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Encyclopedia > Batsuit
Batman's current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. Art by Jim Lee.
Batman's current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. Art by Jim Lee.

The Batsuit (also Bat-Suit) is the costume of the DC Comics superhero, Batman. Though the suit has been drawn many different ways by different artists, and the stories themselves have described Batman as modifying the details of his costume from time to time, it is most often depicted as consisting of a scalloped cape, a bat-like cowl, a pair of gloves, boots, a yellow utility belt, and dark briefs over a tight-fitting body suit with the image of a bat emblazoned on the chest. Image File history File links Art by Jim Lee [and Scott Williams?] from Batman #608 [second printing], December 2002. ... Image File history File links Art by Jim Lee [and Scott Williams?] from Batman #608 [second printing], December 2002. ... Published 2002-2003 in monthly installments in Batman issues 608-619 by DC Comics Characters Batman (Bruce Wayne), Catwoman (Selina Kyle), Superman (Clark Kent), Nightwing (Dick Grayson), Robin (Tim Drake), The Joker, The Riddler, Hush, Scarecrow, Huntress, Ras al Ghul, Lex Luthor, Two-Face, Commissioner James Gordon, Oracle, Harley... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Yarkand ladies summer fashions. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Batmans utility belt is the most characteristic portion of Batmans costume, much like Wonder Womans Lasso of Truth, or Green Lanterns power ring. ... A man wearing ribbed briefs For other uses of Brief(s), see Brief Briefs are a type of short, tight Y-shaped underwear and swimwear, as opposed to styles where the material extends down the legs. ... An acrobat in bodystocking/unitard suspended below a balloon A unitard is a skin-tight one-piece garment with long legs and sometimes long sleeves. ...


Batman wears this costume both to conceal his identity, and to frighten criminals. Most versions of the Batsuit incorporate some form of body armor, and often night-vision, gas filters, and other aids to combat effectiveness or protection. All versions of the outfit incorporate a utility belt containing a variety of crimefighting equipment. ... Batmans utility belt is the most characteristic portion of Batmans costume, much like Wonder Womans Lasso of Truth, or Green Lanterns power ring. ...

Contents

Origin and development

Origin

While brooding in his study over how to be a more effective crime fighter, Bruce Wayne saw a bat come through his window (in the earliest Detective Comics portrayal simply flying in an open window, in Post-Crisis continuity such as Batman: Year One, dramatically crashing through the glass) and perch on the bust of his father. Realizing that "criminals are a cowardly and superstitious lot," Bruce adopts the persona of a bat in order to conceal his identity and strike fear into his adversaries. Subsequent origin tales have had Bruce terrified by bats as a child, and observing a bat costume worn by his father at a costume ball, but the primary impetus of his decision to adopt the bat persona has always been the incident of the bat coming in the window of his study. It is as a result of this incident that the batsuit was developed. Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12 issue comic book mini-series produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to clean up their 50-year-old, convoluted and confusing continuity. ... Batman: Year One was the title of a comic book written by Frank Miller, illustrated by David Mazzuchelli and colored/painted by Richmond Lewis, released in 1988 by DC Comics. ...


Color scheme

It was a basic convention of comic books at the time of Batman's creation that black needed a highlight color (usually blue) in order to show detail and give the illusion of three-dimensionality. Over time, the initial blue highlight spread out over the previously black cape and cowl to become the dominant color. Thus artists renditions depict the costume as black and gray or blue and gray. During the 1990s following Bruce Wayne's return to costume after the events of the Knights End storyline, he utilized an all black costume that incorporated some armor advancements that John Paul Valley had created. The bat symbol on the chest has also alternated from a simple black bat to a bat design on a yellow ellipse. The yellow ellipse was introduced in 1964 as part of the "New Look" Batman stories, and was meant to be a connection to the Bat-Signal[citation needed]. In Batman: The Dark Knight Returns it is revealed that the yellow ellipse design was deliberately meant as a target, attracting a potential gunman's aim to the heavily armored chestpiece, and away from Batman's unarmored face. Other elements, such as the utility belt and the length of the cowl's ears, have been changed by various artistic teams. Azrael (Jean-Paul Valley) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... The Bat-Signal in Jim Lees cover art from Batman #608. ... The premiere issue of the series Spoiler warning: The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ...


Basic suit

The basic foundation of the Batsuit is a tight-fitting bodysuit, similar to many superheroes. In early depictions, contrasting briefs are worn over a unitard, similar to the garb of early 20th century circus performers. In modern depictions, the briefs are integrated into the main costume, so that section of the costume constitutes only a seam and color change from the rest of the suit. The body suit has varied in color and style as depicted by different artists: grey tights with dark blue briefs, light blue tights etc. For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... A man wearing ribbed briefs For other uses of Brief(s), see Brief Briefs are a type of short, tight Y-shaped underwear and swimwear, as opposed to styles where the material extends down the legs. ... An acrobat in bodystocking/unitard suspended below a balloon A unitard is a skin-tight one-piece garment with long legs and sometimes long sleeves. ...


The Post-Crisis version of the bodysuit is not constructed from simple fabric, but from Kevlar thread and carbon nanotube fibers[citation needed]. This imparts it with a unique sheen and makes it heavily resistant to tearing. In addition, the suit also is constructed with a full body electric shock delivery system[citation needed], which is also layered into the suits fabric. The basic version of the Batsuit is insulated against electricity and is mildly fire resistant. Batman utilizes many different body armor designs, some of which are constructed into his Batsuits, and others which are separate. In its most basic version, the suit is bulletproof around the upper torso and back and can withstand a point blank range blast from a 12-gauge shotgun. Other versions are entirely bullet proof to small arms fire, and have advanced flexible armor plating made from Carbon composites and lightweight metal polymers. Kevlars molecular structure; BOLD: monomer unit; DASHED: hydrogen bonds. ... // 3D model of three types of single-walled carbon nanotubes. ... Point-blank range is the distance between a gun and a target such that it requires minimal effort in aiming it, in particular no allowance needs to be made for the effects of gravity, target movement or wind in aiming the projectile. ...


Cape

A revised incarnation of the "New Look" Batman costume by Neal Adams.

As different artists have taken over the responsibility of drawing the character, the details of the suit have changed considerably. The original incarnation of the cape was a wing-like structure inspired by drawings by Leonardo Da Vinci[citation needed]. This eventually evolved into a more cape-like design of varying length. Some artists draw the cape with protrusions on the shoulders, likely representing the "thumb" part of a bat's wing, though this is not a consistent addition. The cape is occasionally depicted as bulletproof.[1] The cape varies according to the current writer, sometimes being depicted as bulletproof and fire resistant, and other times being nothing more than simple fabric that tears easily and sustains constant damage and is continuously replaced. For example, in the Batman: The Animated Series episode "Robin's Reckoning", Batman fell through a floor heavily compromised by machine-gun fire and landed badly, hurting his leg. He ripped up his cape and used some pieces of broken wood to make an impromtu ankle splint. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (618x956, 144 KB) From Batman #251 This image is a single panel from a comic strip or the interior of a single issue of a comic book and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (618x956, 144 KB) From Batman #251 This image is a single panel from a comic strip or the interior of a single issue of a comic book and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... A . ... Splint may mean: Splint (programming tool), a tool for checking computer programs Splint (medicine), a medical device for the immobilisation of limbs or spine This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


In film adaptations the cape has also incorporated Nomex fire-resistant/retardant material (as demonstrated in the film Batman Forever) and a Kevlar weave to slow the impact of bullets. The cape ends also contain lead weight tips that prevent the cape from getting tangled or blowing in his face in windy conditions[citation needed]. The weights can also be used for offensive purposes, like injuring an enemy by whipping the cape around. This device was expanded in The Dark Knight Strikes Again where the ends of the cape contained razor-sharp blades which Batman used to slice through several corrupt government officials. In the 2005 film Batman Begins, the cape was also used as a sort of hang glider; when an electric current was applied to the cape, the shape-memory fibers aligned into a semi-rigid form resembling a bat's wings, allowing Batman to glide over the streets and rooftops of Gotham. A more primitive version of this hang-glider concept was presented in Batman Returns, in which a harness folds out of the cape to make it a rigid wing-like structure, then folds back when the wearer rolls forward on the ground after landing. NOMEX® is the brand name of a flame retardant meta-aramid material marketed and first discovered by DuPont in the 1970s. ... Batman Forever is a 1995 superhero film. ... Kevlars molecular structure; BOLD: monomer unit; DASHED: hydrogen bonds. ... The Dark Knight Strikes Again (also refered to as DK2) is a Batman graphic novel by Frank Miller with Lynn Varley. ... The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Begins (video game). ... Hang gliding is one of the windsports. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Returns (video game). ...


Gloves

In the earliest Batman stories of Detective Comics, the costume featured a few curiosities before it evolved in to its more or less standard style. The first gloves were purple in color, ordinary looking, and lacked any sort of scalloped fins or other stylings, and only came to the wrists. The second Batman adventure depicted the character wearing no gloves at all. A few issues later the gloves became longer, and by 1940 the familiar fins were added (in early stories, these pieces originally resembled miniature, scalloped bat wings, but eventually became three simple triangular fins). In some later incarnations, the scallops are attached to a separated bracer worn below the glove around the wrist. In Batman Begins these bracers are part of the costume of the ninja sect Wayne trained with, painted black. Traditionally, the scallops serve a defensive purpose and are used to defend against bladed weapons, such as swords or knives. Additionally, the gloves have been specially treated to be both shock-proof as well as radiation-resistant.[citation needed] The gloves are joint reinforced and the glove designs that incorporate fingertip blades[citation needed] and have joint armor-reinforcement in the glove, from the wrists and knuckles to the fingers. He also has eletrical shockers in the fingertips of his gloves, which are used to control the structure of his cape. Additionally, Batman hides a few pieces of his arsenal in his gloves, such as a lock pick.[2] A bracer is a leather strap or sheath that covers the inside of an archers arm to protect it from the moving bowstring. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Begins (video game). ...


Armor

Batsuit with bullet resistant armor. Art by Scott McDaniel

The Batsuit has been repeatedly updated in order to reflect advances in technology. Originally the costume contained no protective armor, since the creative talent felt that it made Batman seem too powerful to see him shrug off bullet hits[citation needed]. However, the real world advent of various forms of personal protective materials like Kevlar and the realization that being shot while wearing such protection still should be avoided, has led to the costume being re-imagined with varying forms of bulletproof protection. Despite the armor, Batman almost always evades gunfire and is very rarely actually shot. After recovering his spinal cord injury from Bane's attack, Batman reinforced the armor with a material to dampen shocks and impacts to protect him from such abuse. Image File history File links Batbullet. ... Image File history File links Batbullet. ... Kevlars molecular structure; BOLD: monomer unit; DASHED: hydrogen bonds. ... Bane is a fictional character, associated with DC Comics Batman. ...


Cowl

Batman's cowl does more than just conceal his features and strike terror to the hearts of his enemies. Occasionally, the cowl is depicted as having defense mechanisms such as electric shock or stun gas in order to prevent unauthorized removal.[3][4] In Batman Begins, Bruce Wayne mail orders the materials to build the cowl through a maze of untraceable shell companies. To avoid suspicion, Wayne orders very large quantities of 10,000, each part sent to different location, and under different aliases. Because some meta-human criminals have the power to see through solid objects, Batman also lines the cowl with lead to protect his identity.[5] The cowl also contains shifting lenses that identifies suspect's identities, as well as their weak points (through medical records), while simultaneously avoiding the possibility of eye identification. The cowl has special visions, like infrared vision (heat sensors), night vision, and ultraviolet vision.[6] It is implied that Oracle manages his cowl's computer. Recently (in Detective Comics #838), it's been revealed that Batman also has an echolocation system in the cowl. In Batman: The Animated Series, Batman wears a special motorcycle helmet when riding his Batcycle that is molded with bat ears to accommodate his cowl's ears. A Roman Catholic monk wearing a cowl The cowl (from the Latin, cuculla) is a long, outer garment, with wide sleeves, worn by Catholic monks when participating in the liturgy. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Begins (video game). ... Metahuman is a term, coined by the fictitious alien Dominators (in DC Comics Invasion! miniseries), used to describe any human being with what are commonly described as super powers. The justification for this alternate phrase is that super implies a value judgement – is super-strength somehow better than normal strength... General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series Post-transition metals or poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... Two white motorcycle helmets, full-face and open-face. ... The Batcycle from Batman: The Movie. ...


In addition, one of the cowl's ears carries a high-gain antenna for an internal comm-link on the left side of the cowl, allowing Batman to stay in contact with his allies.[7] The comm-link can also scan police radios and other communication frequencies. It also carries an inertial navigation unit to keep him in balance when facing foes such as the Scarecrow or Count Vertigo.[8] The cowl's Kevlar panels provide protection over vulnerable skull areas against internal ballistics. The front of the skull and the sides of the temples also have small armor inserts to increase the effectiveness of skull strikes and protect from concussive blows. Repeated encounters with the Mad Hatter also forced Batman to shield his cowl against the villain's mind control. Its basic design has remained unchanged; however, it has been frequently updated to advance Batman's crusade. The one aspect of the cowl that does undergo variations is the ears, although the length and pointiness of the ears is primarily due to the style of the artist drawing Batman, and tends not to be tied to the functionality of the cowl in any way[citation needed]. This article deals with the Scarecrow of DC Comics. ... Count Werner Vertigo is a DC Comics supervillain. ... The Mad Hatter is a fictional character in the Batman comics, published by DC Comics. ...


Boots

In Batman: Year One, it is depicted that Batman hid a few pieces of his arsenal in his leather boots, such as a blow gun with fast-acting anesthetic darts and an ultrasonic device built into his left heel. Batman's boots are highly unique. The basic design of the boots are modeled on Tactical boots, but they are made from lightweight rubbers and are much more flexible to allow for full extension when kicking. The boots feature a unique "slingshot" ankle reinforcement design that acts as both armor and as reinforcement for the ankle joint when kicking or landing from high distances. The bottom is a flexible split sole design and is textured to for a variety of surfaces. The boots also have steel toes, making them much more effective when on the offensive. Despite that Batman is already an accomplished Olympic level diver, during the Batman: Hush storyline, it is revealed that he installed underwater propellers in the heels. In Batman Begins, a boot heel is revealed to contain a hypersonic signaling device capable of calling live bats to it (presumably, from the Batcave) as a form of protection and cover for Batman during a getaway.[9] This device was originally introduced in the Batman: Year One series.


Utility belt and other equipment

Main article: Batman's utility belt

Batman's utility belt is his most characteristic prop, much like Wonder Woman's Lasso of Truth, or Green Lantern's ring. The exact contents of this belt are not known because Batman usually changes it to suit his needs. His uncanny ability to carry unusually appropriate tools is legendary. Batman's enemies are especially interested in the utility belt as they believe it will give them an advantage over him, but the belt's pockets are locked and only Batman knows how to open them. Occasionally, the utility belt is depicted as having defense mechanisms such as electric shock or stun gas in order to prevent tampering. Batmans utility belt is the most characteristic portion of Batmans costume, much like Wonder Womans Lasso of Truth, or Green Lanterns power ring. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Wonder Woman holding the Lasso of Truth from Wonder Woman v2 #186. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... This article is about the Green Lantern Corps weapon. ... Alex Ross Jokers Reckoning. ...


The array of devices Batman carries have become more complex over time. The simple coiled rope and batarang scaling equipment became a rocket powered (or compressed air powered) grapple gun.[10] The suit has also carried on different occasions a re-breather device, flash and gas grenades, explosives and a detonator, lockpicks, a signaling device for the Batmobile, electronic surveillance equipment (including video camera and monitor), a forensic kit for gathering crime scene evidence, a medical kit, a cache of money and, in early incarnations, a pistol in a holster. On any occasion where Batman anticipates encountering Superman, he has also carried (in a lead case) a Kryptonite ring given to him by the Man of Steel as a weapon of last resort (in some instances, Batman has acquired - or manufactured - the kryptonite himself, such as Frank Miller's The Dark Knight graphic novels). One exception to this is seen in Kingdom Come, since in that novel, Superman has become impervious to kryptonite. Batman surrounded by batarangs. ... The Batmobile as seen in the 2005 movie Batman Begins. The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the fictional substance. ... This article is about Frank Miller, the comic book writer and artist and movie writer and director. ... A DC Comics Elseworld story written by Mark Waid and painted by Alex Ross, Kingdom Come is a limited series depicting a world after Superman. ...


Variants

Batman keeps variant costumes for dealing with extraordinary situations; for example, he has been shown in a SCUBA variant of his costume, a fireproof version for fighting his enemy Firefly, a thermal insulated version for fighting Mister Freeze, as well as others. Many versions of the hero, including those shown in Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Kingdom Come, Batman Beyond and Batman versus Predator, show him swapping his cloth costume for a suit of powered armor. A scuba diver in usual sport diving gear SCUBA is an acronym for Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus. ... Firefly (Garfield Lynns) is a fictional character in DC Comics created by France Herron and Dick Sprang. ... Mister Freeze(Victor Fries) is of the Batman arch nemesis. ... The premiere issue of the series Spoiler warning: The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ... The cover to Absolute Kingdom Come by Alex Ross (2006) Kingdom Come is a comic book limited series published in 1996 by DC Comics, written by Mark Waid and painted by Alex Ross. ... Batman Beyond (known as Batman of the Future in Europe, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand and India) is an American animated television series created by The WB Television Network in collaboration with DC Comics as a continuation of the Batman legacy. ... Cover of Batman versus Predator. ... It has been suggested that the section Exoskeletons in modern and near-future technology from the article Exoskeleton be merged into this article or section. ...


Jean-Paul Valley's Batsuit

Jean-Paul Valley in his Batman armor.
Jean-Paul Valley in his Batman armor.

In the Knightfall story arc (1992-1994), the character Jean-Paul Valley redesigned the batsuit during his tenure as Batman. Rather than appearing as a new costume, Jean-Paul developed it over time. Valley created an armored suit that contained more gadgets, including a shuriken launcher, flamethrower and other, more lethal weapons. This version of the suit did away with the traditional cape and cowl. It featured armored and bladed wings and was highly bullet proof, capable of sustaining direct machine gun barrages as well as enduring the explosions from grenades and high intensity fire. The suit also featured an underwater rebreather. A circular ammo feeder affixed to the back of the suit provided Valley with continuous Shuriken. This suit has often been seen as a reaction to occasional fan criticism that the batsuit was not high-tech enough for the modern age[citation needed]. In the end, the suit became Valley's vulnerable point, as Bruce realized that his replacement had become too reliant upon the suit's gadgetry. In their final confrontation, Wayne, in his traditional bat costume, tricked Valley into discarding the armor. Upon seeing Wayne revealed in his batsuit under blinding daylight, Valley's fragile mind collapsed and he acknowledged Bruce Wayne as the true Batman. Image File history File links Cover to Detective Comics #667. ... Image File history File links Cover to Detective Comics #667. ... Azrael (Jean-Paul Valley) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Shuriken (手裏剣; lit: hand hidden blade) is a traditional Japanese concealed weapon that was generally used for throwing, and sometimes stabbing or slashing an opponents arteries. ... This article is about the breathing apparatus. ...


The gauntlets from this costume are now being used by Kate Spencer, the current Manhunter, who obtained them from an LAPD evidence room. They had been used by a small-time crook who unsuccessfully robbed the safe of a Gotham lawyer who keeps information on all his supervillain clients' loot. Manhunter is a fictional character, a superhero in publications from DC Comics. ... Manhunter is the name given to several different DC Comics superheroes/antiheroes, as well as the Manhunters an entire race of androids created by the Guardians of the Universe, as a forerunner to the Green Lantern Corps. ... LAPD and L.A.P.D. redirect here. ...


Troika

While no different in terms of gadgets, the batsuit that Batman wears, first in the Troika storyline, is noticeably darker than his default costume, comparable to the batsuits worn in the Tim Burton movies[citation needed]. The costume is also much sturdier than his regular costume, as it is made of Kevlar for added protection. The gauntlets and boots for this Batsuit are also one piece, connected seamlessly to the arms and legs. By Robin #14, Batman substitutes the original gloves and boots for ones of more protective quality, citing his encounter with the Russian Troika. Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ...


Other media appearances

Television

1960s Batman

The Batman television series of the 1960s featured a blue-purple and gray version of the batsuit with a noticeably shorter cape and tiny ears. There were also white eyebrows painted on the cowl. In keeping with the campy nature of the series, the devices on the utility belt were often used as gags, with one of the most bizarre items being a thermos for storing alphabet soup. In one episode, Bruce Wayne carried two capsules that when dropped in a glass of water became full-sized costumes for Batman and Robin, complete with utility belts. In the crossover episode featuring The Green Hornet, Britt Reid refers to Batman's costume as a "goofy purple cape." This article is about the 1960s television series. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... The Green Hornet is a fictional character, a masked crime fighter. ... The Green Hornet (above) and Kato (below). ...


DC animated universe

Batman's different costumes throughout the DC animated universe.
Batman's different costumes throughout the DC animated universe.

In Batman: The Animated Series (1992-1995) the Batsuit lacks any armor qualities, instead being merely a body suit with no apparent special features. It often becomes torn in serious fights. The utility belt is unchanged, however. The cape and cowl (which are at times shown as one piece) are black with a bluish shine to them and the underside of the cape is blue. Also, when he's not fighting, the cape is usually seen covering Batman's entire body below his head. The costume is occasionally seen packed in Bruce Wayne's luggage or in his vehicles, and it is made clear that he has numerous spares. Some changes in the design over time (the coloration, the chest emblem) were made, for both budgetary and aesthetic reasons. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ...


In The New Batman Adventures (1997-1999) whose animation style was based on that of Superman: The Animated Series, Batman's physical appearance changes to match Superman's somewhat. The Batsuit's colors became darker overall and the utility belt used pouches instead of capsules or cylinders. His suit also has extended razors on his gloves. The blue portion of his cape is changed to dark gray, and the cape itself is redesigned to reach over his shoulders. His bat emblem is replaced by larger bat without a yellow ellipse. The New Batman Adventures was the successor to the highly acclaimed American animated television series Batman: The Animated Series. ... Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ...


Batman was again redesigned for Justice League and Justice League Unlimited (2001-2006) where the Batsuit was given a mixture appearance of the past two ones. The costume is generally the same as in The New Batman Adventures, but the brighter colors from Batman: The Animated Series are restored. Additionally, the artists added certain modifications to foreshadow the futuristic Batman Beyond batsuit variant (see below), including the lengthening of the "ears" on the cowl and the addition of heels on the boots. For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ...


In Batman Beyond (1999-2001) an extremely different variant of the Batsuit is featured. The new costume does away with the traditional individual articles of clothing and appears to be a simple black bodysuit with a red chest emblem. However, this version is more than a simple costume. Form fitting and highly responsive, it's actually a "powered suit", similar to an artificial powered exoskeleton. Originally, Bruce designed the suit for himself and wore it to aid his aging body, as the series' storyline was set years after Justice League. When Bruce gave up on being Batman permanently, Terry McGinnis replaced him and became the suit's primary wearer from then on. Giving Terry increased strength, and equipped with sophisticated built in gadgets similar to Jean Paul Valley's variant, it's unlike any other Batsuit in the DCAU. This costume is used in the Superman/Batman comic in which Terry makes his first appereance. Of its several features, the most frequently used are a set of retractable wings and jet boots which, together, allow for flight, an active camouflage system which renders him nearly invisible and a two-way radio and surveillance system that allows Bruce to see and hear everything Terry does and give him advice. Batman Beyond (known as Batman of the Future in Europe, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand and India) is an American animated television series created by The WB Television Network in collaboration with DC Comics as a continuation of the Batman legacy. ... U.S. Army conceptual mockup of an exoskeleton-equipped soldier. ... Terry McGinnis (age 17). ... Azrael (Jean-Paul Valley) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... An image of many of the DCAU heroes. ... Illustrating the concept, i. ... An example of how an object could appear to be invisible through the use of mirrors Invisibility is the state of an object which cannot be seen. ... Motorola HT1000 hand-held two-way radio A two-way radio is a radio that can both transmit and receive (a transceiver), unlike a broadcast receiver which only receives content one way. ... For other uses, see Surveillance (disambiguation). ...


The Batman

In the animated show The Batman (2004-2008), the Batsuit looks almost like the first one in Batman: The Animated Series, but has shorter ears on the cowl to make him look more like a "boxer," claws on his gloves, a slightly redesigned bat symbol with the yellow ellipse on his chest, a more high-tech computerized utility belt, and a longer cape that, just like the original, sometimes covers his entire body below the head. The cape & cowl are seen as one piece as well. The Batman is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ...


Film

Batman

The Batsuit of Batman, worn by Michael Keaton.
The Batsuit of Batman, worn by Michael Keaton.

The Tim Burton films feature a completely black Batsuit (excepting the black-in-yellow field bat-emblem and the utility belt) with heavy armor placed on the chest, forearms, and boots, with the chest armor incorporating the bat-emblem. The basic design of the suit, done by Bob Ringwood, is essentially the Neal Adams version of the costume, which was still in vogue in the comics during the 1980s. This movie suit[11] was notable for its introduction of the grapple gun[12], which was later adopted by the comics, for the black eye makeup used to make him less recognizable, which has been used in all Batman films following this one, and for the construction of the cowl, which made it impossible for actor Michael Keaton to turn his head while wearing it. The costume was constructed of heavy materials (foam rubber), instead of the thinner material seen in the comics. While Bruce Wayne is depicted as a muscular man in the comics, Keaton was not of the same physical build and the armor was designed to make Batman appear that way. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (461x640, 46 KB) Publicity Shot This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organization to promote their work or product in the media, such as advertising material or a promotional photo in a press kit. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (461x640, 46 KB) Publicity Shot This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organization to promote their work or product in the media, such as advertising material or a promotional photo in a press kit. ... Batman is a 1989 Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. ... Michael John Douglas (born September 5, 1951), better known by the stage name Michael Keaton, is an American actor, perhaps best known for his early comedic roles in films such as Night Shift, Beetlejuice, and his portrayal of Batman in the two Tim Burton directed films of the series. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... Michael John Douglas (born September 5, 1951), better known by the stage name Michael Keaton, is an American actor, perhaps best known for his early comedic roles in films such as Night Shift, Beetlejuice, and his portrayal of Batman in the two Tim Burton directed films of the series. ...


Batman Returns

The Batsuit of Batman Returns, worn by Michael Keaton.

In Batman Returns,[13]Bruce Wayne is seen choosing his Batsuit and accessories out of many spares from a large walk-in closet. The suit used in this film differs slightly from the previous version[14], featuring a more angular shape in the musculature of the armor that is shown to have weak areas (most notable when Catwoman was able to pierce the side of the suit after feeling for weakness in it). It also features a bat-emblem more similar to the DC Comics emblem than the previous film's costume and both the emblem's field and the utility belt are goldenrod instead of plain yellow. In the film, Batman appears wearing a glider which folds out from his cape. For the video game based on the film, see Batman Returns (video game). ... Michael John Douglas (born September 5, 1951), better known by the stage name Michael Keaton, is an American actor, perhaps best known for his early comedic roles in films such as Night Shift, Beetlejuice, and his portrayal of Batman in the two Tim Burton directed films of the series. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Returns (video game). ... This article is about the supervillainess. ...


The costume for Batman Returns was made out of a thinner, slightly more flexible foam rubber material than the costume for the previous film. This is especially noticeable around the mouth area of the cowl.[citation needed]


Batman Forever

The Batsuit of Batman Forever, worn by Val Kilmer.
The Batsuit of Batman Forever, worn by Val Kilmer.

The Batman films of Joel Schumacher are notorious for their addition of rubber nipples to the Batman and Robin costumes (on the DVD commentary, Schumacher claimed they were inspired by statues of the Greek gods). In Batman Forever, the Batsuit is somewhat similar to the previous two films' costumes, except for the focus on a more anatomical design overall and a black utility belt instead of a yellow one. One notable feature of the costume is a button on the utility belt which causes a fireproof coating to excrete from and cover the cape, allowing Batman to wrap it around himself as a shield from extreme fires, and a more 3-D bat emblem on his chest. Also like in Batman Returns, Batman has numerous spares which he keeps in a large dome-like structure in the Batcave of this film.[15][16] Dr. Chase Meridian, the film's love interest for Batman, mentions the appeal of Batman's suit as she runs her fingers across the chest section. After all of the regular Batsuits are destroyed by the Riddler, Batman is forced to use a prototype "Sonar Suit", which is an iridescent silvery-black and more armor-like. This new Batsuit utilizes lenses that slide automatically over the cowl's eyeholes to display a sonar-generated image of Batman's surroundings to him, allowing him to see with more accuracy in extreme darkness or glare. The Batsuits in this film were created from a less dense mixture of foam rubber, which resulted in much lighter suits and allowed more flexibilty for Val Kilmer and the various stunt players, while increasing durability. More than 100 Batman and Robin costumes were created to allow for the range of stunts, from underwater scenes to scenes involving fire and extreme fighting. Image File history File links Batmanforeverdvd. ... Image File history File links Batmanforeverdvd. ... Batman Forever is a 1995 superhero film. ... Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ... Joel Schumacher (born August 29, 1939 in New York, New York, USA) is an American film director, writer, and producer. ... Nipple is, generally, the name given to the mammalian nipple, or to things resembling it, such as the tip of an artificial teat or the tip of a grease secreting mechanism in machinery. ... A listing of Greek mythological beings. ... Batman Forever is a 1995 superhero film. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Returns (video game). ... Dr. Chase Meridian is a fictional character in the 1995 film Batman Forever. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ...


Batman & Robin

The Batsuit of Batman & Robin, worn by George Clooney.

In the second and final Schumacher film, Batman & Robin,[17] Batman produces a credit card from his utility belt which has an expiration date of "Forever". This film also added pop-out ice skates to the costumes' boots. The new Batsuit was also noticeably more blue in tone, and a second, more silvery and elaborately detailed costume (supposedly an Arctic version of the suit) was worn during the film's finale against Mr. Freeze. For the 1949 serial Batman and Robin, see Batman and Robin (serial). ... George Timothy Clooney (born May 6, 1961) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter, who gained fame as one of the lead doctors in the long-running television drama, ER (1994–99), as Anthony Edwardss characters best friend and partner... Batman & Robin, directed by Joel Schumacher, is the fourth installment in the comic book-inspired film series initiated by Tim Burton. ... Mr. ...


Batman Begins

The Batsuit of Batman Begins, worn by Christian Bale.
The Batsuit of Batman Begins, worn by Christian Bale.

The costume in Batman Begins[18] is given the most complete description ever seen in a Batman film and possibly the comic books. The suit is derived from Lucius Fox's Research and Development program, within Wayne Enterprises' Applied Sciences Division. It is described by Fox as a "Nomex survival suit" originally intended for military use, but, with its $300,000 price tag, was considered to be too expensive for the United States Army and military in general. Based on an advanced infantry armor system constructed from Nomex, the first layer of protection is an undersuit with built-in temperature regulators designed to keep the wearer at a comfortable temperature in almost any condition. The second layer of protection consists of armor built over the chest, calves, thighs, arms, and back. This armor features a kevlar bi-weave that can stop slashing weapons and can also deflect any bullet short of a straight shot impact, and reinforced joints that allow maximum flexibility and mobility. The armor was then coated with a black latex material to dampen Bruce's heat signature, making him difficult to detect with night-vision equipment. Made of a graphite material, the cowl acts as a protective helmet. The cowl's Kevlar lining is supposed to be bulletproof. A manufacturing problem with the first shipment of the cowl made its outer shell incapable of withstanding blunt trauma (a flaw Alfred demonstrates to Bruce Wayne using a baseball bat). Batman apparently takes on Falcone and his henchmen at the docks with the defective helmet. The second shipment was supposed to fix this problem. An advanced eavesdropping device is concealed within the cowl's right ear and enables Batman to listen in on conversations from a distance. Image File history File links Batman_bale_small. ... Image File history File links Batman_bale_small. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Begins (video game). ... Christian Charles Philip Bale (also known professionally as Christian Morgan Bale; born 30 January 1974) is a Screen Actors Guild Award-nominated, Saturn Award-winning Welsh actor[2][3] whose film credits include Empire of the Sun, American Psycho, Equilibrium, The Machinist, Batman Begins and the upcoming The Dark Knight. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Begins (video game). ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... NOMEX® is the brand name of a flame retardant meta-aramid material marketed and first discovered by DuPont in the 1970s. ... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... NOMEX® is the brand name of a flame retardant meta-aramid material marketed and first discovered by DuPont in the 1970s. ... Kevlars molecular structure; BOLD: monomer unit; DASHED: hydrogen bonds. ... A Roman Catholic monk wearing a cowl The cowl (from the Latin, cuculla) is a long, outer garment, with wide sleeves, worn by Catholic monks when participating in the liturgy. ... Four historically significant baseball bats showcased in the National Baseball Hall of Fames traveling exhibit Baseball As America. ...


The utility belt is a modified climbing harness, with magnetized impact-resistant pouches and canisters attached to the belt at ergonomic points for ease of reach. It carries a magnetic gas-powered grapple gun, an encrypted cell phone, Batarangs, a medical kit, smoke bombs, mini explosives, periscope, remote control for the Batmobile (the Tumbler), mini-cam, money, and other unspecified equipment. Batman removed the belt's shoulder and chest straps because they constricted his movements. Batman's cape is made of "memory cloth," also developed by Lucius Fox. It is essentially flexible in its normal state, but becomes semi-rigid in a fixed form (Batman's wings in the movie) when an electric current is passed through it from the microcircuits in his right glove. Bruce also adds metal gauntlets with scallops on the forearms, an innovation derived from his experience as a pupil of Ra's al Ghul's organization, the League of Shadows. Mainly used to block against knives or other stabbing weapons, Bruce managed to surprise Ra's by breaking the blade of his ninjaken in multiple places with the gauntlets. Batman surrounded by batarangs. ... For other uses, see Camera (disambiguation). ... Ras al Ghul, sometimes written Rās al GhÅ«l (Arabic: رأس الغول), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Ras al Ghul (sometimes written Rās al Ghūl) is a DC Comics supervillain, an archnemesis of Batman. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ninjatō . (Discuss) A Ninjaken The Ninjaken ), also called shinobigatana ), or ninjato, is the sword a ninja may have carried. ...


The left boot heel contains a high frequency sonic "sounder" which can summon bats. When used at a lower frequency the sound can cause people to have incapacitating headaches.


Actor Christian Bale said of the Batsuit while filming Batman Begins: "It's hot, dark, and sweaty and it gives me a headache." This line was so popular that the costumers on the film had it printed on their t-shirts.[19] Christian Charles Philip Bale (also known professionally as Christian Morgan Bale; born 30 January 1974) is a Screen Actors Guild Award-nominated, Saturn Award-winning Welsh actor[2][3] whose film credits include Empire of the Sun, American Psycho, Equilibrium, The Machinist, Batman Begins and the upcoming The Dark Knight. ...


The Dark Knight

The Batsuit of The Dark Knight, worn by Christian Bale.

The Batsuit will change in the next film The Dark Knight. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1399 × 2100 pixel, file size: 158 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Batman is the fucking best superhero ever!p. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1399 × 2100 pixel, file size: 158 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Batman is the fucking best superhero ever!p. ... The Dark Knight is an upcoming 2008 American superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Batman. ... The Dark Knight is an upcoming 2008 American superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Batman. ...


In this new design, the bodysuit is now broken into multiple pieces of armor over a more flexible bodysuit, for greater mobility. The cowl of the Batsuit, which in previous film incarnations has been attached to the shoulder and neck, is now a separate component inspired by the design of motorcycle helmets, allowing the wearer to freely swivel and move his neck without moving the rest of his upper torso as was characteristic in previous cinematic versions of the Batsuit.[20] The blades on the sides of the gauntlets are now retractable. A commercial released in May 2008 confirmed a costume designer's prior vague description of them shooting out at people, showing that they are also ranged weapons.[21] The bat emblem is smaller than the one in Batman Begins and it's more similar to the Batman logo used in the posters. There is an ongoing rumor that the new batsuit will contain sliding white lenses in his mask, to enhance his unearthly appearance and to explain the comic books' original white eyes. It is also rumored that the lenses are used as a radar screen, and are not continuously on. [22] In the trailer, Batman is seen looking across Gotham in a fashion that supports the rumor that the lenses will be used as a radar screen in the film.


References

  1. ^ Batman Annual #15 (1991)
  2. ^ Robin #14
  3. ^ Batman: Hush comic book storyline
  4. ^ Superman/Batman: Public Enemies comic book storyline
  5. ^ Superman/Batman #9
  6. ^ Batman: Hush comic book storyline
  7. ^ Batman: Detective Comics #741
  8. ^ Batman #647
  9. ^ Nolan, Christopher. Batman Begins. Warner Brothers, 2004
  10. ^ Miller, Frank. Batman #406. "Batman: Year One", DC Comics, 1987; and Batman vs. Predator #3 (1992)
  11. ^ Batman (1989 film)
  12. ^ Grappling Gun: In comic books, the Dark Knight doesn't carry a gun that shoots bullets. In the film, he is armed, however, with this weapon, the Grappling Gun: a spring action, speargun-like device that shots a grappling hook and, when needed, paralyzing gas.
  13. ^ Batman Returns
  14. ^ The new batsuit for Batman Returns
  15. ^ The new Bat-Suits for Batman Forever
  16. ^ Batman Forever
  17. ^ Batman & Robin
  18. ^ Batman Begins
  19. ^ Christian Bale speaks from set of Batman Begins
  20. ^ Entertainment Weekly #940
  21. ^ Entertainment Weekly #940
  22. ^ Joker Begins? White Lenses? What's up with 'The Dark Knight'? - Story @ Comics2Film.com
Published 2002-2003 in monthly installments in Batman issues 608-619 by DC Comics Characters Batman (Bruce Wayne), Catwoman (Selina Kyle), Superman (Clark Kent), Nightwing (Dick Grayson), Robin (Tim Drake), The Joker, The Riddler, Hush, Scarecrow, Huntress, Ras al Ghul, Lex Luthor, Two-Face, Commissioner James Gordon, Oracle, Harley... Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ... Published 2002-2003 in monthly installments in Batman issues 608-619 by DC Comics Characters Batman (Bruce Wayne), Catwoman (Selina Kyle), Superman (Clark Kent), Nightwing (Dick Grayson), Robin (Tim Drake), The Joker, The Riddler, Hush, Scarecrow, Huntress, Ras al Ghul, Lex Luthor, Two-Face, Commissioner James Gordon, Oracle, Harley... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Begins (video game). ... Batman: Year One was the title of a comic book written by Frank Miller, illustrated by David Mazzuchelli and colored/painted by Richmond Lewis, released in 1988 by DC Comics. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Azrael (Jean-Paul Valley) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... Nightwing is a name used by at least six fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe. ... Jason Peter Todd is a fictional character published in stories by DC Comics. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... A classic image of Batman and Robin reinterpreted by painter Alex Ross. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... Bette Kane is a fictional character in DC comics. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... Cassandra Cain is a fictional character in the DC Universe, and the most recent Batgirl. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... The Huntress is a superheroine from DC Comics. ... Man-Bat (real name Dr. Kirk Langström) is a fictional character in DC Comics universe who first appeared in Detective Comics #400, illustrated by Neal Adams. ... Bat-Mite, astride Ace the Bat-Hound, on the cover of Batman #133 (August 1960). ... The comic book character Ace the Bat-Hound was the canine crime-fighting partner of Batman and Robin in DC Comics of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... James Jim Worthington Gordon is a supporting character in DC Comics Batman series. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Renee Montoya is a fictional character in DC Comics. ... Vicki Vale is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a reporter who was the most prominent and longest lasting love interest of Bruce Wayne and his alter-ego, Batman. ... Talia al Ghul is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, the now-estranged daughter of the supervillain Ras al Ghul, and a love interest of Batman. ... The Joker is a fictional character and supervillain that appears in the comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an enemy of Batman. ... Binomial name Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kuntze Poison-ivy (Toxicodendron radicans or Rhus toxicodendron), in the family Anacardiaceae, is a woody vine that is well-known for its ability to produce urushiol, a skin irritant which for most people will cause an agonizing, itching rash. ... Ras al Ghul, sometimes written Rās al GhÅ«l (Arabic: رأس الغول), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... This article deals with the Scarecrow of DC Comics. ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... The Batcave. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Wayne Manor in 1989s Batman. ... Blüdhaven is a fictional city in the DC Universe. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Batman surrounded by batarangs. ... Famous version of the Emblem used to promote the 1989 film starring Michael Keaton. ... Batmans utility belt is the most characteristic portion of Batmans costume, much like Wonder Womans Lasso of Truth, or Green Lanterns power ring. ... The Bat-Signal in Jim Lees cover art from Batman #608. ... The Batboat from Batman: The Movie[1]. The Batboat is the fictional personal boat of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batcopter from Batman: The Movie. ... The Batcycle from Batman: The Movie. ... The Batmobile as seen in the 2005 movie Batman Begins. The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batplane (or Batwing) is the fictional aircraft for the comic book superhero Batman. ... Batman #1 Spring 1940 Art by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Batman is an ongoing comic book series featuring the DC Comics action hero of the same name. ... This is a list of the alternate versions of Batman from all media, including DC Comics multiverse, Elseworlds, television and film. ... Robin is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the various depictions of the fictional character Batman, the DC Comics superhero. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Robin as he appears in other media, such as films, television and radio. ... This article is about the 1960s television series. ... Adam West (born William West Anderson on September 19, 1928) is an American actor who is best known for playing the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne on the 1960s TV series Batman (which also had a film adaptation). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Burt Ward (born Bert John Gervis, Jr. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... Alan Napier as Alfred Pennyworth from Batman. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ... Neil Hamilton (9 September 1899–24 September 1984) was an American actor famous for his role as Commissioner Gordon on the Batman TV series of the 1960s. ... James Jim Worthington Gordon is a supporting character in DC Comics Batman series. ... Madge Blake (born 31 May 1899 in Kinsley, Kansas; died 19 February 1969 in Pasadena, California) was an American character actress most famous for her role as Aunt Harriet Cooper on the Batman TV series of the 1960s. ... Harriet Cooper, best known simply as Aunt Harriet from the Batman television series, is a fictional character that first appeared in the comic book Detective Comics #328 (June 1964). ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... Cesar Julio Romero, Jr. ... The Joker is a fictional character and supervillain that appears in the comic books published by DC Comics. ... Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1907[1] – September 9, 1997) was a versatile two-time Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an enemy of Batman. ... Julie Newmar (born Julie Chalene Newmeyer on August 16, 1933) is an American actress, dancer and singer. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... Lee Ann Meriwether (born May 27, 1935 in Los Angeles, California) is Miss America 1955, and an American actress, appearing in movies, soap operas, game shows and television. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... Eartha Kitt (born Eartha Mae Keith on January 17, 1927),[1] is an American actress, singer, and cabaret star. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... Frank Gorshin as the Riddler, from the Batman TV series. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... John Allen Astin (born March 30, 1930) is an Oscar nominated American actor who has appeared in numerous films and television shows, but is best known for the role of Gomez Addams on The Addams Family television series and similarly eccentric comedic characters. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... This article is about the actor. ... Mr. ... Otto Ludwig Preminger (December 5, 1906 – April 23, 1986) was a film director. ... Mr. ... Eli Herschel Wallach (born December 7, 1915) is an American film, TV and stage actor. ... Mr. ... Maurice Evans (born June 3, 1901 in Dorset; died March 12, 1989 in East Sussex) was a British-born actor who became a US citizen in 1941. ... The Puzzler is a fictional supervillain from the DC comics universe. ... Actor Walter Slezak in Born to Kill (1947) Walter Slezak (May 3, 1902 - April 21, 1983) was an Austrian actor and son of famed opera star (Leo Slezak). ... Clock King is a fictional supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... David Wayne (January 30, 1914 - February 9, 1995) was a Tony Award-winning American actor with a career spanning nearly half a century. ... The Mad Hatter is a fictional character in the Batman comics, published by DC Comics. ... Van (Van Zandt) Williams is an American actor (born February 22, 1934, in Fort Worth, Texas) best known for his brief yet world famous television role as Britt Reid aka Green Hornet with the late Bruce Lee as his sidekick Kato, in the 1966-1967 ABC The Green Hornet television... The Green Hornet is a fictional character, a masked crime fighter. ... Bruce Lee (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ XiÇŽolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Chinese-American martial artist, philosopher, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as the most influential martial artist of the 20th century and a... The Green Hornet with Kato below the title character. ... Vincent Price as Egghead Egghead was a villain created for the campy 1960s Batman television series. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... King Tut was a villain created for the 1960s television series Batman. ... Victor Buono Victor Buono (February 3, 1938 - January 1, 1982) was an American actor. ... Stafford Alois Repp (26 April 1918 - 5 November 1974) was a character actor best known for his role as Chief OHara on the Batman TV series. ... Harve Bennett (born August 17, 1930) is an American television and film producer and scriptwriter, perhaps best known for being the producer on the second through to fifth Star Trek films. ... Edgar J. Scherick (October 24, 1924 – December 2, 2002) was one of the most prolific producers of television miniseries, made-for-television films, and theatrical motion pictures. ... William Dozier (13 February 1908 – 23 April 1991) was a television producer and actor, most famous as the producer and narrator of the Batman television series. ... Eric Clifford Ambler OBE (28 June 1909 - 22 October 1998) was an influential English writer of spy novels who introduced a new realism to the genre. ... Lorenzo Semple Jr. ... Stanley Ralph Ross (July 22, 1937, New York City – March 16, 2000) started his career in advertising, however soon went to work as a writer and actor on various television shows, most notably cult-classics such as the 1960s Batman series starring Adam West and also The Monkees. ... Charles Hoffman (September 28, 1911 - April 8, 1972) was a film and television writer and film producer. ... Leslie H. Martinson( January 16, 1915 - ) was director of moderately successful if not best known theater and television movies, including Batman, Gary Colemans Kid with the Broken Halo, PT-109, and Rescue From Gilligans Island. ... Nelson Smock Riddle, Jr. ... Neal Hefti (born October 29, 1922 in Hastings, Nebraska) is an American jazz trumpeter, composer, tune writer, and arranger. ... Harry W. Gerstad (June 11, 1909 - July 17, 2002) was a film editor that sometimes directed films. ... Charles B. Fitzsimons (May 8, 1924 in Ranelagh, County Dublin, Ireland - February 14, 2001 in Los Angeles, California from liver failure) was an Irish actor before emigrating to the USA. He became a Hollywood film actor and later a supervising production executive before becoming a producer himself. ... Born in New Haven, Conn. ... Jack Martin Smith (1911 - 1993) was a highly successful Hollywood art director with over 130 films to his credit and nine Academy Award nominations which ultimately yielded three Oscars. ... Walter M. Scott (7 November 1906 – 2 February 1989) was an Academy Award winning set decorator who worked on movies such as The Sound of Music and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. ... Benjamin Emmet Nye, Sr. ... William E. May, better known as Billy May (10 November 1916 – 22 January 2004) was an American composer, arranger and musician. ... Lenwood Ballard Bill Abbott, also known as L.B.Abbott (13 June 1908, Pasadena, California - 28 September 1985, Los Angeles) was a special effects expert, cinematographer and cameraman. ... George Barris is one of the best-known designers of custom cars in the world. ... The Batboat from Batman: The Movie[1]. The Batboat is the fictional personal boat of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batcopter from Batman: The Movie. ... The Batcycle from Batman: The Movie. ... Batmans current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. ... The Batcomputer, the computer system used by comic book superhero Batman and housed in his underground headquarters, the Batcave. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... The Batcave. ... Wayne Manor in 1989s Batman. ... One possible map of Gotham. ... For the 1989 version starring Michael Keaton, see Batman (1989 film). ... Barbara Joyce as the Huntress from Legends of the Superheroes. ... The New Adventures of Batman is an animated series produced by Filmation in 1977 featuring the DC Comics superheroes Batman and Robin, and occasionally Batgirl. ... The Green Hornet is a fictional character, a masked crime fighter. ... This article is about the various depictions of the fictional character Batman, the DC Comics superhero. ... The Batman supervillain Joker has made several appearances in media other than DC Comics. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Robin as he appears in other media, such as films, television and radio. ... Actress Dina Meyer portrays Barbara Gordon in the television series Birds of Prey This article focuses on the adaptations of fictional superheroine Barbara Gordon into popular media. ... Batman prepares to do the Batusi Batusi was a 1960s style go-go dance invented and performed by Batman. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... A deathtrap is a literary and dramatic plot device in which a villain, who has captured the hero or another sympathetic character, attempts to use an elaborate and usually sadistic method of murdering him/her. ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... Batman is a 1989 Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Returns (video game). ... Batman Forever is a 1995 superhero film. ... For the 1949 serial Batman and Robin, see Batman and Robin (serial). ... List indicator(s) (x) indicates the actor portrayed a character that did not originate in the comic book. ... Michael John Douglas (born September 5, 1951), better known by the stage name Michael Keaton, is an American actor, perhaps best known for his early comedic roles in films such as Night Shift, Beetlejuice, and his portrayal of Batman in the two Tim Burton directed films of the series. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English actor Michael Gough. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ... Pat Hingle (born July 19, 1924) is an American actor. ... James Jim Worthington Gordon is a supporting character in DC Comics Batman series. ... John Joseph Nicholson (born April 22, 1937), known as Jack Nicholson, is a three time Academy Award-winning American actor internationally renowned for his often dark-themed portrayals of neurotic characters. ... The Joker is a fictional character and supervillain that appears in the comic books published by DC Comics. ... Kimila Ann Basinger (born December 8, 1953) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... Vicki Vale is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a reporter who was the most prominent and longest lasting love interest of Bruce Wayne and his alter-ego, Batman. ... Billy Dee Williams (born April 6, 1937) is an American actor who for a period in the 1970s rivaled Sidney Poitier as the most popular black actor in American film. ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... Daniel Michael DeVito Jr. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an enemy of Batman. ... Michelle Marie Pfeiffer (born April 29, 1958) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning, BAFTA-winning American actress. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Tommy Lee Jones (born September 15, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actor and director. ... Two-Face, from Batman #234, August 1971. ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Christopher Chris Eugene ODonnell (born June 26, 1970) is a Golden Globe Award-nominated American actor, perhaps best known for playing Robin in the Batman films, Batman Forever and Batman & Robin. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... George Timothy Clooney (born May 6, 1961) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter, who gained fame as one of the lead doctors in the long-running television drama, ER (1994–99), as Anthony Edwardss characters best friend and partner... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Mr. ... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ... Alicia Silverstone, (born October 4, 1976) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... Robert Alexander Swenson Jr. ... Bane is a fictional character, associated with DC Comics Batman. ... Elle Macpherson (born 29 March 1964) is an Australian businesswoman, supermodel and actress. ... Julie Madison is a DC Comics fictional character who appeared in early issues of Detective Comics featuring Batman. ... John Soursby Glover, Jr. ... The Floronic Man is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Vendela Kirsebom Vendela Maria Kirsebom (1967-) is a Swedish-born supermodel. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Boss Carl Grissom was the most powerful crime lord in Gotham City in the 1989 Tim Burton Batman film. ... Jack Palance (February 18, 1919 - November 10, 2006) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Lt. ... William Michael Hootkins (July 5, 1948 – October 23, 2005) was an American actor who played Red Six (Jek Porkins) in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977) and as the crooked Lt. ... Christopher Walken as Max Shreck in 1992s Batman Returns. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... Dr. Chase Meridian is a fictional character played by Nicole Kidman and appears in the 1995 film Batman Forever. ... Nicole Mary Kidman, Order of Australia (born 20 June 1967 in Honolulu) is an Academy Award-winning Australian/American[1] actress. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Howard Peter Guber (b. ... Jon Pagano Peters (born on 2 June 1945 in Van Nuys, California to Jack Peters and Helen Pagano) is a former hairdresser turned movie producer. ... Michael Uslan is the originator of the Batman movies and was the first professor to teach Comic Book Folklore at an accredited university. ... Sam Hamm is an American screenwriter, perhaps best known for writing the screenplays for the Tim Burton Batman films. ... Charles McKeown (b. ... Warren Skaaren (born March 9, 1946 in Rochester, Minnesota, USA-died December 28, 1990 in Austin, Texas, USA from cancer) was an American screenwriter and film producer. ... Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American musician who led the rock band Oingo Boingo as singer / songwriter from 1976 until its breakup in 1995, and has composed film scores extensively since 1985s Pee-wees Big Adventure. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ray Lovejoy was a film editor with over thirty years of experience in that field. ... Anton Furst is a distinguished production designer who won an Oscar for designing the Batmobile and the noirish nightmare version of Gotham City in Tim Burtons Batman (1989). ... Derek Meddings (15 January 1931–10 September 1995) was a British television and cinema special effects expert, initially noted for his work on the Supermarionation television puppet series produced by Gerry Anderson. ... Keith Short (born March 8, 1941) is a sculptor for the feature film industry. ... Denise Di Novi is an American film producer. ... Daniel Waters is an American screenwriter. ... Wesley Strick is an American screenwriter. ... Christopher John Lebenzon (29 October 1953, Redwood City, California) is an Academy Award-nominated American film editor. ... Bo Welch (born November 30, 1951) is a former motion picture production designer turned director. ... Stan Winston (born April 7, 1946, in Richmond, Virginia), is an Academy Award winning special effects and makeup artist, and film director. ... Boss Film Studios was founded by visual effects veteran Richard Edlund after his departure from Industrial Light and Magic, producing visual effects for over thirty films from 1983 to 1997. ... Jim Rygiel at Pop!Tech 2004 Jim Rygiel was the visual effects supervisor on “The Lord of the Rings” movie trilogy. ... Pacific Data Images was a computer animation production company that was bought by DreamWorks SKG. It is now known as PDI/DreamWorks and is half of DreamWorks Animation SKG, Inc. ... Kathy Long (born 21 April 1964) is an American kickboxer and five time world kickboxing champion. ... Anthony Charles De Longis, born March 23, 1950, in Glendale, California, United States, is an American actor, stuntman, and choreographer. ... Joel Schumacher (born August 29, 1939 in New York, New York, USA) is an American film director, writer, and producer. ... Akiva Goldsman (born July 7, 1962) is an American screenwriter, producer, and occasional actor in the motion picture industry. ... Elliot Goldenthal, born on May 2, 1954, in Brooklyn, New York City, is an American composer of contemporary music and has written works for concert hall, theater, dance and film. ... John Charles Dykstra (born June 3, 1947 in Long Beach, California, United States) is a special effects supervisor and pioneer in the development of the use of computers in film making. ... Stephen Goldblatt is an Oscar nominated cinematographer. ... Dennis Virkler is an Academy Award nominated film editor. ... Richard A. Rick Baker (born December 8, 1950 in Binghamton, New York, USA) is a Hollywood special makeup effects artist known for his realistic creature effects. ... Will Shortz (b. ... Mitchell (Mitch) Jay Gaylord (born March 10, 1961) is an American gymnast and Olympic Gold Medalist. ... For others of the same name, see Alan Grant. ... EFilm is wholly owned by Deluxe Laboratories. ... BUF Compagnie is a French/American digital visual effects company, specializing in CGI for feature films, commercials, and music videos. ... This page has been deleted, and protected to prevent re-creation. ... Rainmaker Digital Effects, more commonly just Rainmaker is a special effects studio located in Vancouver. ... Rhythm & Hues Studios is an Academy Award winning visual effects studio, founded in 1987 by six former employees of Robert Abel and Associates. ... Prince (UK) singles chronology Partyman (1989) The Arms of Orion (1989) Thieves in the Temple (1990) The Arms of Orion is a slow, romantic duet by Prince and Sheena Easton from the 1989 Batman soundtrack. ... Batdance is a song by Prince, from the 1989 Batman soundtrack (see 1989 in music). ... Despite the overwhelming negative publicity the film received, its soundtrack became very popular and was well received. ... While it garnered mixed reviews from critics, the 1989 Batman soundtrack returned Prince to the top of the Billboard album charts. ... Elliot Goldenthal scored the third Batman movie Batman Forever in 1995, it is one of his most dramatic and playfull soundtracks with big brass, insane strings and the kind of fairground noises you hear clowns making with their toys; yet there is still that ominous, sweeping, anthemic sound that Goldenthal... Elliot Goldenthal scored the third Batman movie Batman Forever in 1995, it is one of his most dramatic and playfull soundtracks with big brass, insane strings and the kind of fairground noises you hear clowns making with their toys; yet there is still that ominous, sweeping, anthemic sound that Goldenthal... The End Is the Beginning Is the End (or TEITBITE among fans) is a song by The Smashing Pumpkins. ... Siouxsie Sioux singles chronology Fear (of the Unknown) Siouxsie & the Banshees (1991) Face to Face (1992) Interlude Morrissey & Siouxsie (1994) Face to Face is a song recorded by English rock band Siouxsie & the Banshees. ... Single Information Foolish Games was Jewel’s third/fourth and final single taken from her debut album. ... Prince (DEU) singles chronology Scandalous (1989) The Future (1990) Thieves in the Temple (1990) The Future is a song from Princes 1989 Batman soundtrack, and the final single released from the album. ... Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me was a song by U2 released on the Batman Forever soundtrack album. ... The Hunter Gets Captured by the Game is a 1967 single by Motown Records girl group The Marvelettes, from their self-titled album of the same year. ... 1995 re-release Kiss from a Rose is a song from Seals second eponymous album Seal, subsequently featured on the Batman Forever (1995) film soundtrack. ... Look into My Eyes is a song by Bone Thugs-N-Harmony from the album The Art of War. ... Partyman is Princes 1989 followup to the No. ... The Passenger is a song by proto-punk artist Iggy Pop. ... Prince (DEU) singles chronology The Arms of Orion (1989) Scandalous (1989) The Future (1990) Scandalous is a smooth, romantic ballad by Prince, released as a single off his 1989 Batman soundtrack. ... Smash It Up (Part I & II) is a song released by the British punk rock band The Damned. ... Super Freak is a 1981 hit single, produced and performed by Rick James for the Motown label. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Batman is a horizontally scrolling beat em up and Run and gun arcade game released by Atari Games in 1991, produced by Numega. ... Batman is a Data East pinball machine released in August 1991. ... Batman can mean two different video games inspired on the eponymous superhero from DC Comics. ... Batman Returns is a video game for various platforms based on the movie of the same name. ... For the arcade, PlayStation, PC and Sega Saturn game, see Batman Forever: The Arcade Game Batman Forever is a beat em up game based on the movie of the same name. ... Batman & Robin is a video game based on the 1997 film of the same name. ... The Batmobile as seen in the 2005 movie Batman Begins. The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ... As the 1990s Batman films were handed over to director Joel Schumacher from Tim Burton, the design for the Batmobile became increasingly fanciful, as decorative lighting was added to the vehicles rims, sides and front edge, and the wing-shaped fins reached further into the air. ... Batman surrounded by batarangs. ... The Batboat from Batman: The Movie[1]. The Batboat is the fictional personal boat of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batboat from Batman: The Movie[1]. The Batboat is the fictional personal boat of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batboat from Batman: The Movie[1]. The Batboat is the fictional personal boat of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batplane (or Batwing) is the fictional aircraft for the comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batplane (or Batwing) is the fictional aircraft for the comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batplane (or Batwing) is the fictional aircraft for the comic book superhero Batman. ... Batmans current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. ... Batmans current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. ... Batmans current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. ... Batmans current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. ... Batmans utility belt is the most characteristic portion of Batmans costume, much like Wonder Womans Lasso of Truth, or Green Lanterns power ring. ... The Batcycle from Batman: The Movie. ... The Joker with a victim of Joker venom, in the OverPower card game Joker venom is a fictional toxin, a favourite murder weapon utilised by The Joker in the Batman franchise of movies, comics, and cartoons. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... The Batcave. ... The Batcave. ... The Batcave. ... The Batcave. ... The Batcave. ... Wayne Manor in 1989s Batman. ... Knebworth House is a country house near Stevenage in Hertfordshire, England. ... The great hall Hatfield House is a country house set in a large park, the Great Park, on the eastern side of the town of Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England. ... The Webb Institute is a specialized private college in Glen Cove, New York that has only one program, which is undergraduate. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... Axis Chemicals is a fictional chemical plant in the first Batman film and in DC Comics. ... The gatehouse at Pinewood Studios Pinewood Studios is a major British film studio situated in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire. ... Batman Adventure: The Ride is a Batman-themed attraction at the Warner Bros. ... Mind Bender is a steel roller coaster located at Six Flags Over Georgia near Atlanta, Georgia. ... Mr. ... Mr. ... This article is about the various depictions of the fictional character Batman, the DC Comics superhero. ... The Batman supervillain Joker has made several appearances in media other than DC Comics. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Robin as he appears in other media, such as films, television and radio. ... Actress Dina Meyer portrays Barbara Gordon in the television series Birds of Prey This article focuses on the adaptations of fictional superheroine Barbara Gordon into popular media. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

 
 

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