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Encyclopedia > Battle of Monterrey
Battle of Monterrey
US troops march on Monterrey
Conflict: Mexican-American War
Date: September 21-23, 1846
Place: Monterrey, Nuevo León
Result: U.S. victory
Combatants
United States Mexico
Commanders
Zachary Taylor Pedro de Ampudia
Strength
6,000 7,000 Regulars
3,000 Militia
Casualties
468 367

The Battle of Monterrey (September 21September 23, 1846) was an engagement in the Mexican-American War in which General Pedro de Ampudia and the Mexican Army of the North managed to fight US troops to a standstill at the important fortress town of Monterrey. Image File history File links US troops marching on Monterrey during the Mexican-American War, painting by Carl Nebel. ... The Mexican-American War was fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the Mexican city; for other uses, see Monterrey (disambiguation). ... Nuevo León (Spanish for New León, after the former kingdom in Spain) is a state located in north-eastern Mexico. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... Pedro de Ampudia (1803-1868) was born in Cuba and served Mexico as an army officer for most of his life. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Mexican-American War was fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... Pedro de Ampudia (1803-1868) was born in Cuba and served Mexico as an army officer for most of his life. ... ... This article is about the Mexican city; for other uses, see Monterrey (disambiguation). ...


After a number of embarrassing defeats and near misses, the Army of the North attempted to retreat south and refit before engaging the seemingly unbeatable US forces under General Zachary Taylor. Near the old fortress town of Monterrey, General Pedro de Ampudia received orders from Antonio López de Santa Anna to retreat further to the city of Saltillo where Ampudia was to establish a defensive line. But Ampudia, who was hungry for victory and conscious that his men were nearing mutiny through constantly being forced to retreat, refused the order and chose instead to make a stand at Monterrey. Joining Ampudia at this engagement were an elite artillery unit, the largely Irish-American San Patricios (or the Saint Patrick's Battalion), in their first major engagement against US forces. Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... Antonio López de Santa Anna Antonio López de Santa Anna Pérez de Lebrón (sometimes spelled de Santa Ana) (21 February 1794 – 21 June 1876) was a Mexican general and dictator. ... Saltillo is a city in northeast Mexico, located at 25°42′ N 101°00′ W. It is the current capital of the state of Coahuila. ... The Saint Patricks Battalion (Spanish: Batallón de San Patricio) was a battalion of U.S. troops who deserted and fought alongside the Mexican Army against the United States in the Mexican-American War of 1846 to 1848. ...


For three days, US forces attempted to take the city without success. Heavy Mexican resistance caused considerable losses in the US ranks, and the US artillery found itself incapable of penetrating the walls of the numerous fortresses and fortifications in the area. Finally, the invaders drew close enough to the city to use their only piece of siege artillery, a somewhat antiquated Napoleonic era 32-pound siege howitzer that began to hurl rounds into Monterrey's central plaza, panicking the local inhabitants. The Napoleonic Wars was a series of wars fought during Napoleon Bonapartes rule of France. ... Loading a WW1 British 15 in (381 mm) howitzer 155 mm M198 Howitzer A howitzer or hauwitzer is a type of field artillery. ...


On the night of the 23rd, a final US push to capture the city walls met with fierce resistance. The US line, near to cracking, began a somewhat disorganized retreat. At the same time, Zachary Taylor, determined to win the day, ordered his mortar to begin shelling indiscriminately. This act finally broke the back of the Mexican resistance and, with the US forces in full retreat, Ampudia ordered the white flag of surrender to be flown.


The resulting armistice signed between Taylor and Ampudia had major effects upon the outcome of the war. Taylor was lambasted by Washington, where President James K. Polk insisted that the US army had no authority to negotiate truces, only to "kill the enemy". In addition, his terms of armistice, which allowed Ampudia's forces to retreat with battle honors and all of their weapons, were seen as foolish and short-sighted by some US observers. James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ...


For his part, some have argued that Ampudia had sown the seeds of defeat for Mexico. Many Mexican soldiers became depressed and disenchanted. In a well fortified, excellently supplied position, an army of twelve thousand Mexican soldiers had nearly defeated the US Army, only to be forced to surrender at their moment of triumph. Many felt that their generals simply did not want to win, and desertions and mutiny became widespread problems.


See also

  • Battles of the Mexican-American War

The following are known Battles of the Mexican-American War. ...

References

  • Bauer, K. Jack. "The Mexican War, 1846-1848"

  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle of Monterrey - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (671 words)
The Battle of Monterrey (September 21–September 23, 1846) was an engagement in the Mexican-American War in which General Pedro de Ampudia and the Mexican Army of the North managed to fight U.S. troops to a temporary standstill at the important fortress town of Monterrey, but eventually they were forced to surrender their position.
Near the old fortress town of Monterrey, General Pedro de Ampudia received orders from Antonio López de Santa Anna to retreat further to the city of Saltillo, where Ampudia was to establish a defensive line.
Battle of Monterrey, Background, Battle, Aftermath, See also, References, 1846 in Mexico, Battles of the Mexican-American War, Battles of the Texas Ranger Division and History of Monterrey.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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