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Encyclopedia > Battle of Nineveh (627)
Battle of Nineveh
Part of the Roman-Persian Wars
Date: December 12, 627
Location: near Nineveh
Result: Byzantine victory
Combatants
Byzantine Empire Sassanid Empire
Commanders
Heraclius Rhahzadh
Strength
 ?  ?
Casualties
 ?  ?

The Battle of Nineveh was the climactic battle of the last of the Roman-Persian Wars between the Byzantine Empire and the Sassanid Empire, in 627. The Byzantine victory broke the power of the Sassanid dynasty and briefly restored the Empire to its ancient boundaries in the Middle East. The Roman-Persian Wars were a series of conflicts between the Roman world and the Persian Empire that started during the late Roman Republic in 92 BC and was carried over to the Eastern Roman Empire lasting until 627. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... Events April 11 - Paulinus, a Roman missionary, baptizes King Edwin of Deira December 12 - Battle of Nineveh: Byzantine Emperor Heraclius defeats the Persians Births Deaths November 10 - Justus, Archbishop of Canterbury Categories: 627 ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... The Sassanid Empire in the time of Shapur I; the conquest of Cappadocia was temporary Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) Dominant Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of... Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas. ... Rhahzadh , alternatively known as Razates was a Persian Spahbod (commander) under Sassanid king Khosrau II. As the war with between Sassanid empire and Byzantium came close to its 15 year the Byzantine general and emporer Heraclius made a bold move. ... The Roman-Persian Wars were a series of conflicts between the Roman world and the Persian Empire that started during the late Roman Republic in 92 BC and was carried over to the Eastern Roman Empire lasting until 627. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... The Sassanid Empire in the time of Shapur I; the conquest of Cappadocia was temporary Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) Dominant Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of... Events April 11 - Paulinus, a Roman missionary, baptizes King Edwin of Deira December 12 - Battle of Nineveh: Byzantine Emperor Heraclius defeats the Persians Births Deaths November 10 - Justus, Archbishop of Canterbury Categories: 627 ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


During a six-year campaign, the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius had driven the Persians from Asia Minor back into their own territories, but the Persian emperor Khosrau II still refused to make peace. On December 12, 627, the main armies of Heraclius, in personal command, and Khosrau's army commanded by the general Rhahzadh, met at Nineveh. How many soldiers engaged in the battle is unknown. Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... Khosrau II (sometimes called Parvez, the ever Victorious), King of Persia, son of Hormizd IV of Persia (579–590), grandson of Khosrau I of Persia (531–579). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... Rhahzadh , alternatively known as Razates was a Persian Spahbod (commander) under Sassanid king Khosrau II. As the war with between Sassanid empire and Byzantium came close to its 15 year the Byzantine general and emporer Heraclius made a bold move. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


The battle was closely contested, but Heraclius' superior generalship won the day, and Rhahzadh was killed by Heraclius in the fighting. The Persian army was driven from the field and Persia lay open to the Byzantine army. The next year, Persia accepted Heraclius' peace terms. 18th Century Painting by Francois-Andre Vincent showing one of the greatest Byzantine Generals in the Empires History, Belisarius. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle of Nineveh (627) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (218 words)
The Battle of Nineveh was the climactic battle of the last of the Roman-Persian Wars between the Byzantine Empire and the Sassanid Empire, in 627.
On December 12, 627, the main armies of Heraclius, in personal command, and Khosrau's army commanded by the general Rhahzadh, met at Nineveh.
The Persian army was driven from the field and Persia lay open to the Byzantine army.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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