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Encyclopedia > Battle of Mobile Bay
Battle of Mobile Bay
Part of the American Civil War (Anaconda Plan)

Battle of Mobile Bay, by Louis Prang.
Date August 2-23, 1864
Location Mouth of Mobile Bay, off the coast of Alabama
Result Union victory
Combatants
United States of America
(U.S. Navy)
Confederate States
of America
(Confederate States Navy)
Commanders
David Farragut (navy)
Gordon Granger (army)
Franklin Buchanan (navy)
Dabney H. Maury (army)
Strength
14 wooden ships
(including 2 gunboats)
4 ironclad monitors
5,500 Land Force Troops
Three gunboats,
One ironclad,
2,000 Troops at Fort Morgan
Casualties
145 killed
170 wounded
1 ironclad sunk
7 Land Troops wounded
12 killed
20 wounded
123 captured
two gunboats and the ironclad captured
Fort Morgan:
one killed
three wounded
Map of Mobile Bay, 1861: shows Fort Gaines (lower center) on Dauphin Island, west of Fort Morgan, across the bay entrance.

The Battle of Mobile Bay was a naval battle fought on August 5, 1864, during the American Civil War. In addition to shutting down one of the two remaining Confederate ports, the other being Savannah, Georgia, this Union victory (together with the capture of Atlanta), was a significant boost for Abraham Lincoln's bid for re-election. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... 1861 Cartoon map of Scotts plan The Anaconda Plan was proposed in 1861 by Union General Winfield Scott to win the American Civil War with minimal loss of life, enveloping the Confederacy by blockade at sea and control of the Mississippi River. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Mobile Bay - Landsat photo Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 During a jubilee along the shores of Mobile Bay, blue crabs & flounder come to shallow water near shore Mobile Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, lying within the state of Alabama in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... USN redirects here. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Navy Department Seal The Confederate States Navy (CSN) was the naval branch of the Confederate States armed forces established by an act of the Confederate Congress on February 21, 1861 responsible for Confederate naval operations during the American Civil War. ... Admiral David Glasgow Farragut Admiral David Glasgow Farragut David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801 – August 14, 1870) was the senior officer of the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Gordon Granger (November 6, 1822 – January 10, 1876) was a Union Major General during American Civil War. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Franklin Buchanan Franklin Buchanan (September 13, 1800—May 11, 1874) was an officer in the U.S. Navy who became an admiral in the Confederate Navy during the American Civil War. ... Navy Department Seal The Confederate States Navy (CSN) was the naval branch of the Confederate States armed forces established by an act of the Confederate Congress on February 21, 1861 responsible for Confederate naval operations during the American Civil War. ... Dabney Herndon Maury was born in Fredricksburg, Virginia on May 21, 1822. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were ships sheathed with thick iron plates for protection. ... A monitor was a special form of warship, little more than a self-propelled floating artillery platform that could move close inshore and give its support to military operations on land. ... Combatants United States Confederate States Commanders Gordon Granger Charles D. Anderson Strength 3,300 818 Casualties  ? 818 surrendered The Siege of Fort Gaines occured during the American Civil War as part of the larger battle of Mobile Bay. ... Combatants United States Confederate States Commanders Gordon Granger Richard L. Page Strength 5,500 600 Casualties 3 killed and wounded 600 surrendered The Siege of Fort Morgan was part of the battle for Mobile Bay in 1864. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fort Gaines is a city located in Clay County, Georgia. ... Fort Morgan is a city located in Morgan County, Colorado. ... The French battleship Orient burns, 1 August 1798, during the Battle of the Nile A naval battle is a battle fought using ships or other waterborne vessels. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... This section may require cleanup to meet Wikipedias quality standards. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William T. Sherman, James B. McPherson, John M. Schofield, George H. Thomas Joseph E. Johnston; replaced in July by John B. Hood † Leonidas Polk Strength Military Division of the Mississippi (Army of the Cumberland, Army of the Ohio, Army of... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Battle

Commanding the Union forces was Admiral David Farragut, while Admiral Franklin Buchanan commanded the Confederate fleet. The battle took place off the coast of Alabama, at the mouth of Mobile Bay, which was defended by two Confederate forts, Fort Morgan and Fort Gaines, and by a torpedo field (in modern terms, naval mines) that created a single narrow channel for blockade runners to enter and exit the Bay. For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... Admiral David Glasgow Farragut Admiral David Glasgow Farragut David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801 – August 14, 1870) was the senior officer of the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. ... Franklin Buchanan Franklin Buchanan (September 13, 1800—May 11, 1874) was an officer in the U.S. Navy who became an admiral in the Confederate Navy during the American Civil War. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Mobile Bay - Landsat photo Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 During a jubilee along the shores of Mobile Bay, blue crabs & flounder come to shallow water near shore Mobile Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, lying within the state of Alabama in the United States. ... Fort Morgan, Mobile Point, Alabama, 1864, showing damage to the south side of the fort. ... Fort Gaines is a fort on Dauphin Island, Alabama, United States. ... The torpedo, historically called a locomotive torpedo, is a self-propelled explosive projectile weapon, launched above or below the water surface, propelled underwater toward a target, and designed to detonate on contact or in proximity to a target. ... Polish wz. ...


The biggest challenge for Farragut was entering the bay. With eighteen vessels, he commanded far greater firepower than the Confederate fleet of four. The Union fleet suffered the first major loss when the USS Tecumseh was critically damaged by an exploding torpedo after it wandered into the field. Within three minutes, the vessel was completely submerged. 94 men went down with the ship. Under fire from both the Confederate fleet and Fort Morgan, Farragut had to choose between retreating or risking the minefield. According to some accounts, he then issued his famous order, "Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!"[1] The first USS Tecumseh was an iron-hulled, single-turret monitor in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ...


Farragut took his flagship through the minefield safely, followed by the rest of the fleet. When Union fleet reached the bay, they defeated the Confederate flotilla led by the giant ironclad CSS Tennessee. Buchanan surrendered to Farragut aboard the USS Hartford. Over the next three weeks, a combined operation by the Navy and one Army division captured the forts defending the bay. Although the city of Mobile remained in Confederate hands, the last blockade-running port on the Gulf Coast east of the Mississippi was shut down. // CSS Tennessee, a slow-moving ironclad ram, was built at Selma, Alabama, where she was commissioned on February 16, 1864, Lieutenant James D. Johnston, CSN, in command. ... Two ships of the United States Navy have borne the name USS Hartford, named in honor of the Hartford, the capital of Connecticut. ...


Ships

Union Navy

14 wooden ships:

4 ironclad monitors: The first USS Brooklyn was a wooden screw sloop in the United States Navy. ... The first USS Kennebec was a gunboat in the United States Navy. ... The first Monongahela was a barkentine‑rigged screw sloop-of-war in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... The second USS Oneida was a screw sloop-of-war in the United States Navy. ... The second USS Richmond was a wooden steam sloop in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... The first USS Seminole was a sloop in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... USS Hartford, a sloop-of-war, was the first ship of the United States Navy named for Hartford, the capital of Connecticut. ... A flagship is the ship used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships. ... USS Galena, an ironclad screw steamer, was one of the first three ironclads, each of a different design, built by the Union Navy during the American Civil War. ... The second USS Metacomet was a wooden side-wheel steamer in the United States Navy during the mid 1800s. ... The first USS Lackawanna was a screw sloop-of-war in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... The first USS Ossipee was a wooden, screw sloop of war in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... The USS Port Royal was a United States Navy sidewheel steamer gunboat commissioned in 1862, active in the American Civil War, and decommissioned 1866. ... Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were ships sheathed with thick iron plates for protection. ... USS Monitor became the prototype of a form of ship built by several navies for coastal defence in the 1860s and 1870s and known as a monitor. ...

  • USS Tecumseh sunk by torpedo (2100-ton Canonicus-class monitor)
  • USS Manhattan (2100-ton Canonicus-class monitor)
  • USS Winnebago (1300-ton Milwaukee-class ironclad river monitor, twin-turrets)
  • USS Chickasaw (1300-ton Milwaukee-class ironclad river monitor, twin-turrets)

The first USS Tecumseh was an iron-hulled, single-turret monitor in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... The torpedo, historically called a locomotive torpedo, is a self-propelled explosive projectile weapon, launched above or below the water surface, propelled underwater toward a target, and designed to detonate on contact or in proximity to a target. ... The first USS Manhattan was built by Perine, Secor & Co. ... USS Winnebago was a Milwaukee-class double-turret monitor, named for a tribe of Sioux Indians that aided the US government during the Black Hawk War of 1832. ... The first Chickasaw was a monitor in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ...

Confederate Navy

1 ironclad: Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were ships sheathed with thick iron plates for protection. ...

3 gunboats // CSS Tennessee, a slow-moving ironclad ram, was built at Selma, Alabama, where she was commissioned on February 16, 1864, Lieutenant James D. Johnston, CSN, in command. ...

CSS Morgan was a partially armored gunboat of the Confederate States Navy in the U.S. Civil War. ... CSS Gaines was hastily constructed by the Confederates at Mobile, Alabama during 1861-62, from unseasoned wood which was partially covered with 2-inch iron plating. ... CSS Selma was a steamship in the Confederate States Navy during the American Civil War. ...

See also

Hernando de Soto of Spain is generally credited with the discovery of Mobile Bay in 1540, when he battled Chief Tuscaloosa and the Choctaw Indians for supplies. ... Combatants United States Confederate States Commanders Gordon Granger Richard L. Page Strength 5,500 600 Casualties 3 killed and wounded 600 surrendered The Siege of Fort Morgan was part of the battle for Mobile Bay in 1864. ...

References

  • Levin, Kevin M., "Mobile Bay", Encyclopedia of the American Civil War: A Political, Social, and Military History, Heidler, David S., and Heidler, Jeanne T., eds., W. W. Norton & Company, 2000, ISBN 0-393-04758-X.

Notes

  1. ^ Levin, p. 1344.

External links

  • See Fort Morgan and the Battle of Mobile Bay for a lesson on the Battle of Mobile Bay from the National Park Service's Teaching with Historic Places.
  • Paintings of the battle

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