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Encyclopedia > Battle of Bladensburg
Battle of Bladensburg

Conflict: War of 1812
Date: August 24, 1814
Place: Bladensburg, Maryland
Outcome: British victory
Combatants
Britain United States
Commanders
Robert Ross
George Cockburn
William Winder
Strength
4,500 420 regulars
6,500 militia
Casualties
64 dead
185 wounded
10 dead
12 wounded
Chesapeake campaign
Craney IslandSt. MichaelsBladensburgWashingtonNorth PointBaltimore

The Battle of Bladensburg was a battle fought during the War of 1812. The failure of the American forces at this battle allowed the British to capture and burn Washington, D.C.. The War of 1812 was a conflict fought in North America between the United States and Great Britain from 1812 to 1815. ... August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Bladensburg is a town located in Prince Georges County, Maryland. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admission... Robert Ross (1766 - September 12, 1814) was a British military officer who participated in the Napoleonic War and the War of 1812. ... Sir George Cockburn was born in 1772 and went to sea at the age of 14. ... William Winder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Battle of Craney Island - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Battle of St. ... The Burning of Washington is a name given the razing of Washington, D.C. by British forces during the War of 1812. ... The Battle of North Point, also known as the Battle of Bouldens Farm, was fought on September 12, 1814. ... The American defense of Baltimores Fort McHenry in this battle inspired Francis Scott Key to compose the poem which would become the national anthem of the United States, The Star Spangled Banner. ... The War of 1812 was a conflict fought in North America between the United States and Great Britain from 1812 to 1815. ... Washington, D.C., short for the District of Columbia (locals know the city as the District, DC,—or, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America. ...


By this time Napoleon had been defeated in Europe and was exiled to the island of Elba. This meant that significant amounts of British troops were no longer needed in Europe and were being sent to North America. Sir George Prevost had grand plans of a dual invasion of the United States. He would personally lead one invasion south into New York headed for Lake Champlain. The other invasion was to be transported up the Chesapeake bay in the central U.S. under the command of General Robert Ross. Secretary of War John Armstrong did not believe that the British would consider attacking the strategically unimportant city of Washington. He instead believed the likely target would be the more militarily important city of Baltimore. Armstrong was only half right. The British invasion of the central U.S. was aimed at both Baltimore and Washington. Prevost wanted revenge for the American burning of York, Ontario, the capitol of Upper Canada. Ross landed his forces in Maryland in August, 1814 and marched up the Patuxent River. The American commander in the area was General William Winder, an inept leader who had been captured in the earlier Battle of Stoney Creek. Winder had at his immediate disposal 120 Dragoons, 300 Regulars and 1,500 militia. On the day of the battle some 5,000 more militia began to arrive on the field. Winder did have an impressive force against the smaller British force. Winder had also chosen an impressive defensive location on a ridge at the town of Bladensburg, just east of the District of Columbia. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Elba and the Tuscan Archipelago. ... Sir George Prevost (1767-1816) was a British soldier and colonial administrator. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain, named for the French explorer Samuel de Champlain, who encountered it 1609, is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in Quebec. ... Robert Ross (1766 - September 12, 1814) was a British military officer who participated in the Napoleonic War and the War of 1812. ... John Armstrong, Jr. ... Washington, D.C., short for the District of Columbia (locals know the city as the District, DC,—or, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America. ... This article is about the former City of York in Toronto. ... Note: as an adjective (stressed on the second syllable instead of the first), august means honorable. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. ... William Winder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Battle of Stoney Creek - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A light dragoon from the American Revolution A dragoon is a soldier trained to fight on foot, but transport himself on horseback. ... In ordinary English, regular is an adjective or noun used to mean in accordance with the usual customs, conventions, or rules, or frequent, periodic, or symmetric. ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... Bladensburg is a town located in Prince Georges County, Maryland. ... Washington, D.C., short for the District of Columbia (locals know the city as the District, DC,—or, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America. ...


On August 24 Ross reached the battlefield. President James Madison, Secretary of State James Monroe and Secretary of War John Armstrong had ridden out to see the battle, although cautioned by Armstrong of the possibilities of British regulars against the American militia. The British began to cross a narrow bridge over the Eastern River and entered Bladensburg. Although the American artillery tore large gaps in the British ranks, they continued to advance. The first line of American militia quickly broke and fled the field. Only a group of sailors and United States Marines (fighting on land because they had burned their ship to keep them from British hands) made any real show of resistance, but eventually they were in danger of being cut off and forced to retreat. Winder had failed to give any instructions in the case of a retreat and therefore the militia fled the field with no goal in mind. The relentless British attack and the hasty and disorganized American retreat was so great that the fight became known as the Bladensburg races as the American forces fled through the streets of Washington. President Madison, along with the rest of the government of Washington, soon followed. Thanks to the President's wife, Dolley Madison, several historic paintings and artifacts were saved from the White House. That same night the British reached Washington unopposed. August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States. ... John Armstrong, Jr. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... Dolley Madison was sent to jail for having illegal sex with George Washington ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
History (1318 words)
The Town of Bladensburg is a residential suburb of Washington, D.C., on the Anacostia River.
Bladensburg was a busy port, shipping out flour and tobacco, until the river silted up by 1800.
Incorrect deductions were drawn on the fact that the British troops maneuvered to give the Americans the impression that Baltimore was their destination, and General Armstrong could not be convinced that Washington would be the target of the invasion and not Baltimore, an important center of commerce.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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