FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Battle of Mount Harriet
Battle of Mount Harriet
Part of Falklands War
Date June 11 - June 12, 1982
Location Mount Harriet, Falkland Islands
Result British victory
Combatants
Flag of United Kingdom United Kingdom Flag of Argentina Argentina
Commanders
Lt. Col. Nick Vaux Lt. Col. Diego Soria
Strength
600 Royal Marines/Welsh Guards approximately 400 troops
Casualties
2 killed
26 wounded
18 killed
50 wounded
300 captured
Falklands War
Pebble IslandGoose GreenTop Malo HouseMount HarrietTwo SistersMount LongdonWireless RidgeMount Tumbledown
Selected mountains in East Falkland
Selected mountains in East Falkland

The Battle of Mount Harriet was an engagement of the Falklands War which took place on the night of 11/12 June 1982 between British and Argentine forces. It was one of three battles in a brigade-sized operation on the same night. Combatants United Kingdom Argentina Casualties 258 killed [3] 777 wounded 59 taken prisoner 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner The Falklands War (Spanish: ) was fought in 1982 between Argentina and the United Kingdom over the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Combatants United Kingdom Argentina Casualties 258 killed [3] 777 wounded 59 taken prisoner 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner The Falklands War (Spanish: ) was fought in 1982 between Argentina and the United Kingdom over the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. ... The Raid on Pebble Island took place on 14-15 May 1982[citation needed] during the Falklands War. ... Combatants United Kingdom Argentina Commanders Lt. ... Combatants United Kingdom Argentina Commanders Captain Rod Boswell 2nd Lieutenant Luis Albert Brown Strength 19 troops 17 troops Casualties 3 wounded 5 killed 7 wounded 5 captured The Battle of Top Malo House was fought on the 31st May 1982 during the Falklands War, between Argentinian Special Forces from 602... Combatants United Kingdom Argentina Commanders Lt. ... Combatants United Kingdom Argentina Commanders Lt. ... Combatants United Kingdom Argentina Commanders Lt. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Image File history File links Map of East Falkland showing mountains and settlements in the Mount Longdon area. ... Image File history File links Map of East Falkland showing mountains and settlements in the Mount Longdon area. ... Combatants United Kingdom Argentina Casualties 258 killed [3] 777 wounded 59 taken prisoner 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner The Falklands War (Spanish: ) was fought in 1982 between Argentina and the United Kingdom over the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The British force consisted of 42 Commando (42 CDO), Royal Marines under the command of Lt. Col. Nick Vaux Royal Marines (who later became a general) with artillery support from a battery of 29 Commando Regiment, Royal Artillery. The 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards (1WG) and two companies from 40 CDO were in reserve. HMS Yarmouth provided naval-gunfire support for the British forces. The Argentinian defenders consisted of Lieutenant-Colonel Diego Soria's 4th Infantry Regiment (RI 4). Official name Her Majestys Royal Marines Captain-General HRH The Duke of Edinburgh Nicknames Royals Motto Per Mare Per Terram Anniversaries 23 April 1918 - The Raid on Zeebrugge 28 April 1915 - Gallipoli 6 June 1944 - The Landings in Normandy 7 June 1761 - The Battle of Belle Isle 14 June... Her Majestys Royal Marines, also known as the Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys Light Infantry, the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in Arctic and Mountain Warfare. ... Her Majestys Royal Marines, also known as the Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys Light Infantry, the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in Arctic and Mountain Warfare. ... The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army It is made up of a number of regiments. ... The Welsh Guards is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division. ... HMS Yarmouth (F101) was this first Modified Type 12 (Rothesay) class frigate to enter service with the Royal Navy. ... THE FOURTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY. By LIEUT. JAMES A. LEYDEN, ADJUTANT 4TH U. S. INFANTRY. The Legion of the United States, by which title the regular army was known from 1792 to 1796, was a theoretically well balanced military organization of four divisions, each division or sub-legion containing Dragoons...


On the night of 30 May, K Company of 42 CDO moved forward of San Carlos to secure the commanding heights of Mount Kent, at 1,504 feet the tallest of the peaks surrounding Stanley, where the D Squadron SAS Troops had already established a strong presence. However when these arrived at their landing zone some 3 kilometres (2 mi) behind the ridge of the mountain, the Marines were surprised to see the flashes and lines of tracer ammunition light up the night . After a fierce fight at close quarters the Argentine patrol (Captain Tomas Fernandez's 2nd Assault Section, 602nd Commando Company) melted away from the boulders and snow-soaked scrub and grass. By the end of May Major Cedric Delves' D Squadron had gained Mount Kent and Tactical HQ commenced patrolling Bluff Cove Peak which they took with a loss of two wounded.


The attack was preceded by many days of observation and nights of patrolling. Some night-fighting patrols were part of a deception plan to convince the Argentinians that the attack would come from a westerly direction. Other, more covert, patrols were to find a route through a minefield around the south of Mount Harriet. Sniping and naval artillery were used to harass the defenders and deny them sleep.


On 3 June Lieutenant Chris Marwood's Reconnaissance Troop of 42 CDO patrolling forward from Mount Challenger encountered an RI 4 fighting patrol (3rd Platoon of B Company). Two of the conscripts were instantly killed in a withering burst of rifle fire, and a corporal went down wounded to a head shot by one of the Marine snipers as he took cover among the rocks. The Royal Marines were taken completely by surprise when Argentine special-forces commandos joined in the movement and a general counter-attack developed. Captain Nick D' Appice remembers: June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ...


We were separated from our heavy bergans with the radios and all our gear. The patrol was spread over quite a large area, with lots of shouting, noise and firing going on. The Marines abandoned all their equipment, and although no one told us, it became clear that we were to withdraw. With no information, and the likelihood of having to fight our way out, Dave Greedus and I decided to abandon our equipment, destroying as much as we could. The two radio sets (HF and UHF) were tough enough, but the HAZE unit of the laser target marker was designed to withstand the weight of a tank! (Hugh McManners, The Scars of War, p. 238, Harper Collins Publishers, 1993)


On the night of 8-9 June, action on the outer-defence-zone flared when Lieutenant Mark Townsend's 1 Troop (K Company, 42 CDO) probed Mount Harriet, killing two Argentines. At the same time three strong fighting patrols from 3 PARA attempted the same on Mount Longdon, but the Rasit ground surveillance radar there was able to detect the Paras and artillery fire dispersed the force.


On the morning of the 11 June the orders for the attack were given to 42 CDO by Vaux; K Company were ordered to attack the eastern end of the mountain while L Company would attack the southern side an hour later, where it, if the mountain was secured, would then move north of Mount Harriet to Goat Ridge. J Company would launch a diversionary attack (codenamed Vesuvius) on the western end of Mount Harriet. June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ...


In the closing hours of the 11 June, K and L Companies moved from their assembly area on Mount Challenger (which lay to the west of Mount Harriet) and made their way south, around their objective, across the minefield, to their respective start lines. As they moved around the feature in the dark, J company launched their very loud diversionary "attack" from the west. June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ...


BATTLE SUMMARY


Image:WwwF56BattleMtHarriet.GIF Image File history File links WwwF56BattleMtHarriet. ...


The battle for Mount Harriet began on the evening of 11 June with a blistering naval bombardment which killed two Argentines and wounded twenty-five. John Witheroe, one of the British war correspondents, later recalled the softening up fire:


We were involved with one night attack on Mount Harriet, when the Welsh Guards were coming up as a back-up. This involved marching for several hours on a very dark night, through a minefield. Sporadic shellfire slowed our progress tremendously. Eventually we made the base of Mount Harriet, which was coming under incredible fire from a frigate ashore. The whole mountain seemed to erupt in flame. It seemed impossible that anybody could survive an attack like that. This went on for well over an hour, shell after shell whistling over our heads and hitting the mountain. Eventually this was lifted and the Marines went in. To our amazement there seemed to be an incredible amount of fighting going on. There was a lot of tracer fire. The whole night was being lit up by flares, which cast a dead, unrealistic, pall over the whole scene. (Speaking Out: Untold Stories from the Falklands War, p. 271, Andre Deutsch, 1989)


Captain Peter Babbington's K Company crossed their start-line first and proceeded up the mountain undetected, knifing two sentries on the way. They remained undetected until they approached Sub-Lieutenant Mario Juarez's 120-mm Mortar Platoon positions and decided to engage them. They were assisted in the advance by HMS Yarmouth, artillery and mortars. During the engagement Corporal Larry Watts was killed. About 150 metres from Soria's HQ, Corporal Nigel Ward circled behind a group of Argentines who were setting up an ambush. Although half a dozen Argentines and a MAG were placed to massacre anyone who broke cover, Ward darted out from under cover to charge the enemy machine gun. He grenaded two of the crew, but reaching the rear of the machine gun position, he was shot through both legs. With the enemy machine gun out of action, Corporals Mick Eccles and Chrystie Ward were able to clear the position without losses. The three corporals were awarded the Military Medal. Increasing numbers of Argentine soldiers, mainly conscripts from RI 4's Recce Platoon began to surrender, but the Commanding Officer and Intelligence Officer and several senior NCOs still fought on according to their orders.


L Company crossed their start line shortly after K Company and were almost immediately engaged by effective machine gun fire from Sub-Lieutenant Pablo Oliva's platoon defending the lower southern slopes. These weapons would not be silenced until being hit by several MILAN anti-tank missiles and six 105 mm artillery guns from Mount Challenger. The L Company Marines contend they took fire from at least seven machine guns that only wounded five men, but as Hugh Bicheno detailed in Razor's Edge (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2006), the 4th Regiment's passive night goggles were all with B Company. Milano redirects here. ...


Before first light Lieutenant Jerry Burnell's 5 Troop of L Company proceeded to an outcrop of rocks towards Goat Ridge. As they advanced the Royal Marine platoon came under heavy fire from Sub-Lieutenant Lautaro Gimenez Corvalan's 3rd Platoon and were forced to withdraw. L Company requested artillery fire onto the Argentinian platoon position, then 4 Troop moved forward and found that the Argentinians had withdrawn. Further fighting went on throughout the morning of 12 June and a fanatically brave conscript, in a position just below the summit, held up L Company with accurate shooting until killed by an 84 mm anti-tank rocket fired at short range. June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ...


The battle was a textbook example of good planning and use of deception and surprise, and a further step towards their main objective of Port Stanley. British casualties were two killed and twenty-six wounded. Fifteen Argentine dead lay around the defences. Lance-Corporal Koleszar had the surprising experience of finding that two 'dead' Argentine soldiers, whose boots he was trying to remove, were very much alive and jumped up to surrender. Some British reporters were thus misled into depicting the Argentinians as hapless teenage conscripts who caved in after the first shots were fired, but Royal Marine Warrant Officer 2 John Cartledge who served with K Company during the battle corrected them, saying the Argentinians were good soldiers who had fought properly:


"They used the tactics which they had been taught along the way very well, they were quite prepared for an attack. They put up a strong fight from start to finish. They were also better equipped than we were. We had first generation night sights, which were large cumbersome pieces of equipment, while the Argentines had second generation American night sights that were compact and so much better than what we had. The one deficiency which we exposed was that they had planned for a western end of the mountain attack, and therefore had not bothered to extend their defensive positions to the eastern end, where we ultimately attacked’" ([1])


When J Company moved up the mountain on the bitterly cold morning of 12 June, the total catch was 300 prisoners, fifty of whom had been wounded.


External links

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Harriet Lane (1056 words)
Harriet Rebecca Lane was the niece and official hostess of President James Buchanan.
Harriet Lane, built for the Treasury Department by William H. Webb, was launched in New York City November 1857.
Harriet Lane again transferred to the Navy 30 March 1861 for service in the expedition sent to Charleston Harbor, S.C., to supply the Fort Sumter garrison.
Battle of Mount Harriet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1541 words)
The Battle of Mount Harriet was an engagement of the Falklands War which took place on the night of 11/12 June 1982 between British and Argentine forces.
The battle for Mount Harriet began on the evening of 11 June with a blistering naval bombardment.
The battle was a textbook example of good planning and use of deception and surprise, and a further step towards their main objective of Port Stanley.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m