FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Battle of Bunker Hill
Battle of Bunker Hill
Part of the American Revolutionary War

The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunker Hill by John Trumbull
Date June 17, 1775
Location 42°22′37.6″N 71°3′33″W / 42.377111, -71.05917 (Battle of Bunker Hill)Coordinates: 42°22′37.6″N 71°3′33″W / 42.377111, -71.05917 (Battle of Bunker Hill)
Charlestown, Massachusetts
Result British victory
Territorial
changes
British capture Charlestown peninsula
Belligerents
Flag of the United Kingdom
Kingdom of Great Britain

British Colonial militia
Commanders
British Army:
William Howe
Robert Pigot
Henry Clinton
Royal Navy:
Samuel Graves
Israel Putnam
William Prescott
Joseph Warren 
Seth Pomeroy
John Stark
(Both Warren and Pomeroy declined command)
Strength
2,400 1,500
Casualties and losses
19 officers killed
226 soldiers killed,
10 officers wounded
818 soldiers wounded
Total: 1,073
140 dead,
271 wounded,
30 captured (20 POWs Died)
Total: 441

The Battle of Bunker Hill took place on June 17, 1775 on Breed's Hill, as part of the Siege of Boston during the American Revolutionary War. General Israel Putnam was in charge of the revolutionary forces, while Major-General William Howe commanded the British forces. Because most of the fighting did not occur on Bunker Hill itself, the conflict is sometimes more accurately (though less often) called the Battle of Breed's Hill. Bunker Hill is the name of: A hill in Charlestown, Massachusetts Battle of Bunker Hill, a battle American Revolutionary War fought near (not on) the hill in Charlestown, Massachusetts Several American woman named after the Battle of Bunker Hill, including: USS Bunker Hill (CV-17), an Essex Class aircraft carrier... This article is about military actions only. ... Image File history File links The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunkers Hill. ... This article is about the American painter. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... Image File history File links New_England_blank_flag. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe, KB, PC (10 August 1729 – 12 July 1814) was a British General who was Commander-in-Chief of British forces during the American Revolutionary War, one of the three Howe brothers. ... Sir Robert Pigot, Baronet (1720 – August 1, 1796) was a British Army officer during the American Revolutionary War. ... General Sir Henry Clinton K.B. Commander-in-Chief of British troops in America. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Samuel Graves (*1713 †1787) was a British Admiral who fought for the British in the American Revolution. ... Maj. ... The Super Sexy and hot Statue of Colonel William Prescott in Charlestown, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the American doctor, soldier and statesman during the American Revolutionary War. ... Temporary grave of an American machine-gunner during the Battle of Normandy. ... Seth Pomeroy (May 20, 1706 – February 9, 1777) was an American gunsmith and soldier from Northampton, Massachusetts. ... For other persons named John Stark, see John Stark (disambiguation). ... Belligerents Colonial militia Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders Israel Putnam, et al. ... Powder House on the seal of the City of Somerville. ... Combatants Militia of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, (Minutemen) British Army, British Marines, Royal Artillery Commanders John Parker, James Barrett, John Buttrick, William Heath, Joseph Warren Francis Smith, John Pitcairn, Walter Laurie, Hugh, Earl Percy Strength 75 at Lexington Common (Parker). ... Combatants New England militia, Continental Army Great Britain Commanders Artemas Ward, George Washington Thomas Gage, William Howe Strength 17,000 The Siege of Boston (April 19, 1775 – March 17, 1776) was the opening phase of the American Revolutionary War, in which New England militiamen—and then the Continental Army—surrounded... Combatants Kingdom of Great Britain Province of Massachusetts Bay Commanders Samuel Graves Thomas Graves John Stark Israel Putnam Strength Several hundred Royal Marines (Samuel Graves). ... Combatants Continental Army Great Britain Commanders George Washington William Howe The Fortification of Dorchester Heights was a decisive action early in the American Revolutionary War, which led to the British evacuation of Boston, ending the ongoing siege of Boston. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Breeds Hill is the actual site where the Battle of Bunker Hill took place during the American Revolution, located in the Charlestown section of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Combatants New England militia, Continental Army Great Britain Commanders Artemas Ward, George Washington Thomas Gage, William Howe Strength 17,000 The Siege of Boston (April 19, 1775 – March 17, 1776) was the opening phase of the American Revolutionary War, in which New England militiamen—and then the Continental Army—surrounded... This article is about military actions only. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Maj. ... Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ... William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe, KB, PC (10 August 1729 – 12 July 1814) was a British General who was Commander-in-Chief of British forces during the American Revolutionary War, one of the three Howe brothers. ...


The result was a victory for the British, however, they suffered their greatest losses of the entire war: over 800 wounded and 228 killed. The colonists held on and repelled the first two attacks. Finally the colonists' ammunition supplies ran out and on their third assault, the British forces overran the revolutionaries' fortified earthworks on Breed's and Bunker's Hills. Afterwards, British General Henry Clinton remarked in his diary that "A few more such victories would have shortly put an end to British dominion in America."[1][2] General Sir Henry Clinton K.B. Commander-in-Chief of British troops in America. ...


Howe's immediate objective was achieved, but did not affect the siege; it did, however, demonstrate that the American Colonists were willing to stand up to a pitched battle. Colonel William Prescott gave the order, "Don't shoot until you see the whites of their eyes!" For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... The Super Sexy and hot Statue of Colonel William Prescott in Charlestown, Massachusetts. ...

Contents

Geography

The Charlestown Peninsula started from a short, narrow isthmus (known as the "Neck") at its northwest, extending about one mile (1,600 meters) southeastward into Boston Harbor. Bunker Hill is an elevation (110 feet or 34 meters) at the north of the peninsula and Breed's Hill, at a height of 62 feet (19 meters), is more southerly and nearer to Boston. The town of Charlestown occupied the flats at the southern end. At its closest approach, less than 1,000 feet (300 meters) separated Charlestown Peninsula from the Boston Peninsula, specifically, an area occupied by Copp's Hill at about the same height as Breed's Hill. A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... For other uses, see Isthmus (disambiguation). ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ...


Battle

1775 map of the Boston area (contains some inaccurate information)
1775 map of the Boston area (contains some inaccurate information)
The first British attack on Bunker Hill. Colored areas are hills.
The first British attack on Bunker Hill. Colored areas are hills.

On the night of June 16-17, Colonial Colonel William Prescott led 1,500 men onto the peninsula. At first, Putnam, Prescott, and their engineering officer, Captain Richard Gridley, disagreed as to where they should locate their defense. Breed's Hill was viewed as much more defensible, and they decided to build their primary redoubt there. Prescott and his men, using Gridley's outline, began digging a fortification 160 feet (50 m) long and 80 feet (25 m) wide with ditches and earthen walls.[3] They added ditch and dike extensions toward the Charles River on their right and began reinforcing a fence running to their left. Download high resolution version (3211x2476, 1589 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (3211x2476, 1589 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (568x687, 35 KB) Description First attack at the Battle of Bunker Hill, 17 June 1775 Author/Source The Department of History, United States Military Academy Licensing In the public domain as an original work of the United States federal government and... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (568x687, 35 KB) Description First attack at the Battle of Bunker Hill, 17 June 1775 Author/Source The Department of History, United States Military Academy Licensing In the public domain as an original work of the United States federal government and... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Super Sexy and hot Statue of Colonel William Prescott in Charlestown, Massachusetts. ... Richard Gridley was an American soldier during the revolution. ... A redoubt is a fort or fort system usually consisting of an enclosed defensive emplacement outside a larger fort. ... The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ...


In the early predawn, around 4 a.m., a sentry on board HMS Lively spotted the new fortification. Lively opened fire, temporarily halting the Colonists' work. Aboard his flagship HMS Somerset, Admiral Samuel Graves awoke irritated by the gunfire which he had not ordered. He stopped it, only to reverse his decision when he got on deck and saw the works. He ordered all 128 guns in the harbor to fire on the Colonists' position, but the broadsides proved largely ineffective since the guns could not be elevated enough to reach the fortifications. HMS Lively was a 20-gun sloop-of-war of the British Royal Navy built in 1754. ... The third HMS Somerset was built at Chatham in 1748 and saw action at the capture of Louisberg and Cape Bretton Island during the Seven Years War. ... Samuel Graves (*1713 †1787) was a British Admiral who fought for the British in the American Revolution. ... USS Iowa firing her guns broadside (1984). ...


Across the narrow channel in Boston stood General Gage, his staff, and loyalist Abijah Willard. Upon looking through a telescope, Willard recognized his brother-in-law Colonel Prescott. "Will he fight?' asked Gage. "[A]s to his men, I cannot answer for them;" replied Willard "but Colonel Prescott will fight you to the gates of hell."[4]


Prescott did live up to Willard's word, but his men were not so resolute. When the Colonists suffered their first casualty, Asa Pollard of Billerica, a young private killed by cannon fire, Prescott gave orders to bury the man quickly and quietly, but a large group of men gave him a solemn funeral instead, with several deserting shortly thereafter.[4]


It took almost six hours to organize an infantry force and to gather up and inspect the men on parade. General Howe was to lead the major assault, drive around the Colonist's left flank, and take them from the rear. Brigadier General Robert Pigot on the British left flank would lead the direct assault on the redoubt. Major John Pitcairn led the flank or reserve force. It took several trips in longboats to transport Howe's forces to the eastern corner of the peninsula, known as Moulton's Hill. On a warm day, with wool tunics and full field packs of about 60 pounds (27 kg), the British were finally ready by about 2 p.m. This article is about the military tactic. ... Sir Robert Pigot, Baronet (1720 – August 1, 1796) was a British Army officer during the American Revolutionary War. ... John Pitcairn (1722–June 17, 1775) was a British Marine who was stationed in Boston, Massachusetts at the start of the American Revolutionary War. ...


The Colonists, seeing this activity, had also called for reinforcements. Troops reinforcing the forward positions included the 1st and 3rd New Hampshire regiments of 200 men, under Colonels John Stark and James Reed (both later became generals). Stark's men took positions along the fence on the north end of the Colonist's position. When low tide opened a gap along the Mystic River along the northeast of the peninsula, they quickly extended the fence with a short stone wall to the north ending at the water's edge on a small beach. Gridley or Stark placed a stake about 100 feet (30 m) in front of the fence and ordered that no one fire until the regulars passed it. Private (later Major) John Simpson, however, disobeyed and fired as soon as he had a clear shot, thus starting the battle. The battle of Bunker Hill, had begun. // The 1st New Hampshire Regiment was authorized as New Hampshire State Troops on 22 May 1775 and was organized as ten companies of 800 volunteers from Hillsborough and Rockingham counties of the colony of New Hampshire at Medford, Massachusetts commanded by John Stark and was adopted into the Continental Army... The 3rd New Hampshire Regiment was formed on June 1, 1775 as the third of three Continental Army regiments raised by the state of New Hampshire during the American Revolution. ... For other persons named John Stark, see John Stark (disambiguation). ... James Reed (1724-1807) was born in Lunenburg, Massachusetts. ... For other uses, see Mystic River (disambiguation). ... The Regular Army is the permanent force of the United States Army or any Countrys army that is maintained during peacetime, as opposed to those persons who may be part of a reserve or national guard outfit. ... Major John Simpson (d. ...


Just prior to the action, additional reinforcements arrived, including portions of Massachusetts regiments of Colonels Brewer, Nixon, Woodbridge, Little, and Major Moore, and Callender's company of artillery. John Nixon (1724-1815) was a an American Brigadier General in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. ... Benjamin Ruggles Woodbridge (1739–1819) of South Hadley, Massachusetts, was a doctor, a colonel of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War,[1] and a member of the Massachusetts legislature for many years. ...

The second British attack on Bunker Hill.

General Howe detached both the light infantry companies and grenadiers of all the regiments available. Along the narrow beach, the far right flank of the Colonist position, Howe set his light infantry. They lined up four across and several hundred deep, led by officers in scarlet red jackets. Behind the crude stone wall stood Stark's men. In the middle of the British lines, to attack the rail fence between the beach and redoubt stood Reed's men and the remainder of Stark's New Hampshire regiment. To oppose them, Howe assembled all the flank companies of grenadiers in the first line, supported by the 5th and 52nd Regiments' line companies. The attack on the redoubt itself was led by Brigadier General Robert Pigot, commanding the 38th and 43rd line companies, along with the Marines. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (840x1016, 63 KB) Description The second attack at the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17 1775 Author/Source United States Military Academy File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (840x1016, 63 KB) Description The second attack at the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17 1775 Author/Source United States Military Academy File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not...

The third and final British attack on Bunker Hill

Prescott had been steadily losing men. He lost very few to the bombardment but assigned ten volunteers to carry the wounded to the rear. Others took advantage of the confusion to join the withdrawal. Two generals did join Prescott's force, but both declined command and simply fought as individuals.[5] By the time the battle had started, 1,400 defenders faced 2,600 regulars. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (717x867, 63 KB) Description The final attack on Bunker Hill, 17 June 1775 Author/Source United States Military Academy File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Battle of... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (717x867, 63 KB) Description The final attack on Bunker Hill, 17 June 1775 Author/Source United States Military Academy File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Battle of...


The first assaults on the fence line and the redoubt were met with massed fire at close range and repulsed, with heavy British losses. The reserve, gathering just north of the town, was also taking casualties from rifle fire in the town. Howe's men reformed on the field and made a second unsuccessful attack at the wall.


By this time, the Colonists had lost all fire discipline. In traditional battles of the eighteenth century, companies of men fired, reloaded, and moved on specific orders, as they had been trained (see the warfare tactics section in "Muskets"). After their initial volley, the Colonists fought as individuals, each man firing as quickly as he could. The British withdrew almost to their original positions on the peninsula to regroup. The navy, along with artillery from Copp's Hill on the Boston peninsula, fired heated shot into Charlestown. All 400 or so buildings and the docks were completely burned, but the snipers withdrew safely. Fire Discipline is a system of communication in the military, primarily the Artillery. ... Muskets and bayonets aboard the frigate Grand Turk. ... Muskets and bayonets aboard the frigate Grand Turk. ... For other uses, see Sniper (disambiguation). ...


In the third British assault the reserves were included and both flanks concentrated on the redoubt. This attack was successful. The defenders had run out of ammunition, reducing the battle to close combat. The British had the advantage here as their troops were equipped with bayonets on their muskets but most of the Colonists did not have them. The US Marine Corps OKC-3S bayonet A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife- or dagger-shaped weapon designed to fit on or over the muzzle of a rifle or similar weapon. ... A musket is a muzzle-loaded, smooth-bore long gun. ...


The British advance, and the Colonists' withdrawal, swept through the entire peninsula, including Bunker Hill as well as Breed's Hill. However, under Putnam, the Colonists were quickly in new positions on the mainland. Coupled with the exhaustion of Howe's troops, there was little chance of advancing on Cambridge and breaking the siege.


Aftermath

A historic map of Bunker Hill featuring military notes
A historic map of Bunker Hill featuring military notes

The British had taken the ground but at a great loss; 1,054 were shot (226 dead and 828 wounded), and a disproportionate number of these were officers. The Colonial losses were only about 450, of whom 140 were killed (including Joseph Warren), and 30 captured (20 of whom died later as POWs). Most Colonial losses came during the withdrawal. Major Andrew McClary was the highest ranking Colonial officer to die in the battle (also reportedly the last casualty). He was commemorated by the dedication of a fort in Kittery, Maine as Fort McClary. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 574 pixelsFull resolution (2208 × 1584 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 574 pixelsFull resolution (2208 × 1584 pixel, file size: 2. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Location of town of Kittery in state of Maine Kittery is a town located in York County, Maine. ... The renovated blockhouse of Fort McClary, dating from 1844, which now serves as a museum. ...


British dead and wounded included most of their officers. Of General Howe's entire field staff, he was the only one who was not shot. Major Pitcairn had been killed, and Colonel James Abercrombie fatally wounded. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The attitude of the British was significantly changed, both individually and as a government. Thomas Gage was soon recalled and was replaced by General Howe shortly afterward. Gage's report to the cabinet repeated his earlier warnings that "a large army must at length be employed to reduce these people" and would require "the hiring of foreign troops." In mathematics, the Hessian matrix of a function of several real variables is the (symmetric) matrix of all second partial derivatives. ...


The famous order, "Don't fire until you see the whites of their eyes" was popularized by stories about Bunker Hill. However, it is uncertain as to who said it, since various writers attribute it to Putnam, Stark, Prescott or Gridley. The original use of this quote came from the Battle of Dettingen on 27 June 1743, where Lieutenant-Colonel Andrew Agnew of Lochnaw warned his Regiment, The Royal Scots Fusiliers, not to fire until they could “see the white’s of their e’en.” Some doubt is purposed if anyone at the Battle Of Bunker Hill said it at all, and instead, is a historical mistake confusing the two battles. At any rate, it was not a brilliant and original piece of field generalship: it was a reasonably common order at the time. The Royal Scots Fusiliers was a Regiment of the British Army. ...


Colonial Volunteers

According to the John Trumbull painting, the flag carried by the colonists during the battle was this historical flag of New England
This flag, known as the Bunker Hill flag, is associated with the battle
This flag, known as the Bunker Hill flag, is associated with the battle

Among the Colonial volunteers in the battle were: Image File history File links New_England_pine_flag. ... Image File history File links New_England_pine_flag. ...

  • William Barton
  • John Brooks physician,Major General, Governor of Massachusetts
  • Henry Burbeck, Brigadier General
  • Henry Dearborn, physician, Congressman, Secretary of War, Major General and Senior Officer of the United States Army, Minister Plenipotentiary to Portugal
  • William Eustis, physician, Congressman, Secretary of War, Governor of Massachusetts, Ambassador to Holland
  • Christian Febiger, Brigadier General (by brevet), Treasurer for the Commonwealth of Philadelphia
  • Thomas Gardner, Colonel, mortally wounded at the Battle of Bunker Hill
  • Thomas Knowlton, Colonel
  • Henry Knox, Major General, Secretary of War
  • James Otis
  • Israel Potter
  • Daniel Shays led an army of farmers in Shays' Rebellion
  • William Stacy, Colonel, Ohio pioneer

John Brooks, Jr. ... Henry Burbeck (June 10, 1754 – October 2, 1848), son of William Burbeck and Jerusha Glover was born in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Henry Dearborn (February 23, 1751 – June 6, 1829) was an American physician, statesman and veteran of both the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. ... William Eustis (June 10, 1753–February 6, 1825) was an early American statesman. ... Col. ... Col. ... Thomas Knowlton (1740–1776) was an American patriot who served in the French and Indian War and acted as a Colonel during the American Revolution. ... Henry Knox (July 25, 1750 – October 25, 1806) was an American bookseller from Boston who became the chief artillery officer of the Continental Army and later the nations first Secretary of War. ... Israel Potter: His Fifty Years of Exile is a novel by Herman Melville published in installments in Putnams Monthly Magazine from July 1854 through March 1855, in book form by George Palmer Putnam in New York in March 1855, and in a pirated edition by George Routledge in London... Engraving depicting Nick Gaskin (left) and Job Shattuck Nickolas Jarrod Gaskin (Born July 9, 1990), is a teenager in Forrest City, Arkansas. ... Shays Rebellion was an armed uprising in Western Massachusetts from 1786 to 1787. ... William Stacy (1734–1802) was an officer of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War and a pioneer to the Ohio Country. ...

African-Americans

Less well-known are the approximately three dozen African-American soldiers, including:

  • Phillip Abbot of Andover, Massachusetts-killed in the battle
  • Alexander Ames
  • Isaiah Bayoman
  • Cuff Blanchard
  • Titus Coburn
  • Grant Cooper
  • Caesar Dickenson
  • Charlestown Eaads
  • Alexander Eames
  • Blaney Grusha-servant to Col Micah Stone-Died Feb 7,1820 Framingham Mass
  • Jude Hall
  • Cuff Haynes
  • Cato Howe
  • Caesar Jahar
  • Barzillai Lew
  • Pompy of Braintree
  • Salem Poor
  • Caesar Post
  • Job Potama
  • Robin of Sandowne, New Hampshire
  • Peter Salem aka "Salem Middlesex"
  • Seasor of York County
  • Sampson Talbot
  • Cato Tufts
  • Cuff Whitemore

Barzillai Lew (November 5, 1743-January 18, 1822) African American soldier and musician, served in the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. ... Salem Poor (c. ... Peter Salem was a black slave who lived during the American Revolution. ...

British Officers

Among the British Officers were:

For other persons named Burgoyne, see Burgoyne (disambiguation). ... General Sir Henry Clinton K.B. Commander-in-Chief of British troops in America. ... The title Duke of Northumberland was created in 1551 for John Dudley. ... Francis, 1st Marquess of Hastings (Earl of Moira) Francis Rawdon-Hastings, 1st Marquess of Hastings, (9 December 1754 - 28 November 1826) was a British politician and military officer who served as Governor-General of India from 1813 to 1823. ... A Grenadier was originally a specialized assault trooper for siege operations, first established as a distinct role in the early 17th century. ...

British Officer Casualties

The following 29 British officers were either killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill, died of wounds received or were wounded and presumably made a recovery.Of the 29 officers, there were 2 Ensigns, 12 Lieutenants, 11 captains, 3 majors and 1 Lieutenant-Colonel. This list is not complete but indicates the high rate of casualties among the British officers:

The Battle of Bunker Hill, Howard Pyle, 1897
The Battle of Bunker Hill, Howard Pyle, 1897
  • Lieutenant-Colonel James Abercrombie, 22nd Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Ensign Balaquire, 5th Foot - wounded at Bunker Hill
  • Lieutenant Bard, 35th Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Lieutenant Bruere, 14th Foot (serving as volunteer) - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Captain Campbell, HM Marines - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Ensign Charleton, 5th Foot - wounded at Bunker Hill
  • Lieutenant Croker, 5th Foot - wounded at Bunker Hill
  • Lieutenant Dalrymple, 63rd Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Captain Davidson, 52nd Foot - wounded at Bunker Hill
  • Captain Patrick Downs, 5th Foot - mortally wounded at Bunker Hill and died in the evening
  • Lieutenant Dutton, 38th Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Captain Ellis, HM Marines - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Lieutenant Finnie, HM Marines - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Lieutenant Gardner, HM Marines - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Lieutenant Gold, 47th Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Captain George Harris, 5th Foot - wounded at Bunker Hill (shot in head, recovered, and later became a General and created 1st Baron Harris)
  • Lieutenant Higgins, 52nd Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Lieutenant Hillard, 47th Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Captain Hudson, 65th Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Captain John Jackson, 5th Foot - wounded at Bunker Hill
  • Captain Mackenzi, 43rd Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Lieutenant M’Clintockx, 5th Foot - wounded at Bunker Hill
  • Captain Francis Marsden, 5th Foot - wounded at Bunker Hill, after living for another 5 years died at Burntwood Hall, February 12, 1780, presumably from wounds received. Monument inside Wakefield Cathedral, West Yorkshire
  • Major Pask, 52nd Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Major John Pitcairn, HM Marines - mortally wounded at Bunker Hill and died in the evening
  • Lieutenant Shea, HM Marines - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Captain Sherwin, 67th Foot - killed at Bunker Hill - Aide-de-camp to General Howe
  • Captain Smith, 52nd Foot - killed at Bunker Hill
  • Major Williams, 52nd Foot - killed at Bunker Hill

Image File history File links Bunker_Hill_by_Pyle. ... Image File history File links Bunker_Hill_by_Pyle. ... Howard Pyle (March 5, 1853-November 9, 1911) was an American illustrator and writer, primarily of books for young audiences. ... The Cheshire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Prince of Wales Division. ... The 5th (Northumberland Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot (nickname the Shiners due to their pristine uniforms) was a British infantry regiment until 1881 when it became a county regiment, the Northumberland Fusiliers. ... The 35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment in the British Army . ... The West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Waless Own) (14th Foot) was an infantry regiment of the British Army. ... The 63rd Regiment of Foot known as The Bloodsuckers, was a British Army regiment in the 18th and 19th centuries. ... Three regiments of the British Army have been numbered the 52nd Regiment of Foot: Sir Charles Powletts Regiment of Marines, numbered as 52nd Foot in 1747 52nd Regiment of Foot, raised in 1755 and renumbered as the 50th in 1756. ... The Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales) (or simply Staffords for short) is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Prince of Wales Division. ... The 47th (Lancashire) Regiment of Foot was a regiment of the British Army. ... George Harris, 1st Baron Harris, GCB (March 18, 1746 - 1829), British general, was the son of the Rev George Harris, curate of Brasted, Kent. ... The Barony of Harris of Seringapatam and Mysore was created in 1815 in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... The 65th (2nd Yorkshire, North Riding) Regiment of Foot was a British Army infantry regiment formed in 1758 from the redesignation of the 2nd Battalion, 12th Regiment of Foot. ... The 43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army. ... Burntwood Hall lies near the village of Great Houghton, West Yorkshire and has been known as Burntwood Nook, Burntwood Lodge and Burntwood Hall over the centuries. ... Wakefield Cathedral, formally the Cathedral Church of All Saints Wakfield is the cathedral for the Church of Englands Diocese of Wakefield and is the seat of the Bishop of Wakefield. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... John Pitcairn (1722–June 17, 1775) was a British Marine who was stationed in Boston, Massachusetts at the start of the American Revolutionary War. ... The 67th (South Hampshire) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1758 and amalgamated into The Hampshire Regiment in 1881. ...

Commemorations

Bunker Hill Monument, 2001. ... The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris Obelisk outside Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome. ... Marie-Joseph-Paul-Roch-Yves-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (September 6, 1757 – May 20, 1834), was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American Revolutionary War and early French Revolution. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... In the United States, a holiday is a day set aside by a nation or culture (in some cases, multiple nations and cultures) typically for celebration but sometimes for some other kind of special culture-wide (or national) observation or activity. ... Suffolk County is a county located in the state of Massachusetts. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1842 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone Area  - Total 4. ... Middlesex is the name of several places: In England: Middlesex, a traditional county of England, The original use of this place name. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ...

See also

The Royal Welch Fusiliers was a regiment of the British Army, part of the Prince of Wales Division. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Breeds Hill is the actual site where the Battle of Bunker Hill took place during the American Revolution, located in the Charlestown section of Boston, Massachusetts. ...

References and further reading

  • Adams, Charles Francis (April 1896). "The Battle of Bunker Hill". The American Historical Review 1 (3): 401-413. 
  • Doyle, Peter: Bunker Hill; (young peoples book); 1998, Providence Foundation; ISBN 1-887456-08-2.
  • Elting, John R.: The Battle of Bunker's Hill; 1975, Phillip Freneau Pres (56 pages), Monmouth, New Jersey; ISBN 0-912480-11-4
  • Fast, Howard: Bunker Hill; 2001, ibooks inc., New York; ISBN 0-7434-2384-4
  • Frothingham, Jr., Richard: History of the Siege of Boston and of the Battles of Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill, Second Edition, published by Charles C. Little and James Brown, Boston (1851). This historical book is available online via the Google Books Library Project at http://books.google.com/books?id=xl4sAAAAMAAJ Frothingham.
  • Graydon, Alexander. Memoirs of His Own Time: With Reminiscences of the Men and Events of the Revolution Edited by John Stockton Littell. Lindsay & Blakiston, Philadelphia, 1846. This historical book is available online via the Google Books Library Project at http://books.google.com/books?id=wvQEAAAAYAAJ
  • Ketchum, Richard:Decisive Day: The Battle of Bunker Hill; 1999, Owl Books; ISBN 0-385-41897-3 (Paperback: ISBN 0-8050-6099-5)
  • The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition. Edited by E.D. Hirsch, Jr., Joseph F. Kett, and James Trefil. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. 2002.
  • Swett, S.: History of Bunker Hill Battle, With a Plan, Second Edition, Munroe and Francis, Boston (1826). This historical book is available online via the Google Books Library Project at http://books.google.com/books?id=QM3KyrZKnZAC.

Charles Francis Adams, Jr. ...

Notes and citations

  1. ^ Clinton, Henry. The American Rebellion: Sir Henry Clinton's Narrative of His Campaigns, 1775-1782. William B. Willcox ed. Yale University Press, 1954, p. 19
    http://books.google.com/books?id=H2AsAAAAMAAJ
  2. ^ General Clinton's remark is an echoing of Pyrrhus' original sentiment after the Battle of Heraclea, "one more such victory and the cause is lost".
  3. ^ Benjamin Cotterell, a resident of a small settlement named Poestenkill, is said to have carried the first wheelbarrow of earth to the battle.
  4. ^ a b Graydon, Alexander. Memoirs of His Own Time: With Reminiscences of the Men and Events of the Revolution Edited by John Stockton Littell. Lindsay & Blakiston, Philadelphia, 1846, p. 424
    http://books.google.com/books?id=wvQEAAAAYAAJ
  5. ^ One of the generals who declined command was Dr. Joseph Warren, the president of the Council and acting head of Massachusetts revolutionary government. He declined because his commission as a Major General was not yet effective. The second general was Seth Pomeroy. Pomeroy, a veteran of both King George's War and the French and Indian War perhaps declined because of age. He was 69.
  6. ^ Hayward, John. A Gazetteer of the United States of America. self published, 1854, p. 322.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=hlJ_1U2IaAIC

Pyrrhus can be: Pyrrhus or Neoptolemus, son of Achilles Pyrrhus of Epirus, king of Epirus in the 3rd century BC This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Combatants Roman Republic Epirus, Magna Graecia Commanders Publius Valerius Laevinus Pyrrhus of Epirus Strength 29,000 infantry, 6,000 cavalry 31,500 infantry, 4,000 cavalry, 20 war elephants Casualties 7,000 dead 4,000 dead The Battle of Heraclea took place in 280 BC between the Romans under the... This article is about the American doctor, soldier and statesman during the American Revolutionary War. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Seth Pomeroy (May 20, 1706 – February 9, 1777) was an American gunsmith and soldier from Northampton, Massachusetts. ... King Georges War is the name given to the duck operations in North America that formed part of the 1740–1748 War of the Austrian Succession. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and...

External links

Wikisource has the text of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article Bunker Hill.
Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle of Bunker Hill - MSN Encarta (383 words)
Battle of Bunker Hill, first large-scale engagement of the American Revolution, fought on June 17, 1775, in Charlestown (now part of Boston), Massachusetts.
At issue in the battle was possession of Bunker Hill (34 m/110 ft) and Breed's Hill (23 m/75 ft), adjoining heights dominating Boston Harbor.
An obelisk, the Bunker Hill Monument, stands on Breed's Hill in commemoration of the battle.
BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL MAP - Archiving Early America (492 words)
In all of the twenty battles of the Revolution, Bunker Hill exacted a heavy toll on British officers.
In this one battle alone one-eighth of the British officers in the entire War were killed and one-sixth were wounded on that day.
Bunker Hill showed the Americans that the British were not invincible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m