Battle of Tippecanoe
  • The Battle of Tippecanoe

  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle of Tippecanoe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (567 words)
The Battle of Tippecanoe was fought between United States forces led by Governor William Henry Harrison of the Indiana Territory and forces of Tecumseh's growing American Indian confederation.
The Battle of Tippecanoe was a crushing blow to Tecumseh's dream of a unified Indian confederacy.
Although the battle was crushing, it was not until 1813 at the Battle of the Thames and the death of Tecumseh that his confederation was eliminated.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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