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Encyclopedia > Battle of New Orleans (Civil War)
Battle of New Orleans
Part of the American Civil War

Panoramic View of New Orleans-Federal Fleet at Anchor in the River, ca. 1862.
Date April 25May 1, 1862
Location New Orleans and St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana
Result Union victory
Combatants
United States of America Confederate States of America
Commanders
Officer David G. Farragut and Maj. Gen. Benjamin Franklin Butler Maj. Gen. Mansfield Lovell
Strength
Department of the Gulf Department No. 1
Casualties
229 782
Lower Seaboard Theater
Fort Sumter - Santa Rosa Island - Fort Pulaski - Forts Jackson and St. PhilipNew OrleansSecessionvilleSimmon's BluffTampaBaton Rouge1st Donaldsonville - St. John's Bluff - Georgia Landing - 1st Fort McAllister - Fort BislandIrish BendVermillion Bayou - 1st Charleston Harbor – 1st Fort Wagner – Grimball's Landing – 2nd Fort Wagner2nd Fort Sumter – 2nd Charleston Harbor - Plains StorePort Hudson - LaFourche Crossing – 2nd Donaldsonville – Kock's Plantation – Stirling's Plantation - Fort Brooke - Gainesville - Olustee - Natural Bridge

The Battle of New Orleans is a seven-day battle in which the Union gained control of the largest Confederate city without a single casualty. The battle, fought at New Orleans and St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana between April 25 and May 1, 1862, was a major turning point of the American Civil War. This article is becoming very long. ... Download high resolution version (1092x1404, 362 KB)Panoramic View of New Orleans-Federal Fleet at Anchor in the River, ca. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Location Location of St. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (traditional) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic President... Admiral David Glasgow Farragut David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801 - August 14, 1870) was an admiral of the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (1795–1858) was a U.S. lawyer. ... Mansfield Lovell Image:MansfieldLOVELL.jpg Birth: Oct. ... This article presents an overview of major military and naval operations in the Lower Seaboard Theater of the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Robert Anderson P.G.T. Beauregard Strength 85 soldiers 500 soldiers Casualties 1 dead 5 injured 4 injured The Battle of Fort Sumter (April 12 – April 13, 1861), was a relatively minor military engagement at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Battle of Fort Pulaski was fought on April 11, 1862, between Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Forts Jackson and St. ... The Battle of Secessionville occurred on June 16, 1862 in the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders Lt. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders A.J. Drake J.W. Pearson Strength 1 gunboat Osceola Rangers, company Casualties 0 0 The Battle of Tampa was a minor engagement of the American Civil War fought June 30–July 1, 1862, between the United States Navy and... Combatants Confederate States of America United States of America Commanders John C. Breckinridge Thomas Williams† and Thomas W. Cahill Strength 2600 2500 Casualties 478 dead 371 dead The Battle of Baton Rouge (or Magnolia Cemetery) was a ground and naval battle in the American Civil War fought in East Baton... Combatants Confederate States of America United States of America Commanders Capt. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders John M. Brannan Charles F. Hopkins Strength 2 infantry regiments, 1 artillery battery, and 1 cavalry company (1,500) 1 artillery battery, and 1 cavalry company Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Saint Johns Bluff (also called St. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Capt. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Nathaniel P. Banks Richard Taylor Strength Department of the Gulf, XIX Corps Army of Western Louisiana Casualties 234 (estimated) 450 (estimated) The Battle of Fort Bisland was fought between Union Major General Nathaniel P. Banks against Confederate Major General Richard... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Nathaniel Prentice Banks Richard Taylor Strength Army of the Gulf, XIX Corps Army of Western Louisiana Casualties 350 (estimated) unknown The Battle of Irish Bend, also known as Niersons Wood or Franklin, was fought between Union Major General Nathaniel... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Nathaniel Prentice Banks Richard Taylor Strength Department of the Gulf, XIX Corps Army of Western Louisiana Casualties unknown unknown The Battle of Vermillion Bayou was fought on April 17, 1863, the third battle in a series of running battles between... The First Battle of Fort Wagner was fought on July 11, 1863, between Union and Confederate forces. ... The Storming of Fort Wagner Fort Wagner (also called Battery Wagner) was a fortification on Morris Island, South Carolina, that covered the southern approach to Charleston harbor. ... The Second Battle of Fort Sumter was fought from August 17 to September 9 of 1863 between Union and Confederate forces. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Christopher C. Augur Frank W. Powers William R. Miles Strength 1st Division, XIX Army Corps, Army of the Gulf  ? Casualties 150 100 The Battle of Plains Store or the Battle of Springfield Road was fought May 21, 1863 in East... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Nathaniel P. Banks Franklin Gardner Strength XIX Army Corps, Army of the Gulf Confederate forces, 3rd District, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, Port Hudson Casualties 5,000 7,208 The Siege of Port Hudson occurred in the summer of... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders A.A. Semmes John Westcott Strength USS Tahoma, USS Adela 2nd Florida Infantry, Company A Casualties 16 Unknown The Battle of Fort Brooke was a minor engagement fought October 12 through October 18, 1863, near Tampa, Florida, during the... Gainesville, site of a crucial railroad junction and depot in north central Florida, was the scene of small-scale fighting during the Civil War. ... The Battle of Olustee was a battle in the American Civil War which took place near Lake City, Florida on February 20, 1864. ... The Battle of Natural Bridge was a battle during the American Civil War, fought near Tallahassee, Florida on March 6, 1865. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (traditional) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic President... Generally, a battle is an instance of combat in warfare between two or more parties wherein each group will seek to defeat the others. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Location Location of St. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is becoming very long. ...


New Orleans was captured by the Union without a battle in the city itself early on in the war and thus was spared the destruction suffered by many other cities of the American South. Historic Southern United States. ...

Contents

Prelude

The political and commercial importance of New Orleans, as well as its strategic position, marked it as the objective of a Union expedition soon after the opening of the Civil War. Captain D.G. Farragut was selected by the Union government for the command of the Western Gulf squadron in January 1862. The four heavy ships of the squadron (none of them armoured) were, with many difficulties, brought up to the head of the passes, and around them assembled nineteen smaller vessels (mostly gunboats) and a flotilla of twenty mortar-boats under Commander D.D. Porter. In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Admiral David Glasgow Farragut Admiral David Glasgow Farragut David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801 – August 14, 1870) was the senior officer of the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. ... A gunboat is literally a boat carrying one or more guns. ... A flotilla (from Spanish, meaning a flota of small ships, and this from French flotte), or naval flotilla, is a formation of small warships that may be part of a larger fleet. ... Portrait of David Dixon Porter during the Civil War David Dixon Porter (June 8, 1813 – February 13, 1891) was a United States admiral who became one of the most noted naval heroes of the Civil War. ...


The main defenses of the Mississippi River consisted of the two permanent forts, Jackson Fort and St. Philip Fort. These were of masonry and brick construction, armed with heavy rifled guns as well as smooth-bores, and placed on either bank so as to command long reaches of the river and the surrounding flats. In addition, the Confederates had some improvised ironclads and gunboats, large and small. The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest named river in North America, with a length of 2320 miles (3733 km) from Lake Itasca to the Gulf of Mexico. ... Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were ships sheathed with thick iron plates for protection. ... A gunboat is literally a boat carrying one or more guns. ...


On April 16, 1862, after elaborate reconnaissances, the Union fleet steamed up into position below the forts, and on the April 18 the mortar-boats opened fire. Their shells fell with great accuracy, and although one of the boats was sunk and two disabled, Fort Jackson was seriously damaged. But the defenses were by no means crippled even after a second bombardment on April 19, and a formidable obstacle to the advance of the Union main fleet was a boom between the forts designed to detain the ships under close fire should they attempt to run past. Gunboats were repeatedly sent up at night to endeavour to destroy the boom, and the bombardment went on, disabling only a few guns but keeping the gunners of Fort Jackson under cover. At last the gunboats Pinola and Itasca ran in and broke a gap in the boom, and at 2 a.m. on April 24 the fleet weighed, Farragut in the corvette Hartford leading. After a severe conflict at close quarters, with the forts and with the ironclads and fire rafts of the defence, almost all the Union fleet (except the mortar-boats) forced its way past. April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (115th in leap years). ... French steam corvette Dupleix (1856-1887) Canadian corvettes on antisubmarine convoy escort duty during World War II. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate but larger than a coastal patrol craft. ...


Battle

At noon on [April 12], Farragut anchored in front of New Orleans; Forts Jackson and St. Philip, isolated and continuously bombarded by the mortarboats, surrendered on April 28. Soon afterwards the military portion of the expedition occupied the city. At the end of the battle Union forces engraved April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 247 days remaining. ...


"The Union Must and Shall Be Preserved"


on the statue of Andrew Jackson that honored him for the Battle of New Orleans in the War of 1812. For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Sir Edward Pakenham† John Lambert Alexander Cochrane Andrew Jackson Strength 8,000 men 3,500-4,000 men Casualties 385 killed 1,186 wounded 484 captured 13 killed 58 wounded 30 captured The Battle of New Orleans, also known as the Battle of Chalmette... Combatants United States Great Britain Canada Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other...



The commander, General Benjamin Butler, subjected New Orleans to a rigorous martial law so tactlessly administered as greatly to intensify the hostility of South and North. Known as order no 28. this attacked the dignity of the women of New Orleans. Butler also hanged a kid for pulling down a Union flag. In the city, Butler was nicknamed "The Beast", or "Spoons Butler" (the latter arising from silverware looted from local homes by some Union troops, though there was no evidence that Butler was personally involved in such thievery). Butler's administration did have benefits to the city, which was kept both orderly and healthy. Towards the end of the war General Nathaniel Banks held the command at New Orleans. Benjamin Franklin Butler (November 5, 1818 – January 11, 1893) was an American lawyer and politician who represented Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and later served as its governor. ... For other uses, see Martial law (disambiguation). ... // A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things proper name (for example, Bob, Rob, Robbie, Robin, and Bert are possible nicknames for Robert). ... Starch-polyester disposable cutlery Cutlery refers to any hand utensil used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food. ... Nathaniel Prentice Banks [sometimes spelled incorrectly Prentiss] (January 30, 1816–September 1, 1894), American politician and soldier, was born at Waltham, Massachusetts. ...


See also

The history of New Orleans, Louisiana traces its development from its founding by the French, through its period under Spanish control, then back to French rule before being sold to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. ... Fort Massachusetts is a fort on West Ship Island along the Gulf Coast of the United States. ...

External links

  • National Park Service battle description

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