FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Battle of Crug Mawr
Battle of Crug Mawr
Part of the Norman campaigns in Wales

Date: October, 1136
Location: Crug Mawr, two miles from Cardigan
Result: Decisive Welsh victory
Casus belli:
Territory changes:
Combatants
Welsh forces from Gwynedd and Deheubarth Norman forces from all the South Wales lordships
Commanders
Owain Gwynedd Robert Fitz Martin (???)
Strength
Several thousand Several thousand
Casualties
Said to be light Heavy
{{{notes}}}

The Battle of Crug Mawr took place in September or October 1136, as part of a struggle for control of Ceredigion which had been captured by the Normans. Look up October in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Events Completion of the Saint Denis Basilica in Paris Peter Abelard writes the Historia Calamitatum, detailing his relationship with Heloise People of Novgorod rebel against the hereditary prince Vsevolod and depose him Births Amalric I of Jerusalem William of Newburgh, English historian (died 1198) Deaths November 15 - Margrave Leopold III... Casus belli is a Latin expression from the international law theory of Jus ad bellum. ... Gwynedd was one of the kingdoms or principalities of medieval Wales. ... Deheubarth was a south-western kingdom or principality of medieval Wales. ... Events Completion of the Saint Denis Basilica in Paris Peter Abelard writes the Historia Calamitatum, detailing his relationship with Heloise People of Novgorod rebel against the hereditary prince Vsevolod and depose him Births Amalric I of Jerusalem William of Newburgh, English historian (died 1198) Deaths November 15 - Margrave Leopold III... For other uses please see Ceredigion (disambiguation) Ceredigion is a county in Wales. ...


A Welsh revolt against Norman rule had begun in south Wales, where on 1 January 1136 the Welsh won a victory over the local Norman forces between Loughor and Swansea, killing about 500 of their opponents. Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare, the Norman lord of Ceredigion, had been away from his lordship in the early part of the year. Returning to the borders of Wales in April, he ignored warnings of the danger and pressed on towards Ceredigion with a small force. He had not gone far when he was ambushed and killed by the men of Iorwerth ab Owain, grandson of Caradog ap Gruffydd (the penultimate prince of Gwent). Norman may refer to: the Normans, the Norman people. ... Loughor (Welsh: Casllwchwr) is a town in the city of Swansea, traditional county of Glamorgan, south Wales. ... Swansea (Welsh: Abertawe, mouth of the Tawe) is a city and county in South Wales, situated on the coast immediately to the east of the Gower Peninsula. ... Son of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare and Alice (Adeliza) de Claremont. ... Caradog ap Gruffydd (died 1081) was a prince of Gwent in south-east Wales who made repeated attempts to gain power over all of southern Wales by seizing Deheubarth. ...


The news of Richard's death led to an invasion by the forces of Gwynedd, led by Owain Gwynedd and Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd, sons of the king of Gwynedd, Gruffydd ap Cynan. They captured a number of castles in northern Ceredigion before returning home to dispose of the plunder. Around Michaelmas they again invaded Ceredigion and made an alliance with Gruffydd ap Rhys of Deheubarth. The combined forces headed for Cardigan. These troops were said to include hundreds of armoured horsemen, a style of warfare which the Welsh had learnt from the Normans. Gwynedd was one of the kingdoms or principalities of medieval Wales. ... Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd (died 1172) was the third son of Gruffydd ap Cynan, King of Gwynedd and younger brother of Owain Gwynedd. ... Gruffydd ap Cynan (c. ... Michaelmas (pronounced ) or the Feast of Ss. ... Gruffydd ap Rhys c. ... Deheubarth was a south-western kingdom or principality of medieval Wales. ... Cardigan could refer to any of the following: the cardigan sweater Cardigan, a town in Wales Cardiganshire, a Welsh county Cardigan, an electoral district in Canada the Cardigan Welsh Corgi, a breed of dog Lord Cardigan, charge of the Light Brigade The Cardigans, a Swedish pop group This is a...


The Battle

At Crug Mawr, two miles outside Cardigan, the Welsh forces were confronted by Norman troops drawn from all the lordships of South Wales. The Normans were led by Robert fitzMartin, lord of Cemais, Stephen, constable of Cardigan Castle and William and Maurice fitzGerald, uncles of Gerald of Windsor. Cardigan Castle, (ca. ...


After some hard fighting, the Norman forces were put to flight and pursued as far as the River Teifi. Many of the fugitives tried to cross the bridge, which broke under the weight, with hundreds said to have drowned, clogging the river with the bodies of men and horses. Others fled to the town of Cardigan, which however was taken and burned by the Welsh. River Teifi is a river in West Wales flowing into the sea below Cardigan town. ...


Aftermath

Ceredigion, which had been part of Deheubarth before the Normans had conquered it, was now annexed by Gwynedd as the more powerful member of the coalition. Years later, Rhys ap Gruffydd of Deheubarth was able to win it back. Rhys ap Gruffydd (1132–28 April 1197) was the ruler of the kingdom of Deheubarth (South Wales) from 1155 until his death. ...


The battle was a significant setback to Norman expansion in Wales. Owain Gwynedd became king of Gwynedd on the death of his father the following year, and further expanded the borders of the kingdom. In Deheubarth, Gruffydd ap Rhys died in uncertain circumstances in 1137, and this enabled the Normans to recover their position in the south.


References

John Edward Lloyd (1911) A history of Wales from the earliest times to the Edwardian conquest (Longmans, Green & Co.) Sir John Edward Lloyd (who wrote as J E Lloyd) (1861-1947) was Wales greatest historian, the author of the first serious history of the countrys formative years, A History of Wales from the Earliest Times to the Edwardian Conquest (1911). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kingdom of Gwynedd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1517 words)
Trahaearn was defeated and killed at the Battle of Mynydd Carn and Gruffydd again ruled Gwynedd briefly.
Gruffydd ruled until his death in 1137, and though he himself had become to old to lead the forces of Gwynedd by about 1120, his sons Cadwallon, Owain Gwynedd and Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd were able to extend Gwynedd's borders eastwards at the expense both of the Normans and of Powys.
In 1136 they defeated the Normans at the Battle of Crug Mawr near Cardigan, and Ceredigion, traditionally a part of Deheubarth, was annexed to Gwynedd.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m