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Encyclopedia > Battle of Changsha (1944)
Battle of Changsha (1944)
Part of the Second Sino-Japanese War
Date May 1944 - August 1944
Location Changsha
Result Chinese victory
Combatants
National Revolutionary Army Imperial Japanese Army
Commanders
Xue Yue
Second Sino-Japanese War
Major engagements in bold
Mukden - Invasion of Manchuria (Jiangqiao - Nenjiang Bridge - Chinchow - Harbin) - Shanghai (1932) - Great Wall - Rehe - Suiyuan - Marco Polo Bridge - Beiping-Tianjin - Chahar - Shanghai (1937) (Sihang Warehouse) - Beiping-Hankou Railway - Tianjin-Pukou Railway - Taiyuan - (Pingxingguan) - Xinkou - Nanjing - Xuzhou- Taierzhuang - N.-E.Henan - (Lanfeng) - (Amoy) - Wuhan - Canton - (Hainan) - (Xiushui River) - Nanchang - Suixian-Zaoyang - (Swatow) - 1st Changsha - S.Guangxi- (Kunlun Pass) - Winter Offensive -(Wuyuan) -S.Henan - Zaoyang-Yichang - Hundred Regiments - Indochina Expedition - Shanggao - S.Shanxi - 2nd Changsha - 3rd Changsha - Yunnan-Burma Road-(Yenangyaung)- Zhejiang-Jiangxi - W.Hubei - N.Burma-W.Yunnan - Changde - C.Henan - 4th Changsha - Guilin-Liuzhou - W.Henan-N.Hubei - W.Hunan- 2nd Guangxi
edit

The Battle of Changsha (1944), also known as the Battle of Hengyang or Battle of Hengyang-Changsha, was an invasion of the Chinese province of Hunan by Japanese troops near the end of the Second Sino-Japanese War. As such, it encompasses three separate conflicts: an invasion of the city of Changsha and two invasions of Hengyang. Combatants Republic of China Empire of Japan Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Tse-Tung, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Zhu De, He Yingqin Hideki Tojo, Matsui Iwane, Jiro Minami, Kesago Nakajima, Toshizo Nishio, Yasuji Okamura. ... Look up May in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... August is the eighth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... Mao Zedong Museum in Changsha Changsha (Simplified Chinese: é•¿æ²™; Traditional Chinese: é•·æ²™; Pinyin: Chángshā; Wade-Giles: Chang-sha) is the capital of Hunan, a province of Southcentral China, located on the lower reaches of Xiangjiang river, a branch of the Yangtze River. ... The National Revolutionary Army (NRA) (Chinese: 國民革命軍; pinyin: guo2 min2 ge2 ming4 jun1) was the national army of the Republic of China. ... The Imperial Japanese Army (: 大日本帝國陸軍 Shinjitai: 大日本帝国陸軍 Dai-Nippon Teikoku Rikugun) was the official ground based armed force of Japan from 1867 to 1945 when it was Imperial Japan. ... Xue Yue (Chinese: 薛岳; pinyin: XuÄ“ Yuè) (December 26, 1896 - December 26, 1998) was one of Nationalist Chinas best generals. ... Combatants Republic of China Empire of Japan Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Tse-Tung, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Zhu De, He Yingqin Hideki Tojo, Matsui Iwane, Jiro Minami, Kesago Nakajima, Toshizo Nishio, Yasuji Okamura. ... Battle of Changsha (September 17, 1939 _ October 6, 1939) was the first attempt by Japan to take the city of China, during the second Sino-Japanese War. ... The Battle of Changsha (September 6, 1941 _ October 8, 1941) was Japans second attempt in taking the city of China, as part of the second Sino-Japanese War. ... Combatants Republic of China Empire of Japan Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Tse-Tung, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Zhu De, He Yingqin Hideki Tojo, Matsui Iwane, Jiro Minami, Kesago Nakajima, Toshizo Nishio, Yasuji Okamura. ... It has been suggested that Manchuria Incident be merged into this article or section. ... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, China Imperial Japanese Army, Japan Commanders Zhang Xueliang, Ma Zhanshan, Feng Zhanhai, Ting Chao Shigeru Honjo, Jiro Tamon Strength 160,000 30,000 - 84,000 Casualties  ?  ? ... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, China Imperial Japanese Army, Japan Commanders Gen. ... Resistance at Nenjiang Bridge was a small war fought between small forces of Chinese militias against the Japanese Imperial Army and collaborationist forces, after the Mukden Incident in which Manchuria was lost to Japan. ... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, Anti-Japanese Volunteer Armies, Republic of China Imperial Japanese Army, Empire of Japan Commanders Marshal Zhang Xueliang Lt. ... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, China Imperial Japanese Army, Japan Commanders Feng Zhanhai, Ting Chao Shigeru Honjo Strength 30,000  ? Casualties  ?  ? After General Ma Zhanshan had been driven from Tsitsihar by the Japanese in the Jiangqiao Campaign he had retreated northeastward with his beaten and depleted forces and had set up... Combatants Republic of China, 19th Route Army, 5th Army Empire of Japan, Imperial Japanese Army, 2nd Independent Tank Company, Shanghai Expeditionary Force Commanders 19th Route Army: Jiang Guangnai (Chinese: 蔣光鼐), 5th Army: Zhang Zhizhong (Chinese: 張治中) Commander: Yoshinori Shirakawa (Japanese: 白川義則), Chief of staff: Kanichiro Tashiro (Japanese: 田代皖一郎) Strength 50,000 90,000 Casualties... The Defense of the Great Wall (Traditional Chinese: 長城抗戰; Simplified Chinese: 长城抗战; pinyin: Chángchéng Kàngzhàn) (January 1 - May 31, 1933) was a battle between the armies of Republic of China and Empire of Japan, before official hostilities of the Sino-Japanese War commenced in 1937. ... The Battle of Rehe was fought from February 21 to March 1 of 1933 between China and Japan. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Marco Polo Bridge Incident (盧溝橋事變; also known as 七七事變, 七七盧溝橋事變) was a battle between Japans Imperial Army and Chinas National Revolutionary Army, marking the beginning of the Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945). ... The Battle of Beiping-Tianjin (Traditional Chinese: 平津作戰; Simplified Chinese: 平津作战; pinyin: ) (25 July - 31 July 1937) was a battle fought during the Second Sino-Japanese War in the proximity of Beiping (now Beijing) and Tianjin. ... When the China Incident happened, the 1st Independent Mixed Brigade stationed in Manchuria moved to Hebei and fought near Beijing. ... Combatants Republic of China Empire of Japan Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Chen Cheng, Chu Shao-liang, Chang Fa-kuei Heisuke Yanagawa, Iwane Matsui Strength 600,000 troops in 75 divisions and 9 brigades, 250 airplanes 300,000 troops in 8 divisions and 6 brigades, 3000 airplanes, 300 tanks, 130 warships... 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Combatants China, National Revolutionary Army Japan, Central China Theater Army Commanders Tang Shengzhi Matsui Iwane Strength 100,000 men 8 divisions Casualties ~50,000 military personnel, ~300,000 civilians minimal The Battle of Nanjing (Traditional Chinese: 南京保衛戰; Simplified Chinese: 南京保卫战; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Nan-ching Pao-wei Chan) began after the... The Battle of Xuzhou was fought between Japanese and Chinese forces in May of 1938 during World War Two. ... The Battle of Taierzhuang was a battle of the Second Sino_Japanese War in 1938, between armies of Chinese Kuomintang and Japan. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants National Revolutionary Army Military Region 5, 9, Soviet Air Force volunteers[1] Imperial Japanese Army, Central China Expeditionary Force, 11th Army, 2nd Army, China Area Fleet, Central China Aviation Army Corps Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Xue Yue, Wu Qiwei, Zhang Fakui, Wang Jingjiu, Ou Zhentong, Yu Jishi,Duan Langru... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants Imperial Japanese Navy, Japan National Revolutionary Army, China Commanders Vice Adm. ... During the Second Sino-Japanese War, Japanese artillery forces marched a long distance into the vast area of continental China. ... For the Chinese Civil War battle in 1927, see Nanchang Uprising. ... The Battle of Suixian-Zaoyang (Traditional Chinese: 隨棗會戰; Simplified Chinese: 随枣会战; pinyin: ), also known as the Battle of Suizao was one of the 22 major engagements between the National Revolutionary Army and Imperial Japanese Army during the Second Sino-Japanese War. ... Combatants Imperial Japanese Army, Japan National Revolutionary Army, China Commanders Major Gen. ... Battle of Changsha (September 17, 1939 _ October 6, 1939) was the first attempt by Japan to take the city of China, during the second Sino-Japanese War. ... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, China Imperial Japanese Army, Japan Commanders Strength 120,000 troops in 12 armies 70,000 troops in 4 divisions Casualties The Battle of South Guangxi (Traditional: 桂南會戰; Simplified: 桂南会战; Hanyu Pinyin: ), was one of the 22 major engagements between the National Revolutionary Army and Imperial Japanese Army during... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, China Imperial Japanese Army, Japan Commanders Du Yuming Masao Nakamura Strength  ?  ? Casualties 27,000 men 8000 men The Battle of Kunlun Pass (Traditional Chinese: 崑崙關戰役, Simplified Chinese: 昆仑关战役; pinyin: KÅ«nlúnguān Zhàngyì) was series of battles between the Japanese and the Chinese in contention for... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants Imperial Japanese Army, Japan National Revolutionary Army, China Commanders Shigenori Kuroda Fu Zuoyi Strength 5 - 10,000 28,000 Casualties  ?  ? The Battle of Wuyuan (March 16 - April 3, 1940) was a counterattack that defeated the Japanese invasion of the Wuyuan area. ... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, China Imperial Japanese Army, Japan Commanders Li Zongren Strength 3 armies 3 divisions Casualties 9,000 troops The Battle of South Henan (Traditional: 豫南會戰; Simplified: 豫南会战; Hanyu Pinyin: ), was one of the 22 major engagements between the National Revolutionary Army and Imperial Japanese Army during the Second Sino... 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Strength 180,000 troops in 8 armies 100,000 troops in 6 divisions, 3 brigades Casualties  ? more than 20,000 troops The Battle of South Shanxi (Traditional: 晉南會戰; Simplified: 晋南会战; Hanyu Pinyin: ), also known as the Battle of Jinnan was... The Battle of Changsha (September 6, 1941 _ October 8, 1941) was Japans second attempt in taking the city of China, as part of the second Sino-Japanese War. ... The Battle of Changsha (December 24, 1941 _ January 15, 1942) was the third attempt by Japan to take the city of China during the China following their attack on Pearl Harbor. ... Combatants Japan, Imperial Japanese Army United Kingdom, China, National Revolutionary Army Commanders Lo Cho-ying, Joseph Stilwell Shojiro Iida Strength  ?  ? Casualties  ?  ? Battle of Yunnan-Burma Road (Mid March - Early June 1942) was the name of the Chinese intervention to aid their British allies in the 1942 Burma Campaign. ... The Battle of Yenangyaung was fought in Burma, now Myanmar during World War II. The Battle The battle for the Yenangyaung oil fields started on 11th April and continued for a week and one of the most desperate actions was against 48th Indian Brigade at Kokkogwa. ... The Battle of Zhejiang-Jiangxi refers to a campaign by the Japanese Imperial Army and allied Chinese forces in the Chinese provinces of Zhejiang and Jiangxi in 1942. ... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, China Imperial Japanese Army, Japan Commanders Bai Chongxi Strength 14 armies 7 divisions Casualties ~60,000 25,830 troops The Battle of West Hubei (Traditional: 鄂西會戰; Simplified: 鄂西会战; Hanyu Pinyin: ), was one of the 22 major engagements between the National Revolutionary Army and Imperial Japanese Army during the... Combatants United Kingdom, China, National Revolutionary Army Japan, Imperial Japanese Army Commanders Wei Li-huang, Joseph Stilwell, Daniel Isom Sultan Masakazu Kawabe, Heitaro Kimura Strength  ?  ? Casualties  ?  ? Battle of Northern Burma and Western Yunnan (Oct. ... The Battle of Changde (Traditional Chinese: 常德會戰; Simplified Chinese: 常德会战; pinyin: ) was a major engagement in the Second Sino-Japanese War. ... The Battle of Henan-Hunan-Guangxi (Traditional Chinese: 豫湘桂會戰; Simplified Chinese: 豫湘桂会战; pinyin: ) also known as Operation Ichigo or Tairiku Datsu Sakusen (Japanese:一号作戦 or 大陸打通作戦) was a series of major battles between the Imperial Japanese Army forces and the Republic of China Army, fought from April to December 1944. ... The Battle of Guilin-Liuzhou (Traditional Chinese: 桂柳會戰; Simplified Chinese: 桂柳会战; pinyin: ), also known as the Battle of Guiliu was one of the 22 major engagements between the National Revolutionary Army and Imperial Japanese Army during the Second Sino-Japanese War. ... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, China Imperial Japanese Army, Japan Commanders Strength 17 armies 5 divisions, 3 brigades Casualties  ? 15,000 troops The Battle of West Henan-North Hubei (Traditional: 豫西鄂北會戰; Simplified: 豫西鄂北会战; Hanyu Pinyin: ), was one of the 22 major engagements between the National Revolutionary Army and Imperial Japanese Army during the... Combatants China, National Revolutionary Army Japan, Imperial Japanese Army Commanders He Yingqin 板西一良 (??) Strength 2 army groups, several companies, NRA Air Force, USAAF 70-80,000 troops in 7 divisions Casualties Unknown ~20,000 The Battle of West Hunan was the last of the 22 major engagements involving 100,000 troops... Combatants China, National Revolutionary Army Japan, Imperial Japanese Army Commanders Chang Fu-kuei, Tang Enbai Yukio Kasahara Strength  ?  ? Casualties  ?  ? The Second Guangxi Campaign (Late April-July, 1945) was a Chinese counteroffensive against the Japanese forces that had taken Guangxi during Operation Ichigo and aimed at the recovery of all Guangxi... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: Húnán) is a province of China, located in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River and south of Lake Dongting (hence the name Hunan, meaning south of the lake). Hunan is sometimes called 湘 (pinyin: Xiāng) for short, after the Xiang River which runs through the... Combatants Republic of China Empire of Japan Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Tse-Tung, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Zhu De, He Yingqin Hideki Tojo, Matsui Iwane, Jiro Minami, Kesago Nakajima, Toshizo Nishio, Yasuji Okamura. ... Mao Zedong Museum in Changsha Changsha (Simplified Chinese: é•¿æ²™; Traditional Chinese: é•·æ²™; Pinyin: Chángshā; Wade-Giles: Chang-sha) is the capital of Hunan, a province of Southcentral China, located on the lower reaches of Xiangjiang river, a branch of the Yangtze River. ... The four major cities of Hunan Province, including Hengyang Hengyang (Simplified Chinese: 衡阳; Traditional Chinese: 衡陽; pinyin: ) is the second largest city of Chinas Hunan Province. ...


The Japanese military transferred the bulk of their troops from within the country and the northeast as part of Operation "Ichi-Go" or "Tairiku Datsu Sakusen" which roughly translates as ‘Operaton to Break through the Continent’. This was an attempt to establish a land and rail corridor from between the Japanese occupied territories of North East China and Korea and those in South East Asia. In June 1944 the Japanese deployed 360,000 troops (not including air or sea support) to invade Changsha for the fourth time (the first being in 1939). The Operation involved more Japanese troops than any other campaign in the Sino-Japanese war. The military history of Japan is characterized by a long period of feudal wars, followed by domestic stability, and then foreign conquest. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... Mao Zedong Museum in Changsha Changsha (Simplified Chinese: 长沙; Traditional Chinese: 長沙; Pinyin: Chángshā; Wade-Giles: Chang-sha) is the capital of Hunan, a province of Southcentral China, located on the lower reaches of Xiangjiang river, a branch of the Yangtze River. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The Japanese modified the tactics they had used in their previous three attempts and chose to rapidly ransack the city of Changsha, breaking the defenses of the infantry within the city, as well as neutralizing the Chinese artillery on Yuelu Mountain. The Chinese were unable to stop the assault, and lost control of Changsha. Two Japanese military detachments moved on to besiege Hengyang, but the Chinese National Revolutionary Army's Tenth Division repelled their advance twice. The Mount Yuelu (S.Chinese:岳麓山, T.Chinese:嶽麓山, pinyin: yuè lǔ shān) is located on the west bank of Xiang River in Changsha of Hunan, China. ...


The unresolved situation in Hengyang helped hasten the crumbling of the Tojo Hideki's cabinet. Hideki Tojo Hideki Tojo (東條 英機 Tōjō Hideki) (December 30, 1884–December 23, 1948) was a Japanese general and the 27th Prime Minister of Japan during much of World War II, from October 18, 1941 to July 22, 1944. ...


In August 1944, Japanese troops led by three generals again attacked Hengyang with the help of air support. Chinese troops resisted fiercely aided by local knowledge, and constructing effective barricades up to 4m high. The Chinese defences were intelligently constructed and used crossfire zones to maximize firepower. This caused the Japanese 11th Division to lose morale and it began preparations for retreat. Morale rose, however, when the Japanese 58th Division broke into the city, and the 11th Division resumed their attack. Reinforcements sent by the Chinese National Revolutionary Army attempted many times to reach Hengyang, but were blocked.


After 47 days of bitter fighting, the Japanese troops managed to invade Hengyang, but paid a heavy price in casualties: many lives were lost, including 390 officers dead and another 520 wounded. Thus, the Chinese troops to the north were able to expand their influence despite the loss of the city.


After the battle, the Japanese could not continue to fight. During this period Japan discovered that government privileges from Wang Jingwei's puppet regime were useless, and consequently they rejected plans to take more Chinese territory. At the same time their negotiating position with China became significantly less powerful -- to the point where they agreed to set aside the "Tang Ju" treaty. Wang Jingwei * Courtesy name: Jixin (季新) * Alternate name: Zhaoming (兆銘). Wang Jingwei (Traditional Chinese: 汪精衛; Simplified Chinese: 汪精卫; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Wang Ching-wei) (May 4, 1883 – November 10, 1944), was a Chinese politician. ...


The Chinese government continued to pressure the Japanese to completely withdraw from the northeast. The Japanese, in a desperate measure, collected as many troops as possible in April 1945 to invade Xiangxi's heavy settlement Zhijiang, hoping to open a path to Sichuan. The troops were intercepted in an ambush by the Chinese National Guard and were almost completely wiped out, and China regained some of its territory. By this point, the course of the war had turned. Later, the Japanese surrendered at the Zijiang River. Zhijiang can refer to: Zhijiang Dong Autonomous County of Hunan Zhijiang, Hubei, a county-level city in Hubei This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... (Chinese: 四川; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ssu-ch`uan; Postal Pinyin: Szechwan and Szechuan) is a province in central-western China with its capital at Chengdu. ... The Zi Jiang (also Zishui River or Zi River; S.Chinese: 资江 or 资水; T.Chinese: 資江 or 資水; pinyin: zī jiāng; Wade-Giles: Tzu¹-chiang¹) is one of the four largest rivers in Hunan province of China, also one of the main...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle of Changsha (1944) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (608 words)
The Battle of Changsha (1944), also known as the Battle of Hengyang or Battle of Hengyang-Changsha, was an invasion of the Chinese province of Hunan by Japanese troops near the end of the Second Sino-Japanese War.
In June 1944 the Japanese deployed 360,000 troops (not including air or sea support) to invade Changsha for the fourth time (the first being in 1939).
The Japanese modified the tactics they had used in their previous three attempts and chose to rapidly ransack the city of Changsha, breaking the defenses of the infantry within the city, as well as neutralizing the Chinese artillery on Yuelu Mountain.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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