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Encyclopedia > Battle of Chickamauga
Battle of Chickamauga
Part of the American Civil War

Battle of Chickamauga, lithograph by Kurz and Allison, 1890.
Date September 18September 20, 1863
Location Catoosa County and Walker County, Georgia
Result Confederate victory
Combatants
United States of America Confederate States of America
Commanders
William S. Rosecrans
George H. Thomas
Braxton Bragg
James Longstreet
Strength
Army of the Cumberland (56,965) Army of Tennessee (70,000)
Casualties
16,170 (1,657 killed, 9,756 wounded, 4,757 captured/missing) 18,454 (2,312 killed, 14,674 wounded, 1,468 captured/missing)

The Battle of Chickamauga, fought September 18 to September 20, 1863, marked the end of a Union offensive in south-central Tennessee and northwestern Georgia called the Chickamauga Campaign. The battle was the most significant Union defeat in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 581 pixel Image in higher resolution (1781 × 1293 pixel, file size: 1,011 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) TITLE: Battle of Chickamauga--Sept. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Catoosa County is a county located in the Georgia. ... Walker County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... William Starke Rosecrans (September 6, 1819 - March 11, 1898), nicknamed Old Rosy, served as an American military officer. ... General George H. Thomas George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816 – March 28, 1870), the Rock of Chickamauga, was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general during the American Civil War. ... Braxton Bragg Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army, a principal commander in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ... James Longstreet (January 8, 1821 – January 2, 1904) was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War, the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his Old War Horse. ... The Battle of Chattanooga II was a battle in the American Civil War, beginning on August 21, 1863, as the opening battle in the Chickamauga Campaign. ... The Battle of Davis Cross Roads, also known as the Battle of Dug Gap, was fought on September 10–11, 1863, in northwestern Georgia, as part of the Chickamauga Campaign of the American Civil War. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Western Theater Overview (1861 – 1865) This article presents an overview of major military and naval operations in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


The battle was fought between the Union Army of the Cumberland under Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans and the Confederate Army of Tennessee under General Braxton Bragg, and was named for the (now South) Chickamauga Creek, which flows into the Tennessee River about 3.5 miles (5.6km) northeast of downtown Chattanooga. Chickamauga was a local Indian word meaning "Stagnant River" or, less accurately, "River of Death," usage that may have begun after the battle.[1] Union army in the west during the American Civil War, commanded at various times by Generals Robert Anderson, Don Carlos Buell, William S. Rosecrans, and George Thomas. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... William Starke Rosecrans (September 6, 1819 – March 11, 1898) was an inventor, coal-oil company executive, diplomat, politician, and U.S. Army officer. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ... The Army of Tennessee was formed in November 1862. ... Braxton Bragg Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army, a principal commander in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...












==Initial movements in the Chickamauga Campaign==


In his successful Tullahoma Campaign in the summer of 1863, Rosecrans moved southeast from Murfreesboro, Tennessee, driving Bragg across the state of Tennessee to the city of Chattanooga, suffering only 560 casualties along the way. Chattanooga was a vital city for war aims because seizing it would open the door for an assault on Atlanta and the heartland of the South. General-in-chief Henry W. Halleck was insistent that Rosecrans move quickly to seize Chattanooga. President Abraham Lincoln declared that "whoever controls Chattanooga will win the war." Chattanooga was also vital to the Confederate States of America. The location between Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Raccoon Mountain, and Stringer's Ridge was strategically important. In addition, Chattanooga was a rail hub (lines going northward toward Nashville and Knoxville and southward toward Atlanta), a center of banking and commerce, and a manufacturing center (iron and coke) located on the navigable Tennessee River. Battle of Hoovers Gap Conflict American Civil War Date June 24– 26, 1862 Place Bedford County, Tennessee and Rutherford County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Hoovers Gap was the principal battle fought in the Tullahoma Campaign of the American Civil War. ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ... Nickname: Location in Fulton and DeKalb counties in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ... This article is 88 kilobytes or more in size. ... Henry Wager Halleck (1815 - 1872) was an American soldier and politician. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... View from the top of Lookout Mountain, February, 1864, by George N Barnard Lookout Mountain, actually a plateau, is located at the northwest corner of Georgia, the northeast corner of Alabama, and along the southern border of Tennessee near Chattanooga. ... Missionary Ridge is a geographic feature in Chattanooga, Tennessee, site of the Battle of Missionary Ridge, a battle in the American Civil War, fought on November 25, 1863. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: , Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... Nickname: Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee. ...


Rosecrans delayed for weeks but finally renewed the offensive on August 16, aiming to force the Confederates out of Chattanooga by threatening their supply lines to the south. A major obstacle on his route was the Tennessee River, and Rosecrans devised diversionary activities to prevent Bragg from opposing his crossing at Caperton's Ferry. The Second Battle of Chattanooga was part of the diversion. Colonel John T. Wilder of the XIV Corps moved a brigade near Chattanooga and bombarded the city with artillery for two weeks, fooling Bragg as to the direction of the Union advance. Rosecrans crossed the Tennessee without opposition. The terrain he faced in northwestern Georgia was formidable, consisting of the long chain of rugged mountains known as Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, which had very poor road networks. is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Battle of Chattanooga II was a battle in the American Civil War, beginning on August 21, 1863, as the opening battle in the Chickamauga Campaign. ... John Thomas Wilder (January 31, 1830 – October 20, 1917) was an officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War and an industrialist who was instrumental in developing the natural resources of the State of Tennessee. ... XIV Corps was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ...


Bragg and the Confederate high command were nervous about this development and took steps to reinforce Bragg. General Joseph E. Johnston's army dispatched a division from Mississippi under Maj. Gen. Hiram T. Walker by September 4, and General Robert E. Lee dispatched a corps under Lt. Gen. James Longstreet from Virginia. Joseph E. Johnston Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer and one of the most senior generals in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // This article is about the Confederate general. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... James Longstreet (January 8, 1821 – January 2, 1904) was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War, the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his Old War Horse. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Three corps of Rosecrans's army split and advanced by separate routes, on the only three roads that were suitable for such movements. On the right flank, the XX Corps under Maj. Gen. Alexander M. McCook moved southwest to Valley Head, Alabama; in the center, the XIV Corps under Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas moved just across the border to Trenton, Georgia; and on the left, the XXI Corps under Maj. Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden moved directly toward Chattanooga around Lookout Mountain. On September 8, after learning that Rosecrans had crossed into his rear, Bragg evacuated Chattanooga and moved his army south along the LaFayette Road toward LaFayette, Georgia. He was aware of Rosecrans's dispositions and planned to defeat him by attacking his isolated corps individually. The corps were spread out over 40 miles (65 km), too far apart to support each other. Two corps of the Union Army were called XX Corps during the American Civil War. ... Alexander McDowell McCook Alexander McDowell McCook (April 22, 1831 – June 12, 1903) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. ... Valley Head is a town located in DeKalb County, Alabama. ... XIV Corps was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... General George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816 - March 28, 1870), Northern general during the American Civil War, was born in Southampton County, Virginia. ... Trenton is a city located in Dade County, Georgia. ... XXI Corps was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Thomas L. Crittenden Thomas Leonidas Crittenden (May 15, 1819 – October 23, 1893) was a lawyer, politician, and Union general during the American Civil War. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... LaFayette is a city located in Walker County, Georgia, USA. As of the 2000 Census, the city had a total population of 6,702. ...


Rosecrans was convinced that Bragg was demoralized and fleeing to either Dalton, Rome, or Atlanta, Georgia. Instead, Bragg's Army of Tennessee was encamped at La Fayette, some 20 miles (32 km) south of Chattanooga. Confederate soldiers who posed as deserters deliberately added to this impression. Rosecrans ordered McCook to swing across Lookout Mountain at Winston's Gap and use his cavalry to break Bragg's railroad supply line at Resaca, Georgia. Crittenden was to take Chattanooga and then turn south in pursuit of Bragg. Thomas was to continue his advance toward La Fayette. On September 10, Thomas's advance division, under Maj. Gen. James Negley, encountered a Confederate division under Maj. Gen. Thomas C. Hindman, and a skirmish occurred at Dug Gap in Pigeon Mountain. The minor engagement became known as the Battle of Davis' Cross Roads. After the encounter, Negley's Federals withdrew back to Stevens's Gap in Lookout Mountain. Dalton is a city in Whitfield County, Georgia, United States. ... Aerial view of downtown Rome Location of Rome and major highways Nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, Rome is the largest city in and the county seat of Floyd County, Georgia, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Fulton and DeKalb counties in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ... Resaca is a city located in Gordon County, Georgia. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Scott Negley (1896-1901) was a U.S. soldier, farmer and U.S. Congressman. ... Thomas Carmichael Hindman (28 January 1828 - 27 September 1868) was a United States Representative from the 1st Congressional District of Arkansas and a Major General in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Davis Cross Roads, also known as the Battle of Dug Gap, was fought on September 10–11, 1863, in northwestern Georgia, as part of the Chickamauga Campaign of the American Civil War. ...


Bragg decided to attack Crittenden and ordered Maj. Gen. Leonidas Polk to attack Crittenden's lead division, under Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Wood, early on September 13, with Polk's corps and Walker's corps, assuming that Crittenden's divisions were separated. However, Polk realized that Crittenden had in fact concentrated his divisions and elected not to attack, infuriating Bragg. For the second time in three days, Bragg had been unable to get his subordinates to attack in a timely fashion, and now Rosecrans was belatedly concentrating his forces. For the agrarian leader and North Carolinas first Commissioner of Agriculture, see Leonidas Lafayette Polk. ... Thomas J. Wood was a Union General during the American Civil War. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


By September 17, the three Union corps had closed up and were much less vulnerable to individual defeat. Yet Bragg decided that he still had an opportunity. Reinforced with troops arriving from Virginia under Maj. Gen. James Longstreet, and troops from Mississippi under Brig. Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson, he decided on the morning of September 18 to advance on Crittenden's left and cut the three union Corps from their supply base at Chattanooga. is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Longstreet (January 8, 1821 – January 2, 1904) was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War, the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his Old War Horse. ... Bushrod Johnson Bushrod Rust Johnson (October 7, 1817 – September 12, 1880) was a teacher, university chancellor, and Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Battle of Chickamauga

Battle of Chickamauga: September 18 attacks      Confederate      Union
Battle of Chickamauga: September 18 attacks      Confederate      Union

As Bragg marched north along the LaFayette Road to engage Crittenden's XXI Corps on September 18, his cavalry and infantry fought with Union cavalry and Union mounted infantry under the command of Col. Robert Minty and Col. John T. Wilder (whose command was armed with Spencer repeating rifles). The forces under Hood, Walker, and Simon B. Buckner crossed West Chickamauga Creek against this pressure and bivouacked just to the west of the creek; Crittenden's corps was one mile (1.6 km) to the west of their position. Although Bragg had achieved some degree of surprise, he failed to strongly exploit it. Rosecrans, observing the dust raised by the marching Confederates in the morning, anticipated Bragg's plan. He ordered Thomas and McCook to Crittenden's support, and while the Confederates were crossing the creek, Thomas began to arrive in Crittenden's rear area. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The LaFayette Road is found in Northwest Georgia in the counties of Walker and Catoosa. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Spencer repeating rifle was a manually operated lever-action, repeating rifle fed from a tube magazine with cartridges. ... Simon Bolivar Buckner Simon Bolivar Buckner (April 1, 1823 – January 8, 1914) was a career U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War, the officer who yielded to Ulysses S. Grants famous demand for unconditional surrender at the Battle of...

Battle of Chickamauga: September 19 attacks
Battle of Chickamauga: September 19 attacks

On the morning of September 19, Thomas's four divisions were spread out north of Crittenden's position. Bragg, however, was unaware of the arrival of Thomas and believed that Crittenden occupied the left flank of the Union position. The Union commanders were equally unaware of the Confederate dispositions and did not know that they had crossed the creek the night before. Early that morning, the Confederate corps under Buckner and Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Cheatham's division joined Hood and Walker. The fighting that morning started with an attack by Thomas, who believed he was attacking only a small force under cavalry commander Brig. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest to his front. The fight expanded and lasted throughout the day as Bragg and Rosecrans engaged more of their armies. The fighting would seesaw back and forth with first one side attacking and then in turn being attacked, but as the day wore on the Confederates' numerical advantage began to be felt and the Union forces began to be slowly driven back toward the LaFayette Road. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Benjamin F. Cheatham Benjamin Franklin Cheatham (October 20, 1820 – September 4, 1886), known also as Frank, was a Tennessee farmer, California gold miner, and a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... For the World War II general, see Nathan Bedford Forrest III. Nathaniel Bedford Forrest (July 13, 1821–October 29, 1877) was a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. ...


That night, as Rosecrans rearranged his divisions to form a more compact defensive line, Bragg made plans to resume his offensive on September 20 by once again attempting to envelop the Union left flank. He reorganized his army into two wings, commanded by Polk and Longstreet (who had just arrived from Virginia), based on locations of units at the time, without regard for the existing command structures. Bragg seemed to have been unaware of the severity of the fighting that day, because when Longstreet arrived that night, Bragg told him that "the troops have been engaged in ... severe skirmishing while endeavoring to get in line of battle." is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Battle of Chickamauga: September 20 attacks
Battle of Chickamauga: September 20 attacks

On September 20, Confederate Maj. Gen. D.H. Hill was supposed to assault the Union right flank at 7:30 a.m. However, he delayed two hours, later claiming he had not received orders, but more likely pouting over being passed over for wing command. General Thomas's men would use the quiet morning hours to construct crude breastworks along their line around Kelly field. Shortly after Hill's attack commenced, one of his divisions under Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge attacked Thomas's left flank and was able to flank it and gain Thomas's rear temporarily. By 10:15 a.m., part of Maj. Gen. James S. Negley's division, which had been held in reserve, had pushed north and repulsed the assault. The next Confederate attack was by Maj. Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne, but he was stopped by fire from the breastworks at Kelly Field. Bragg was concerned about the failure of his attacks on the Union left and ordered a general assault along the entire line, changing his strategy from a flanking attack to a full frontal assault. At 11 a.m., assaults by Maj. Gen. Alexander P. Stewart and Walker were repulsed. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... General Daniel Harvey Hill Daniel Harvey Hill (July 12, 1821 – September 24, 1889) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War and a Southern scholar. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... James Scott Negley (1896_1901) was a U.S. soldier, farmer and U.S. Congressman. ... Patrick Cleburne Patrick Ronayne Cleburne (March 16 or March 17, 1828[1] – November 30, 1864) was a major general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War, killed at the Battle of Franklin. ... “Flanking” redirects here. ... Alexander Peter Stewart (October 2, 1821 – August 30, 1908) was a U.S. Army officer, college professor, general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War, and the Chancellor of the University of Mississippi. ...


Thomas requested reinforcements, and Rosecrans began shifting units to react to the initial attacks on his flank. At about 11 a.m., General T.J. Wood was ordered to replace Brig. Gen. John Milton Brannan's division, which had been ordered to Thomas's aid. Brannan had not followed the order, however, after being attacked by Stewart's men; the order was poorly written and told Wood to close up and support Reynolds. Although he could not close up on him, he could move his men to a supporting position, which created a real gap that corps commander Alexander McCook was trying to fill when Longstreet's entire wing of the army attacked. They were able to exploit this gap and struck the columns of Union soldiers in their flanks as they moved. Longstreet had, however inadvertently, achieved another successful surprise assault, for which he had a well-deserved reputation in the war. John Milton Brannan (July 1, 1819 – December 16, 1892) was an American soldier who served in the Mexican-American War and as a Union general in the American Civil War. ...


The Union troops in the gap began to retreat, carrying Rosecrans along with them, and McCook's and Crittenden's commands soon followed. By 1 p.m., Thomas was the sole commander left on the battlefield. He received word from Rosecrans to withdraw the troops to Rossville, Georgia, a few miles to the north in the direction of Chattanooga. But Thomas was too heavily engaged to move. He began consolidating forces on Horseshoe Ridge and Snodgrass Hill. The Union Reserve Corps commander, Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, who was north of the battlefield at MacAfee's Church, heard the firing to the south and, on his own initiative, sent Brig. Gen. James B. Steedman to support Thomas. Steedman arrived about 2:30 p.m., just in time to stop Longstreet's attempt to envelop Thomas's right flank. At about 4 p.m., Longstreet made one final effort but could not break the stubborn Union defense. At the same time, Thomas repulsed a renewed assault by Cheatham on his left flank. Gordon Granger (November 6, 1822 – January 10, 1876) was a Union Major General during American Civil War. ...


Aftermath

Monument to the Florida soldiers who fought in the battle.
Monument to the Florida soldiers who fought in the battle.

Thomas withdrew to Rossville that night. His heroic defense that day earned him the nickname The Rock of Chickamauga. It is recognized that although his troops fought valiantly, it was his personal determination that saved the Union army from disaster. Bragg failed to pursue the Union forces, due to the horrible losses he had suffered and also for want of logistical support. Monument to the Florida soldiers who fought at the Battle of Chickamauga. ... Monument to the Florida soldiers who fought at the Battle of Chickamauga. ...


On September 21, Rosecrans's army withdrew to the city of Chattanooga while the Confederates occupied the surrounding heights and laid siege upon the Union forces. Unable to break the siege, Rosecrans was relieved of his command of the Army of the Cumberland on October 19. It took the relief forces of Maj. Gens. Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman and the Battle of Chattanooga that November to break Bragg's grip on the city. is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Union army in the west during the American Civil War, commanded at various times by Generals Robert Anderson, Don Carlos Buell, William S. Rosecrans, and George Thomas. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ulysses S. Grant[2] (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. ... The third Battle of Chattanooga (popularly known as The Battle of Chattanooga) was fought November 23–25, 1863, in the American Civil War. ...


Considered a Confederate victory for halting the Union advance, the Battle of Chickamauga was a costly one. It claimed an estimated 34,624 casualties (16,170 for the Union; 18,454 for the Confederates).


See also

The following Confederate States Army units and commanders fought in the Battle of Chickamauga of the American Civil War. ... The following Union Army units and commanders fought in the Battle of Chickamauga of the American Civil War. ...

References

Notes

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Chickamauga Campaign Official Records and Battle Description (127 words)
A brief, fairly detailed, description of the battle itself, with map of the 2nd day action.
Another good battle description with a Union slant.
Article taken from Battles and Leaders of The Civil War.
Chickamauga - Civil War (925 words)
The scene of the battle was one where neither Bragg nor William Rosecrans wanted to fight.
At the start of battle the Union troops were moving north along the east side(right side) of the center map.
The brunt of the fighting on September 19, the first day of battle, was borne by Union General George Thomas and Confederate General Leonidas Polk.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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