FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Battle of Sluys
Battle of Sluys
Part of the Hundred Years' War

A miniature of the battle from Jean Froissart's Chronicles, 14th century
Date 24 June 1340
Location Near Sluis, Zeeuws Vlaanderen
Result Decisive English Victory
Combatants
Kingdom of England Kingdom of France
Commanders
Edward III of England Hugues Quiéret,
Nicolas Béhuchet
Strength
250 ships 190 ships
Casualties
Unknown 20 000 (Europe: A History by Norman Davies)
Most ships captured


The naval Battle of Sluys was fought on 24 June 1340 as one of the opening conflicts of the Hundred Years' War. It is significant as it resulted in the destruction of most of France's fleet ensuring that the remainder of the war would mostly be fought in France and not carried over to an invasion of England. Combatants France Castile Scotland Genoa Majorca Bohemia Crown of Aragon Brittany England Burgundy Brittany Portugal Navarre Flanders Hainaut Aquitaine Luxembourg Holy Roman Empire The Hundred Years War was a conflict between France and England, lasting 116 years from 1337 to 1453. ... Battle of Sluys Illustration from Chronicles, a 14th century manuscript by Jean Froissart This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The word miniature, derived from the Latin minium, red lead, is a picture in an ancient or medieval manuscript; the simple decoration of the early codices having been miniated or delineated with that pigment. ... Jean Froissart (~1337 - ~1405) was one of the most important of the chroniclers of medieval France. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Europe has about 74 million inhabitants. ... Sluis is a municipality and a town in the southwestern Netherlands in the west of Zeeuws-Vlaanderen. ... Zeeuws-Vlaanderen is the part of the Netherlands (nr. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... The borders of modern France closely align with those of the ancient territory of Gaul, inhabited by Celts known as Gauls. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Norman Davies, Warsaw (Poland), October 7, 2004 Norman Davies (born June 8, 1939 in Bolton, Lancashire) is an English historian of Welsh descent, noted for his publications on the history of Poland, Europe and the British Isles. ... The first part of the Hundred Years War was from 1337 to 1360, from the outbreak of hostilities until the signing of the Treaty of Brétigny. ... The Battle of Cadsand was fought in 1337 between the English, commanded by the Earl of Derby and Sir Walter Manny, and the Flemish garrison of Cadzand, under Sir Guy of Flanders, bastard son of Louis, Count of Nevers. ... Combatants England Flanders France Genoese mercenaries Castilian mercenaries Commanders Robert Morley, Various others Hugues Quiéret, Nicolas Béhuchet Strength Varied 40-70 ships The English Channel naval campaign of the years 1338 and 1339 saw a protracted series of raids conducted by the nascent French navy and numerous privately... Combatants France Flanders England Commanders Eudes IV, Duke of Burgundy Jean I, Count of Armagnac Robert III of Artois Strength ~3,000 11,000-16,000 Casualties Unknown, light 8,000 The battle of Saint-Omer was a large action fought in 1340 as part of King Edward IIIs... The Battle of Auberoche was fought in 1345 between the English and the French. ... This article is about the battle in 1346 during the Hundred Years War. ... The Battle of Blanchetaque was fought in 1346 between French and English forces. ... Combatants Kingdom of England, Allied knights from Germany and Denmark France, Genoese Mercenaries, the Kingdoms of Navarre, Bohemia and the Balearic Islands Commanders Edward III of England Edward, the Black Prince Philip VI of France Strength about 12,000 30,000 to 40,000 Casualties 150-1,000 killed and... Combatants Kingdom of England Kingdom of France Commanders Edward III of England Jean de Fosseux Strength 34,000 men: 5,300 knights, 6,600 infantry, 20,000 archers, 2,000 Flemish soldiers 7,000 to 8,000 citizens The Siege of Calais in northern France began in 1346, towards the... Combatants Scotland England Commanders David II of Scotland William Zouche, Archbishop of York Strength 12,000 3,000-3,500 Casualties 7,000 Unknown but very low The Battle of Nevilles Cross took place near Durham, England on October 17, 1346. ... The naval Battle of LEspagnols sur Mer (Spanish on the Sea), or Battle of Winchelsea took place on 29 August (Old Style) 1350 and was a victory for an English fleet of 50 ships commanded by Edward III, with the Black Prince, over a Castilian fleet of 40 ships... Combatants Kingdom of England Gascony France Commanders Edward, the Black Prince Captal de Buch John II of France Strength 9,000 12,000 Casualties Minimal 2,500 killed or wounded The Battle of Poitiers was fought between the Kingdom of England and France on September 19, 1356, resulting in the... Combatants France Castile Scotland Genoa Majorca Bohemia Crown of Aragon Brittany England Burgundy Brittany Portugal Navarre Flanders Hainaut Aquitaine Luxembourg Holy Roman Empire The Hundred Years War was a conflict between France and England, lasting 116 years from 1337 to 1453. ... The first part of the Hundred Years War was from 1337 to 1360, from the outbreak of hostilities until the signing of the Treaty of Brétigny. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The First Castilian Civil War[1] lasted three years from 1366 to 1369. ... Combatants Kingdom of Castile; With the support of: Granada; England; Republic of Genoa; Navarre Crown of Aragon; With the support of: pretender Henry of Trastámara; France Commanders Pedro of Castile Peter IV of Aragon The War of the Two Peters (Spanish: , Catalan: ) was a war fought from 1356 to... Du Guesclin made constable by Charles V. The Caroline War was the second phase of the Hundred Years War between France and England, following the Edwardian War. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Europe has about 74 million inhabitants. ... Combatants France Castile Scotland Genoa Majorca Bohemia Crown of Aragon Brittany England Burgundy Brittany Portugal Navarre Flanders Hainaut Aquitaine Luxembourg Holy Roman Empire The Hundred Years War was a conflict between France and England, lasting 116 years from 1337 to 1453. ...


Battle of Sluys

The encounter took place in front of the town of Sluys or Sluis, (French Écluse), on the inlet between West Flanders and Zeeland. In the middle of the 14th century this was an open roadstead capable of holding large fleets; it later was silted up by the river Eede. A French fleet, which the English king Edward III, in a letter to his son Edward, the Black Prince, put at 190 sail, had been collected in preparation for an invasion of England. It was under the command of Hugues Quiéret, admiral for the king of France, and of Nicolas Béhuchet, a lawyer who had been one of the king's treasurers. Part of the fleet consisted of Genoese galleys serving as mercenaries under the command of Egidio Bocanegra (Barbavera). Although many English historians speak of King Edward’s fleet as inferior in number to the French, it is certain that he sailed from Orwell on June 22 with 200 sail, and that he was joined on the coast of Flanders by his admiral for the North Sea, Sir Robert Morley, with 50 more. Some in this swarm of vessels were no doubt mere transports, for the king brought with him the household of his queen, Philippa of Hainault, who was then at Bruges. As, however, one of the queen's ladies was killed in the battle, it would appear that all the English vessels were employed. Sluis is a municipality and a town in the southwestern Netherlands in the west of Zeeuws-Vlaanderen. ... West Flanders (Dutch: West-Vlaanderen) is the westernmost province of Flanders and of Belgium. ... Capital Middelburg Largest city Terneuzen Queens Commissioner Karla Peijs Religion (1999) Protestant 35% Catholic 23% Area  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water   1,788 km² (10th) 1,146 km² Population (2006)  â€¢ Total  â€¢ Density 380,186 (11th) 213/km² (10th) Anthem Zeeuws volkslied ISO NL-ZE Official website www. ... A roadstead is a place outside a harbor where a ship can lie at anchor. ... Eede is a village in the Dutch province of Zeeland. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Edward, Prince of Wales, KG (15 June 1330 – 8 June 1376), popularly known as the Black Prince, was the eldest son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault, and father to King Richard II of England. ... The Republic of Genoa, in full the Most Serene Republic of Genoa (known as the Ligurian Republic from 1798 to 1805) was an independent state in Liguria on the northwestern Italian coast from ca. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... Philippa of Hainault Philippa of Hainault (~1314 - August 15, 1369) was the Queen consort of Edward III of England. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ...


Edward anchored at Blankenberge on the afternoon of 23 June and sent three squires to observe the position of the French. The Genoese Barbavera advised his colleagues to go to sea, but Béhuchet, who as constable exercised the general command, refused to leave the anchorage. He probably wished to occupy it in order to bar the king’s road to Bruges. The disposition of the French was made in accordance with the usual medieval tactics of a fleet fighting on the defensive. Quiéret and Béhuchet formed their force into three or four lines, with the ships tied to one another, and with a few of the largest stationed in front as outposts. King Edward entered the road-stead on the morning of the 24th, and after manoeuvering to place his ships to windward, and to bring the sun behind him, attacked. In his letter to his son he says that the enemy made a noble defence "all that day and the night after." His ships were arranged in two lines, and it may be presumed that the first attacked in front, while the second would be able to turn the flanks of the opponent. The battle was a long succession of hand-to-hand conflicts to board or to repel boarders. Edward makes no mention of any actual help given him by his Flemish allies, though he says they were willing; the French claim that they joined after dark. They also assert that the king was wounded by Béhuchet, but this is not certain, and there is no testimony save a legendary one for a personal encounter between him and the French commander, though it would not be improbable. The beach at Blankenberge circa 1895 Blankenberge is a municipality in the Belgian province of West Flanders. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The battle concluded with the almost total destruction of the French. Quiéret was slain, and Béhuchet is said to have been hanged on King Edward’s orders. Barbavera escaped to sea with his squadron on the morning of 25 June, carrying off two English prizes. English chroniclers claim that the victory was won with small cost of life, and that the loss of the French was 20,000 men, but no reliance can be placed on medieval estimates of numbers. After the battle King Edward remained at anchor several days, and it is probable that his fleet had suffered heavily. is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle of Sluys - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (795 words)
The naval Battle of Sluys was fought on 24 June 1340.
It was one of only two naval battles in which King Edward III of England commanded in person, the other being the Battle of L'Espagnols-sur-Mer.
The story of the battle of Sluys is told from the English side by Sir Harris Nicolas, in his History of the Royal Navy, vol.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m