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Encyclopedia > Battle of Glendale


Monday's fight. The battle of Charles City road.
Waud, Alfred R., artist, June 30, 1862.
Battle of Glendale
Conflict American Civil War
Date June 30, 1862
Place Henrico County, Virginia
Result Inconclusive (Union withdrawal continued.)
Combatants
United States of America Confederate States of America
Commanders
George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee
Strength
Armies Armies
Casualties
2,700 3,600
Peninsula Campaign
Hampton RoadsYorktownWilliamsburgEltham's LandingDrewry's BluffHanover CourthouseSeven PinesOak GroveBeaver Dam CreekGaines' MillGarnett's & Golding's FarmSavage's StationWhite Oak SwampGlendaleMalvern Hill


The Battle of Glendale, also known as the Battle of Nelson’s Farm, Frayser’s Farm, Charles City Crossroads, White Oak Swamp, New Market Road, or Riddell's Shop, took place on June 30, 1862 in Henrico County, Virginia as part of the Peninsula Campaign of the American Civil War.


This was the fifth of the Seven Days’ Battles. On June 30, Huger’s, Longstreet’s, and A.P. Hill’s divisions converged on the retreating Union army in the vicinity of Glendale or Frayser’s Farm. Longstreet’s and Hill’s attacks penetrated the Union defense near Willis Church, routing McCall’s division. McCall was captured. Union counterattacks by Hooker’s and Kearny’s divisions sealed the break and saved their line of retreat along the Willis Church Road. Huger’s advance was stopped on the Charles City Road. “Stonewall” Jackson’s divisions were delayed by Franklin at White Oak Swamp. Confederate Maj. Gen. T.H. Holmes made a feeble attempt to turn the Union left flank at Turkey Bridge but was driven back by Federal gunboats in James River. Union generals Meade and Sumner and Confederate generals Anderson, Pender, and Featherston were wounded. This was Lee’s best chance to cut off the Union army from the James River. That night, McClellan established a strong position on Malvern Hill.


References

  • CWSAC Battle Summaries, National Park Service (http://www2.cr.nps.gov/abpp/battles/bycampgn.htm)



  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle of Glendale (1472 words)
William B. Franklin was trying the best he could to keep the army in order, but in general the Union leaders on the battlefield had been privy to the same mis-intelligence McClellan had and all were concerned about an enemy that outnumbered them by 3-to-1.
McClellan was forced to defend Glendale mostly because of the condition of the roads on the peninsula.
Slocum's anticipated battle with Benjamin Huger never developed, so when Kearny's old brigade was ordered forward to support their former commander they literally ran into action, with the brigade commander's aide trying to catch them.
Battle of Glendale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (757 words)
The Battle of Glendale, also known as the Battle of Frayser’s Farm, Nelson’s Farm, Charles City Crossroads, New Market Road, or Riddell's Shop, took place on June 30, 1862, in Henrico County, Virginia, as part of the Seven Days Battles (Peninsula Campaign) of the American Civil War.
The battle was tactically inconclusive, although Lee failed to prevent the Federal escape.
Union generals McCall and Reynolds were both captured during the battle, after wandering into enemy lines in the dark; Union generals Meade and Edwin V. Sumner and Confederate generals Richard H. Anderson, Dorsey Pender, and Winfield S. Featherston were wounded.
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