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Encyclopedia > Battle of Churubusco
Battle of Churubusco
Part of the Mexican-American War

The Battle of Churubusco by Carl Nebel. Oil on canvas, 1851.
Date August 20, 1847
Location Mexico City, D.F.
Result U.S. victory
Combatants
United States Mexico
Commanders
Winfield Scott Antonio López de Santa Anna
Manuel Rincón
Strength
8,497 2,641
Casualties
133 dead
865 wounded
40 missing
263 dead
1,261 captured 20 missing. Captured was Gens. Rincon, Anaya & Acting Gen.Ramirez Arellano.7 guns & 2 flags were taken.
Mexican–American War
Fort TexasPalo AltoResaca de la Palma – Cañoncito – Santa FeMonterrey – 1st Tabasco – Siege of Los AngelesBattle of Dominguez RanchoSan PasqualEl BrazitoRio San GabrielLa Mesa – Cañada – MoraEmbudo PassPueblo de TaosBuena Vista – Sacramento – VeracruzCerro GordoTuxpan – 2nd Tabasco – ContrerasChurubuscoMolino del ReyChapultepecMexico CityHuamantlaPuebla

The Battles of Churubusco took place on August 20, 1847, in the immediate aftermath of the Battle of Contreras (Padierna) during the Mexican-American War. The defeat of the Mexican army at Churubusco left the U.S. Army only 5 miles (8 km) away from Mexico City. Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 18,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded... Image File history File links Battlechurubusco. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: , Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ... The Mexican Federal District, known in Spanish as Distrito Federal (D.F.), is an area within Mexico that is not part of any of the Mexican states, but an independent self-governing city-state and the seat of the Federal Government. ... For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ... Antonio de Padua María Severino López de Santa Anna y Pérez de Lebrón (21 February 1794 – 21 June 1876), also known simply as Santa Anna, was a Mexican political leader who greatly influenced early Mexican and Spanish politics and government, first fighting against independence from Spain... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 18,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded... The Siege of Fort Texas marked the beginning of active campaigning by the armies of the United States of America and Mexico during the Mexican-American War. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Mariano Arista Strength 2,400 infantry 2,300 infantry, 1,100 cavalry and 160 artillery 12 guns Casualties 5 killed 43 wounded 102 killed 129 wounded 26 missing The Battle of Palo Alto was the first major battle of the Mexican-American War... At the Battle of Resaca de la Palma, one of the early engagements of the Mexican-American War, Zachary Taylor engaged the retreating forces of the Mexican Army of the North under Gen. ... In the beginning of the Mexican-American War, Stephen W. Kearny brought 1,700 soldiers from Kansas in the contested Indian territory to conquer the New Mexico territory. ... Battle of Santa Fe Conflict Mexican-American War Date August 15, 1846 Place Santa Fe, New Mexico Result U.S. victory The Battle of Santa Fe occurred on August 15, 1846 during the Mexican-American War. ... The Battle of Monterrey (September 21–September 23, 1846) was an engagement in the Mexican-American War in which General Pedro de Ampudia and the Mexican Army of the North managed to fight US troops to a standstill at the important fortress town of Monterrey. ... The First Battle of Tabasco was fought during the Mexican-American War. ... The Terra Cotta relief on the current Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial Fort Moore was a historic fort in Los Angeles, California, during the Mexican-American War. ... Well, Mexican-American, was a very long war; it lasted for two whole years. ... The Battle of San Pascual was a military encounter that occurred during the Mexican_American War in what is now San Diego County, California, on the 6 and 7 December 1846. ... In October, 1846, Colonel Alexander Doniphan, a Kentucky-born lawyer, was chosen as commander of the first regiment of Mounted Missouri Volunteers. ... Combatants United States of America Mexico Californeros Commanders Robert F. Stockton Stephen Watts Kearny José Mariá Flores Strength U.S. naval and army forces 600 sailors, marines and dragoons Californios sympathic to Mexico 300 dragoons 200 soldiers Casualties 143 80 The Battle of Rio San Gabriel was a part of... The Battle of La Mesa occurred on January 9, 1847 in present-day Vernon, in which the outgunned and outnumbered Californios (The Americans having rifles, the Californios fighting on horseback with only lances)almost gained the advantage, but they fell back and camped at present-day Pasadena, giving up Los... Insurgents in New Mexico under the leadership of Pablo Chavez, Pablo Montoya and Jesus Tafoya began marching south towards the American-held city of Santa Fe. ... Combatants United States Mexican Insurgents Commanders Israel R. Hendley Jesse I. Morin Manuel Cortez Strength 80 200 Casualties 1 killed 3 wounded 25 killed 17 prisoners The Battle of Mora was part of the Taos Revolt, a popular insurrection against the United States. ... Combatants United States Mexican/Indian Insurgents Commanders John Burgwin Ceran St. ... The Siege of Pueblo de Taos was an engagement between U.S. forces and Insurgent forces in New Mexico during the Mexican-American War. ... The Battle of Buena Vista was a land battle of the Mexican-American War fought on 23 February 1847 in Buena Vista, Coahuila, seven miles (12 km) south of Saltillo, in northern Mexico. ... The Battle of the Sacramento took place during the Mexican-American War. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott (Army) David Conner (Navy) Matthew C. Perry (Navy) Juan Morales Strength 12,000 3,360 Casualties 18 killed 62 wounded 180 killed and wounded 100 civilian The Battle of Veracruz was a 20-day siege of the key Mexican seaport of Veracruz, Veracruz... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Antonio López de Santa Anna Strength 8,500 12,000 Casualties 417 4,000 Gen Ciriaco Vasquez dead Gens. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Matthew C. Perry Martin Perfecto de Cos Strength 1,519 400 Casualties 3 killed 11 wounded  ? The Battle of Tuxpan was a battle fought during the Mexican-American War. ... The Second Battle of Tabasco (also known as the Battle of Villahermosa) was a battle fought during the Mexican-American War as part of the U.S. blockade of Mexican Gulf ports. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Antonio López de Santa Anna Gabriel Valencia Strength 8,500 20,000 Casualties 60 killed and wounded 700 killed 843 surrendered Gen Frontera dead Gen Salas, Nicolas Mendoza captured The Battle of Contreras (also known, particularly in Mexico, as the Battle of... The Battle of Molino del Rey turned out to be one of the bloodiest fights of the Mexican-American War. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Nicolás Bravo # Strength 13,000 876 cadets, 4000 regulars Casualties 130 killed 703 wounded 29 missing 862 total 1,800 killed and wounded 823 captured 2,623 Total Gen. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Antonio López de Santa Anna Strength 7,200 16,000 Casualties 1,651 4,500 The Battle for Mexico City refers to the series of engagements from September 8 to September 15, 1847 in the general vicinity of Mexico City during the... The Battle of Huamantla was a U.S. victory late in the Mexican-American War that forced the Mexican army to lift the Siege of Puebla. ... The Siege of Puebla began the same day Mexico City fell to Winfield Scott and lasted for 28 days when a relief force was able to fight its way into the city and lift the siege. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Antonio López de Santa Anna Gabriel Valencia Strength 8,500 20,000 Casualties 60 killed and wounded 700 killed 843 surrendered Gen Frontera dead Gen Salas, Nicolas Mendoza captured The Battle of Contreras (also known, particularly in Mexico, as the Battle of... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 18,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded... Churubusco is a neighbourhood of Mexico City. ... The United States Army is the largest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: , Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ...

Contents

Background

Following their defeat at Contreras and San Antonio, the Mexicans fell back to the village of Churubusco. After taking San Antonio,the Mexican defenders of which (1st Line of Defense or sometimes the "Army of the Centre" Gen. N. Bravo, with about 2,000 men : 700 "Hidalgo" ,500 "Victoria" Natl. Guards Battalions, 800 others: under Cols. A. Zerecero & J. G. Perdigon Garay), were struck by the Clark American Brigade. They lost about 500 prisoners, including Acting Gen. Perdigon Garay & about 8 guns.The U.S. forces began to merge with the forces from Contreras for a further attack there. Magdalena Contreras is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ...


The Mexicans made their stand at the Franciscan convent of Santa María de Churubusco. Although the convent offering no advantage of height over the surrounding terrain, there was a small river, crossed by a bridge, that the U.S. forces would have to negotiate first. In addition to the stone walls of the convent, the defenses included a series of incomplete trenches the Mexicans began digging prior to the attack. The defenders numbered 1,300 men from the Independencia and Bravos battalions (90% of whom had never seen combat) and the Saint Patrick's Battalion (the San Patricios). There were some elements of the Tlapa & Lagos Battalions sent as reinforcements.They also had seven cannon. The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... The Saint Patricks Battalion (Spanish: Batallón de San Patricio) was a unit of several hundred Irishmen, Germans, Scotsmen and other European Catholics who deserted the United States Army and fought as part of the Mexican Army against the United States in the Mexican-American War of 1846 to...


Three cannon were placed on the right; two in the center; and the remaining two on the left. Independencia was assigned to defend the upper walls, the right flank leading to the bridge, the unfortified south and north sides, and two adobe huts further forward on the battlefield. The Bravos and the San Patricios were stationed on the left, behind barricades. In support along the Rio Churubusco was the Perez Brigade : 2,500 men (11th Line, 1st, 3d & 4th Light Infantry Regiments) “Flanking” redirects here. ...


Battle

The first assault by the 6,000-strong U.S. force under William J. Worth and David E. Twiggs was successfully repulsed. Pedro María Anaya, second in command to General Manuel Rincón, managed to repell a particularly fierce attack on the left flank. Just as the bridge looked likely to fall to the invaders, three small groups of militia arrived to reinforce the defenders. Intense fire continued for three or four hours, until Independencia — in spite of a series of urgent messages dispatched behind the lines — ran out of ammunition. This lack of ammunition was due to the fact that the provided calibers were not for the rifles used by the defenders. If the ammunition have had the correct caliber it is presumed that the defenders could have been resisted a bit longer. William Jenkins Worth was a United States general during the Mexican-American War Early Life Worth was born on March 1, 1794 in Hudson, New York. ... Brigadier General David E. Twiggs David Emanuel Twiggs (1790 – July 15, 1862) was a United States soldier during the War of 1812 and Mexican-American War and a general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... Pedro María Anaya (1794-1854) was interim president of Mexico from 1847 to 1848. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an organization of citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ...


Two of the Mexican cannon had melted and a third had fallen from its mount. Lieutenant Colonel Francisco Peñúñuri of Independencia led a handful of men in a bayonet charge and was defeated. He and Captain Luis Martínez de Castro, who had accompanied him, were later interred with full military honors in a monument at the convent gates. The US Marine Corps OKC-3S Bayonet A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife- or dagger-shaped weapon designed to fit on or over the muzzle of a rifle barrel or similar weapon. ...


Officers from the Bravos attempted to raise the white flag over the convent walls on three occasions. They were prevented from doing so, however, by members of the San Patricios who feared the fate that awaited them if they were taken prisoner. Seventy-two[citation needed] were ultimately captured and court-martialed for desertion, including their leader, Jon Riley. German troops after surrendering to the U.S. Third Army carry the white flag (WW2 photo). ... Jon Riley, also known as John ORiley, (1805-1850) A US Army lieutenant, had been one of the estimated 800 immigrant Irishmen who had deserted the US Army to fight for Mexico in the 1846-48 war. ...


U.S. Infantry Captain James M. Smith mounted the convent wall and raised the white flag of surrender in order to discourage his troops from excesses as they entered the defenseless convent. Arriving some minutes later, General Twiggs saluted the Mexican commanders with military decorum and asked General Anaya to hand over his ammunition. Anaya is reputed to have replied, "If I had any ammunition, you would not be here." James Milton Smith (October 24, 1823 – November 26, 1890) was a Confederate infantry colonel in the American Civil War, as well as a post-war Governor of Georgia. ...


Aftermath

A brigade of volunteers from New York was billeted to the convent, remaining there until September 7. When they withdrew, they took with them as much booty from the church as they could carry, desecrated the buildings, and destroyed the kitchen garden. NY redirects here. ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Following their victory at Churubusco, Scott's army was only five miles (8 km) away from Mexico City. A month later, following an abortive ceasefire and failed negotiations, Mexico City fell to U.S. forces. Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Antonio López de Santa Anna Strength 7,200 16,000 Casualties 1,651 4,500 The Battle for Mexico City refers to the series of engagements from September 8 to September 15, 1847 in the general vicinity of Mexico City during the...


In the Arts

Parts of the Battle were portrayed in the mini-series, North and South.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle of Churubusco - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (647 words)
The Battles of Churubusco took place on August 20, 1847, in the immediate aftermath of the Battle of Contreras (Padierna) during the Mexican-American War.
The defeat of the Mexican army at Churubusco left the U.S. Army only 5 miles (8 km) away from Mexico City.
Following their victory at Churubusco, Scott's army was now only five miles (8 km) away from Mexico City.
Battle of Chapultepec - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1517 words)
The Battle of Chapultepec took place in September 1847 during the Mexican-American War, at Chapultepec Castle on Chapultepec Hill, guarding the western approach to Mexico City.
On September 8 in the costly battle of Molino del Rey, U.S. forces had managed to drive the Mexicans from their positions near the base of Chapultepec Castle guarding Mexico City from the west.
George Pickett (later famous for "Pickett's Charge" and the Battle of Five Forks during the American Civil War) was the first American to top the wall of the fort and the Voltiguers soon planted their flag on the parapet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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