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Encyclopedia > Battle of Palmito Ranch
Battle of Palmito Ranch
Part of American Civil War
Date May 12-May 13, 1865
Location Cameron County, Texas
Result Confederate victory
Combatants
United States of America Confederate States of America
Commanders
Theodore H. Barrett John "Rip" Ford
Strength
Detachments from the:
62nd U.S. Colored Infantry Regiment, 2nd Texas Cavalry Regiment, 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry
Detachments from:
Gidding’s Regiment, Anderson’s Battalion of Cavalry, and other Confederate units and Southern sympathizers
Casualties
118 killed and wounded few dozen wounded
Expedition from Brazos Santiago
Palmito Ranch

The American Civil War Battle of Palmito Ranch was fought on May 12May 13, 1865, and in the kaleidoscope of events following the surrender of Robert E. Lee's army, was nearly ignored. It was the last major clash of arms in the war. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Cameron County is a county located in the state of Texas. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (traditional) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic President... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (traditional) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic President... John Salmon Ford (b. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career U.S. Army officer and the most celebrated general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ...


Reason for Battle

Early in 1865, both sides in Texas made a gentlemen's agreement that there was no point to further hostilities. By that time, most Union troops had pulled out from Texas for campaigns in the east. The Confederates sought to protect their remaining ports for cotton sales to Europe, as well as importation of supplies. Mexicans tended to side with the Confederates due to a lucrative smuggling trade. Official language(s) English (de facto) See also languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... A Gentlemens agreement is an informal agreement between two parties. ... Cotton ready for harvest. ...


Why the needless battle even happened remains something of a mystery—perhaps Union Colonel Theodore H. Barrett had political aspirations. Neither local exports of cotton nor Mexican smuggling had a significant effect on the war. Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...


Barrett certainly had very little military experience. It has since been suggested that he had seen little to no combat during the war, and felt to bolster his political desires after the war, he needed to establish a reputation as a war hero, possibly reasoning that most of the opposing candidates he would likely later face during an election would most likely be former military men.


Combat Events

Barrett instructed Lieutenant Colonel David Branson to attack the rebel encampment at Brazos Santiago Depot near Fort Brown outside Brownsville, commanded by Confederate Major John "Rip" Ford. Fort Brown from across the Resaca Fort Brown was a military post of the United States Army in Texas during the latter half of 19th century and the early part of the 20th century. ... Brownsville is a city in Cameron County, Texas, United States. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (traditional) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic President... John Salmon Ford (b. ...


Union forces marched upriver from Brazos Santiago to attack the Confederate encampment, and were at first successful, due to the Confederates being under the understanding that hostilities had ceased. However, after some confusion and bitter fighting, the Union forces were then driven back by a relief Confederate force. The next day, the Union forces attacked again, and again to initial success and later failure. Ultimately, the Union force retreated to the coast.


There were 118 Union casualties. Confederate casualties were "a few dozen" wounded, none killed. Like the war's first big battle at First Bull Run, which also yielded little gain for either side, the battle is recorded as a Confederate victory. Like the Battle of New Orleans, it occurs after the war was over and therefore could not affect the outcome. Texas armies formally surrendered on May 26, 1865; Confederate general Kirby Smith surrendered his forces in the Trans-Mississippi Department on June 2. First Battle of Bull Run Conflict American Civil War Date July 21, 1861 Place Fairfax County and Prince William County Result Confederate victory The First Battle of Bull Run, referred to as the First Battle of Manassas in the South, (July 21, 1861) was the first major land battle of... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Sir Edward Pakenham† John Lambert Alexander Cochrane Andrew Jackson Strength 8,000 men 3,500-4,000 men Casualties 385 killed 1,186 wounded 484 captured 13 killed 58 wounded 30 captured The Battle of New Orleans, also known as the Battle of Chalmette... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... Portrait of Edmund Kirby Smith during the Civil War Edmund Kirby Smith (1824–1893) was a general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, notable for his command of the western Confederacy after the fall of Vicksburg. ... The Trans-Mississippi Department, also known as the Trans-Mississippi Theater or Trans-Mississippi District, was the Confederate military designation for the geographic area of operations west of the Mississippi River during the American Civil War. ... June 2 is the 153rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (154th in leap years), with 212 days remaining. ...


It is worth noting that private John J. Williams of the 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry was the last man killed at the Battle at Palmito Ranch, and probably the last combat casualty of the war. Fighting in the battle were white, African, Hispanic and native troops. Reports of shots from the Mexican side are unverified, though many witnesses reported firing from the Mexican shore. The 34th Regiment Indiana Infantry was organized at Anderson, Indiana, and mustered in September 16, 1861. ...


References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle Of Palmito Ranch (364 words)
On May 12, Barrett led a mixed force of 800 fl and white Union infantry and cavalry in attacking a Confederate outpost on the banks of the Rio Grande at Palmito Ranch, 12 miles from Brownsville, and captured the place.
The Confederates suffered only five minor wounds in the skirmish at Palmito Ranch, while 30 Union soldiers were killed or wounded and another 113 were captured.
The last fighting by land forces of any size during the war, Palmito Ranch was a Confederate victory.
Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Battle of Palmito Ranch (346 words)
The American Civil War Battle of Palmito Ranch was fought on May 12 - 13, 1865, and in the kaleidoscope of events following the surrender of Robert E. Lee army, was nearly ignored.
Why the needless battle even happened remains something of a mystery — perhaps Union Colonel Theodore H. Barrett had political aspirations.
It is worthy to note that private John J. Williams of the 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry was the last man killed at the Battle at Palmito Ranch, and probably the last of the war.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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