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Encyclopedia > Battle of Gdynia
German battleship Schleswig-Holstein stationed at Danzig harbor is shelling nearby Polish positions at Gdynia.
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German battleship Schleswig-Holstein stationed at Danzig harbor is shelling nearby Polish positions at Gdynia.
Polish September Campaign
WesterplatteKrojanty • Lasy Królewskie • Mokra • Gdańsk Bay • Pszczyna • Mława • Jordanów • Borowa Góra • Mikołów • Węgierska Górka • Tuchola Forest • Tomaszów Mazowiecki • Wizna • Łódź • Piotrków • Różan • Radom • Łomża • Wola CyrusowaWarsawGdynia • Hel • Bzura • Jarosław • Kałuszyn • Węgrów • LwówModlin • Kobryń • Brześć • Kępa Oksywska • Tomaszów Lubelski • Wólka Węglowa • Kampinos Forest • Janów Lubelski, Wereszyca, and Hołosko • Krasnystaw • Grodno • Cześniki • Krasnobród • Władypol • SzackWytyczno • Parczew • Kock

Battle of Gdynia was one of the major battles in northern Poland during the Polish September Campaign. Germans main push towards Gdynia begun on 8 September and they captured Gdynia on 14 September. The Schleswig-Holstein, was a German battleship, that fought in both World Wars. ... For alternative meanings of Gdańsk and Danzig, see Gdansk (disambiguation) and Danzig (disambiguation) The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Combatants Poland Germany, Slovakia Soviet Union Commanders Edward Rydz-ÅšmigÅ‚y Fedor von Bock (Army Group North) Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group South) Strength 39 divisions, 16 brigades 4,300 guns 880 tanks 400 aircraft Total: 1,000,000[1] 56 German divisions, 4 brigades, 33+ Soviet divisions, 11+ brigades... Westerplatte Conflict Polish Defence War of 1939 Date September 1 to September 7, 1939 Place Westerplatte peninsula in Gdańsk Result ? Westerplatte is a peninsula in Gdańsk, at an estuary of the Dead Vistula (one of the Vistula delta estuaries), in the Gdańsk harbour channel. ... The Battle of Krojanty was part of the Polish September Campaign of the Second World War. ... Combatants Germany Poland Commanders Georg-Hans Reinhardt, Friedrich Kirchner Julian Filipowicz Strength 2 panzer divisions, infantry division cavalry brigade, elements of one infantry division Casualties ca. ... Battle of the GdaÅ„sk Bay took place on September 1, 1939, shortly after the outbreak of the Polish Defensive War. ... Battle of Pszczyna (Polish: Bitwa PszczyÅ„ska) refers to the series of battles on 1 and 2 September 1939 near the town of Pszczyna during the Polish September Campaign. ... The Battle of MÅ‚awa, otherwise known as the Defence of the MÅ‚awa position, took place to the north of the town of MÅ‚awa in northern Poland between September 1 and September 3, 1939. ... Combatants Poland Germany Commanders StanisÅ‚aw Maczek Ewald von Kleist Strength 1 motorized brigade reinforced with infantry 2 Panzer divisions, 1 infantry division Casualties {{{notes}}} The Battle of Jordanów took place on September 2, 1939, during the Polish Defensive War and the opening stages of World War II. It... Battle of Wizna Conflict Polish Defence War of 1939 Date September 7-September 10, 1939 Place Wizna near Poland Result unconcluded Battle of Wizna (sometimes referred to as the Polish Thermopylae) was fought between September 6 and September 10, 1939, between the forces of Poland and Germany during the initial... The Battle of Łódź was fought on September 8, 1939, between Poland and Germany. ... Battle of Radom. ... Battle of Warsaw Conflict Polish Defence War of 1939 Date 8 to September 28, 1939 Place Warsaw, Poland Result Polish defeat The 1939 Battle of Warsaw was fought between the Polish Warsaw Army (Armia Warszawa) garrisoned and entrenched in the capital of Poland (Warsaw) and the German Army. ... Battle of Bzura (also known as Battle of Kutno) took place during the Second World War, Polish September Campaign between 9 September 1939 and 19 September1, 1939 and was fought between Polish and German Nazi forces. ... Combatants Germany, Soviet Union Poland Commanders Ferdinand Schörner, Filip Golikov WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Langner, StanisÅ‚aw Sikorski Casualties unknown unknown The Battle of Lwów (sometimes called the Siege of Lwów) was a battle for the control over the Polish city of Lwów between the Polish Army... Battle of Modlin Conflict Polish Defence War of 1939 Date September 13 to September 29, 1939 Place Modlin village, Modlin Fortress Result Polish capitulation During the Polish September Campaign at the beginning of the Second World War, Modlin Fortress was a headquarters of the Modlin Army until it retreated eastwards. ... Battle of KobryÅ„ was one of the battles of the Polish Defence War of 1939. ... Battle of Brześć Litewski (otherwise known as the Siege of Brześć, Battle of Brest-Litovsk or simply Battle of Brześć) was a World War II battle that took place between September 14 and September 17, 1939, near the town of Brześć Litewski (now Brest, Belarus). ... Battle of Tomaszów Lubelski took place from 17th September to 26th September 1939 near the town of Tomaszów Lubelski. ... The Battle of Grodno took place between September 21 and September 24, 1939, during the Polish Defensive War. ... The Battle of Krasnobród took place on September 23, 1939 near the town of Krasnobród. ... Battle of Szack Conflict Polish Defence War of 1939 Date September 28, 1939 Place Szack, Poland Result Polish victory Battle of Szack was one of the major battles between the Polish Army and the Red Army fought during the Polish Defence War of 1939. ... The battle of Wytyczno took place on October 1, 1939 near the village of Wytyczno near WÅ‚odawa in Poland. ... The Battle of Kock was the final battle of the Polish September Campaign at the beginning of World War II. It took place from October 2nd through October 5th, 1939, near the town of Kock, Poland. ... Combatants Poland Germany, Slovakia Soviet Union Commanders Edward Rydz-ÅšmigÅ‚y Fedor von Bock (Army Group North) Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group South) Strength 39 divisions, 16 brigades 4,300 guns 880 tanks 400 aircraft Total: 1,000,000[1] 56 German divisions, 4 brigades, 33+ Soviet divisions, 11+ brigades...


Before the battle

Gdynia was a major civilian and military port on the Baltic Sea, and an important industrial centre of the Second Polish Republic. Its defence was one of the key elements in the Polish defence plan. One of Polish armies, Armia Pomorze had the orders to prevent German forces from breaking through the Polish Corridor and linking main Germany with Prussia and to defend Gdynia, Hel and Kępa Oksywska and Oksywie. Gdynia (pronounce: [:gdiɲia], German: Gdingen/Gotenhafen, Kashubian/Pomeranian: Gdiniô) is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodship of Poland and an important seaport at Gdansk Bay on the south coast of the Baltic Sea. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ... Second Polish Republic 1921-1939 The Second Polish Republic is an unofficial name applied to the Republic of Poland between World War I and World War II. When the borders of the state were fixed in 1921, it had an area of 388. ... A Polish map showing the territory known as the Polish Corridor The Polish Corridor was the name given to a strip of territory which was transferred from Germany to Poland by the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. ... The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (Old Prussian: PrÅ«sa, German: Preußen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: PrÅ«sai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad... HEL can mean: Helsinki-Vantaa Airport High energy laser (weapon) This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Oksywie in early 20th century Oksywie (German: ) is a neighbourhood of the city of Gdynia. ...


The forces defending Gdynia were grouped under Land Coastal Defence (Lądowa Obrona Wybrzeża), commanded by Colonel Stanisław Dąbek (land forces) and Captain Stanisław Frankowski (naval forces). Polish plan foresaw that Germans would manage to cut off Gdynia from main forces of Armia Pomorze, therefore Land Coastal Defence was prepared for individual operations and was reassigned from Armia Pomorze to Polish Navy, and Stanisław Dąbek received orders directly from counter-admiral Józef Unrug. Polish Navy would support the coastal defence with 1 destroyer (3 others evacuated Baltic Sea during Plan Peking), 1 heavy mine-layer and several submarines and smaller surface ships. PuÅ‚kownik (literarily Regimentary, abbrev. ... Flag of the Polish Navy Polish Navy Ensign The Polish Navy (Marynarka Wojenna RP, MW RP) is the branch of Polands armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Józef Unrug Vice Admiral Józef Unrug (1884-1973) was a German-born Polish naval officer who helped to reestablish Polands Navy after World War I. He served as commander of the Polish Navy during the opening stages of the World War II. Biography Józef MichaÅ‚ Hubert...


On 1st September, Polish Land Coastal Defence force had the strenght of approximately 17,000 (increased from about 5,000 two months earlier), with 40 artillery pieces (including 8 anti-aircraft), 34 mortars and granade launchers and approx. 400 machine guns. Infantry units were placed:

  • west and Wejherowo:
  • south of Gdynia, at Redłowo
  • at Kartuzy
  • at Koleczkowo
  • at Gdynia and Kępa Oksywska

German forces tasked with the capture of Gdynia were commanded by General Leonard von Kaupisch and formed part of Army Group North under General Fedor von Bock. They were approximately 29,000 strong, with over 300 artillery pieces, 70 mortars and grenade launchers and 700 machine guns. German Navy (Kriegsmarine) in the area consisted of 2 old battleships, 3 cruisers, 10 destroyers and several smaller units. Approximately 120 Luftwaffe planes were supporting the German forces. Coat of arms of Wejherowo Flag of Wejherowo Wejherowo (Polish: formerly Wejherowo, Kashubian/Pomeranian: Wejrowò, German: Neustadt in Westpreußen), is a city in Eastern Pomerania, northern Poland, with 46,900 inhabitants (2005). ... Kartuzy (Kashubian/Pomeranian: Kartuzë; see also Cities alternative names) is a town in the Kashubia or Eastern Pomerania region, northwestern Poland, with some 16,000 inhabitants. ... Army Group North (Heeresgruppe Nord in German) was a high level command grouping of military units operating for Germany during World War II. The army group coordinated the operations of attached army corps, reserve formations, and direct-reporting units. ... Generalfeldmarschall Fedor von Bock Fedor von Bock (December 3, 1880 - May 4, 1945) was a German field marshal during World War II. He was born in Küstrin, Germany. ... The Kriegsmarine (or War Navy) was the name of the German Navy between 1935 and 1945, during the Nazi regime, superseding the Reichsmarine. ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or (German: Air Arm, IPA: [luftvafə]) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ...


The battle

The German offensive isolated the Polish coast from the Polish mainland between 4 and 8 September, and Armia Pomorze was forced to retreat south-east. Units of Land Coastal Defence has been engaged by the German forces from 1 September, although it was not until the second week of the war that the Germans would begin a direct assault on the Polish port of Gdynia.


The German Navy, operating in the area with the battleship Schleswig-Holstein and smaller units shelled Polish positions, but with limited effect and prevented from closing on the coast by Polish coastal batteries. The Schleswig-Holstein, was a German battleship, that fought in both World Wars. ... In military science, a battery is a group of artillery or cannon, so grouped in order to facilitate battlefield communication and the organization of barrages. ...


The German land offensive was much more successful. German forces established a connection between Germany and Prussia by 4 September. After heavy fighting near Kartuzy (5 September), their main attack towards Gdynia began on 8 September, and after intense fighting near Puck and Wejherowo (8 September) step by step the Poles were forced back towards the sea. See Puck (mythology), a nature spirit Puck (comics), a diminuitive superhero in Marvel Comics Puck (Shakespeare), from A Midsummer Nights Dream Hockey puck, the ball used to play ice hockey Puck (moon), a moon of Uranus Puck, Poland, a town in Poland Puck, a character in the Japanese anime... Coat of arms of Wejherowo Flag of Wejherowo Wejherowo (Polish: formerly Wejherowo, Kashubian/Pomeranian: Wejrowò, German: Neustadt in Westpreußen), is a city in Eastern Pomerania, northern Poland, with 46,900 inhabitants (2005). ...


When Polish positions outside Gdynia were overrun, and in view of the retreat of the Armia Pomorze, on 10 September Colonel Dąbek decided to abandon Gdynia in order to avoid civilian casualties during the city fighting, and thus on 12 September he ordered all Polish units to retreat from Gdynia toward Kępa Oksywska, a fragment of the coast near Puck Bay. On 11 and 12 September the fights near Mechlinki transformed into an incessant two-day battle, after which Polish troops had to retreat again. Bay of Puck or Puck Bay (Polish: Zatoka Pucka) is a shallow western part of the Bay of Gdansk in the southern Baltic Sea, off the shores of Polish land of Gdansk Pomerania. ...


The Germans captured Gdynia on 14 September. Kępa Oksywska was not prepared for siege or provisioned for the approximately 9,000 strong remaining Polish forces and in the battle of Kępa Okswyska the Poles sustained heavy losses (approximately 2,000). After a last failed counterattack on 19 September, Colonel Dąbek, who participated in the frontline battle and was wounded, decided to issue order to surrender and committed suicide after giving the order to cease fire. A frontline is a line of confrontation in an armed conflict, most often a war. ... An armistice is the effective end of a war, when the warring parties agree to stop fighting. ...


The Polish Navy was tasked to provide support to Gdynia through Plan Worek (submarine operations) and Operation Rurka (mining sea approaches). These plans did not prevent defeat. Flag of the Polish Navy Polish Navy Ensign The Polish Navy (Marynarka Wojenna RP, MW RP) is the branch of Polands armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... German UC-1 class World War I submarine A model of Gunter Priens Unterseeboot 47 (U-47), German WWII Type VII diesel-electric hunter-killer (SSK) submarine Typhoon class ballistic-missile carrying (SSBN) submarine, compared to a man USS Virginia, a Virginia-class nuclear attack (SSN) submarine A submarine... The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine This article is about mineral extraction. ...


Quote

  • Polish soldiers fought gallantly, and they did not spare blood. The area of Gdynia and Danzig was defended by the elite of the Polish armed forces. Those were young and inspired units of the navy and army, which fought admirably. On the plateau of Oxhöft we found trenches filled with dead Polish soldiers, who fell by hundreds where they fought, with the rifles still in their hands. It was apparent, that they fought to the bitter end. from F. O. Busch, Unsere Kriegsmarine im Polnischen Feldzug[1]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gdynia Guide (391 words)
Gdynia is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodship of Poland and an important seaport at Gdansk Bay on the south coast of the Baltic Sea.
In 1870 the village of Gdynia had some 1200 inhabitants, and it was not a poor fishing village as it is sometimes described.
The Naval Museum displays armaments and sea battle equipment dating from the 16th century, especially worth seeing are the planes and helicopters, weapons and heavy armaments as well as medieval gun - carriages.
Battle of Krojanty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (741 words)
The battle took place near the village of Krojanty in Pomerania (7 kilometres from the town of Chojnice) on September 1, 1939.
Polish units were engaged in battle from 0500 against elements of German 76th Infantry Regiment of 20th Motorised Division under Lt.Gen. Mauritz von Wiktorin, which operated on the left (northern) flank of XIX Panzer Corps under Gen. Heinz Guderian.
However, the sounds of the battle notified the crews of the APCs stationed nearby, and soon the Polish unit came under heavy machine gun fire.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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