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Encyclopedia > Batplane

The Batplane (or Batwing) is the fictional aircraft for the comic book superhero Batman. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... “Flying Machine” redirects here. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... For the upcoming parody of superhero films, see Superhero!. Batman and Superman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...

Contents

History of the Batplane

The first Batplane, 1939

The Bat-gyro. (Detective Comics No. 31)

Batman made his very first appearance in Detective Comics No. 27 (May 1939). Only four issues later, in Detective Comics No. 31 (September 1939), his first vehicle was introduced. It wasn't the Batmobile. The distinctive automobile would not make its first appearance until nearly two years later. Batman's first identifiable vehicle was a bat-shaped autogyro, as seen in the picture at right. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ... Modern Autogyro, ELA-07, Casarrubios del Monte Airfield, Spain, 2004. ...

The first use of the name, “Bat-plane.” (Detective Comics No. 31)

Batman referred to his craft as the "Batgyro" in the first panel in which it appeared, but that was the last time it would be called that. In the very next panel that featured the bat-shaped craft, it was described as the "Bat-plane", the name that would be used for its entire sixty-year career. And it was already doing things impossible to ordinary aircraft. Despite their similar appearance to helicopters, autogyros cannot actually hover in one spot. Their rotors are un-powered so they rely on the forward motion of the craft to turn the rotors and generate lift. But technical details like that never hindered the operation of Batman's vehicles and weapons. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more large horizontal rotors (propellers). ...


The autogyro Batplane only lasted for a few issues, but it did fight an exciting air battle against the "Dirigible of Doom" (in Detective Comics No. 33, November 1939) before disappearing from the pages of Batman's stories. Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...




The Batplane evolves, the 1940s

The Batplane of the 1940s with a wide cabin and windows typical of a small, civilian aircraft. (Batman No. 9)

The Batplane quickly evolved into an aircraft that was, outwardly, similar in design to the private airplanes of the day. It was a low wing monoplane with a tractor prop and fixed landing gear. The picture at right is from Batman No. 9, Feb-Mar 1942. Note that by 1942, retractable landing gear was common on both military aircraft and larger civil aircraft, but fixed gear was still the norm for single-engine private planes. Also note that there is no sign of a propeller. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

This panel shows a Batplane with a sliding canopy as might be found on a military fighter plane. (Batman No. 12)

One of the most distinctive features of the Batplane of the 1940s was the large "bat-mask" that covered its nose. This was not a particularly aerodynamic feature, but it wasn't that different from the blunt noses of the radial-engined ships of the day. Initially, the Batplane had a propeller plainly visible, attached to the front of the bat-mask. Examples of the Batplane with a visible propeller can be found in Detective Comics No.s 54, 61 and 64. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


But, at some point, the propeller disappeared. In Batman No. 9 there is no sign of the spinning propeller that was visible in the examples given above. The propeller-less Batplane became the standard depiction until a jet-powered aircraft replaced it. What propelled the Batplane through the air for most of the decade of the 1940s remains a mystery.


Although the Batplane was drawn with fair consistency throughout the 1940s, variations did appear from time to time (almost certainly a result of different artists working on the books). The two panels presented here show the most common variations. The right panel shows a Batplane with a wide cabin and windows typical of a small, civilian aircraft. The left panel shows a Batplane with a sliding canopy as might be found on a military fighter plane.




The first jet-propelled Batplane, 1946

Batman and Robin add “jet-tubes: to the Batplane. (Detective Comics No. 108)

Jet aircraft made their appearance during World War II with the British Gloster Meteor and the German Messerschmitt Me 262 the most prominent examples. After the war, it was clear that jets were the future of military aircraft, at least. The creative team at DC made an early attempt to update the Batplane to the jet age in Detective Comics No. 108 (February 1946) by having Batman and Robin retrofit it with two jet engines slung under the wings. Although the slender tubes they are shown attaching to the Batplane look more like the pulse jets used on the German V-1 flying bomb than they do the bulky jet engines of the period, it was a step in the right direction. It appears there was little follow through, however, and this version of a jet-powered Batplane was not featured again. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jet aircraft are aircrafts with jet engines. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Gloster Meteor was the Allies first operational jet fighter. ... The Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe (German: Swallow) was the worlds first operational turbojet fighter aircraft. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A pulse jet engine (or pulsejet) is a very simple form of internal combustion engine wherein the combustion occurs in pulses and the propulsive effort is a jet; a reaction to the rearward flow of hot gases. ... The V-1 (German: Vergeltungswaffe 1) was the first guided missile used in war and the forerunner of todays cruise missile. ...




Batplane II, 1950

The origin of Batplane II. (Batman No. 61)

A more permanent change was made in Batman No. 61 (Oct-Nov 1950). [1][2] When the old Batplane was lost in an accident, Batman and Robin undertook the construction of a brand new, sleek, jet aircraft dubbed the "Batplane II." The story includes panels that show the new Batplane being built from scratch right in the Batcave. Batplane II was equipped with an amazing array of gadgets and secret weapons, including the ability to convert to a submarine. Its overall design was typical of many early jet fighters, though it was larger than most fighters of the 1950s. It had slightly swept wings and a long, graceful fuselage. It was a good design and would, with minor variations, continue to be used through the 1950s and most of the 1960s. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Batcave. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ...




Batplane III, 1964

A Batplane based on the F-104. (Batman No. 167)

By 1964, the sales of Batman comics had fallen drastically and DC considered canceling the title. But editor Julius Schwartz, who had produced hits by modernizing and updating old characters like the Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman and the Atom, was given the task of doing the same with Batman. Detective Comics No. 327 (May 1964) announced a "New Look" for DC's second oldest superhero. Gone were the aliens and science fiction themed stories, as were most of the large supporting cast of characters like Batwoman and Bat-Mite. The "New Look" returned Batman to his detective roots and focused stories on crime and mysteries. The Batmobile was revamped into a sports car and Batman's costume was refreshed with a yellow oval behind the bat symbol. Because of the move away from adventure stories, the Batplane was not used nearly as much as it had been before the editorial revamp. It did not appear again until November 1964 in Batman No. 167. But when it did, it had a new look, too. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 – February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Bat-Mite, astride Ace the Bat-Hound, on the cover of Batman #133 (August 1960). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...


For the first time, a Batplane was clearly based on an actual aircraft. The new Batplane in Batman No. 167 was a Lockheed F-104 Starfighter with minor modifications (scalloped trailing edges on the wings and tail, as on all previous Batplanes). Unfortunately, the F-104 style Batplane only appeared in that one issue. The Batplane continued to be little used for the rest of the 1960s. It made a few more appearances in Batman and Detective Comics but those reverted to the classic design of the Batplane II, with the only indication of the "New Look" being the addition of a yellow oval Bat-emblem. The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter is a single-engine, high-performance, supersonic interceptor aircraft that served with the United States Air Force (USAF) from 1958 until 1967 and continued in service with the Air National Guard until it was phased out in 1975. ...




Batplane IV, 1968

A Batplane based on the F-101. (Batman No. 203)

Four years after the appearance of the F-104 based Batplane, another design appeared that was also clearly derived from a USAF jet fighter. Batman No. 203 (July 1968) was an "80-Page Giant" that featured The Secrets of the Batcave. Inside, a two-page spread presented a cut-away drawing of the Batcave. Part of that diagram showed the hangars for the Batplane and Batcopter located in a mountaintop behind Wayne Manor. The Batplane seen in the hangar was a new design, the inspiration for which was readily apparent to anyone familiar with the McDonnell F-101 Voodoo. As it turned out, the Voodoo-based Batplane's only appearance in the comics was in the "behind-the-scenes" diagrams in Batman #203. It never actually made it into a story. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The McDonnell F-101 Voodoo was a supersonic military aircraft flown by the USAF and the RCAF. Initially designed as a long-range bomber escort (known as a penetration fighter) for the Strategic Air Command, the Voodoo served in a variety of other roles, including the fighter bomber, all-weather...




Batplane V, 1971

A Batplane based on the F-4. (Batman No. 231)

The decade of the 1970s was slim pickings for Batplane sightings. The Batplane made only two appearances in the entire decade. The first was in Batman No. 231 (May 1971). That issue provided three large panels of well illustrated art that made the identification of the Batplane as a McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II unmistakable. The Phantom was still a top-line fighter for both the US Navy and Air Force in 1971 so it's use as a Batplane was very reasonable. The Batplane V appeared to be an unmodified, early model Phantom with only a paint job to distinguish it as the Dark Knight's ride. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... “F-4” redirects here. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


The only other appearance of the Batplane in the 1970s was in Batman 305 (November 1978). Unfortunately, in this issue the Batplane is drawn very small so identification is difficult. It appears to be another generic design similar to the Batplane II. Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...


The decade of the 1980s saw almost a dozen appearances of the Batplane, a big improvement over the 1970s but still not much compared to the heyday of the 1940s and 1950s when the Batplane was featured in nearly every other issue. Batplane V made three more appearances, though in two of them it was slightly modified with scalloped wings and tail, as seen in Batman No. 400 (October 1986). The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...




Batplane VI, 1980

A mini-sized Batplane served in the 1980s. (Batman No. 365)

A new design for the Batplane appeared right at the beginning of the decade and was used often enough to justify calling it Batplane VI. As was often the case, the artists drawing it were not particularly consistent in its depiction, but it generally looked like a much shrunk Batplane IV, the one based on the F-101 Voodoo. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...




Batplane VII, 1980

A Batplane based on the F-15. (Untold Legends of the Batman, September 1980)

The creative folks at DC must not have been talking to each other much in 1980 because at about the same time the diminutive Batplane VI was introduced, another much larger Batplane was introduced in another Batman title. This one was again based on a real aircraft, if somewhat loosely, the McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle. The F-15 based Batplane VII made about as many appearances through the 1980s as did the little Batplane VI and even made it on to the cover of Detective Comics No. 541, the first time a Batplane had been on a cover in three decades. Unfortunately, it was exploding! Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F-15 Eagle is an all-weather tactical fighter designed to gain and maintain air superiority in aerial combat. ...




Batplane VIII, The Batwing

A typical Batwing. (Batman No. 640)

No Batplane was used in either Batman or Detective Comics during the entire decade of the 1990s. That changed in the new millennium, sort of. Detective Comics No. 750 (November 2000) presented a vague (and small) depiction of what is probably supposed to be the Batplane. Every "Batplane" that appeared from then on was actually what has come to be known as a "Batwing." The term Batwing was first applied to the distinctive aircraft that appeared in the Tim Burton movie, Batman, in 1989. That ship's design obviously owed a lot more to the shape of the Bat-emblem than it did to aerodynamics. A Batwing of a different but similar design was used in Batman Forever (1995) and another Batwing design was used in the highly popular Batman: The Animated Series TV series of the 1990s. More recently the monthly series Batman Confidential offered a history in which the Batman 'stole' the aircraft (a mothballed prototype recon craft) from his own company, Waynetech. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in November, 2000. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award-nominated American film director, writer and designer. ... Batman is a 1989 American Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character Batman. ... // Actress Kim Basinger and her brother Mick purchase Braselton, Georgia for $20 million. ... Batman Forever is a 1995 superhero film. ... The year 1995 in film involved some significant events. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... Batman Confidential is a monthly comic book series from DC Comics which debuted its first issue on December 6, 2006. ... WGBS redirects here. ...




Elseworlds Batplanes

Elseworlds is DC's term for stories that are set outside the normal comic continuity. These may be stories set in a different time or place that the character would not normally occupy (Batman in the Civil War, for example) or a cross-over with characters who would not normally encounter each other (Batman and Captain America, for example). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Captain America is a fictional comic book superhero published by Marvel Comics. ...


Claws of the Cat-Woman, 1939

An early jet-powered Batplane. (Claws of the Cat-Woman, September 1999)

A Batman/Tarzan cross-over story by Igor Kordey featured a sleek, jet-powered Batplane in 1939. In Claws of the Cat-Woman, Batman joins Tarzan in a battle against dark forces in Africa. They journey from Gotham City to Tarzan's homeland in a futuristic (for 1939) but believable jet-powered Batplane. The design seems to be a mixture of the Italian Caproni jet and the German rocket-powered Messerschmitt Me 163. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the year. ... 1914 Edition of Tarzan of the Apes Tarzan, a fictional character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, first appeared in the 1912 novel Tarzan of the Apes, and then in twenty-three sequels. ... Igor Kordey Igor Kordey is a Croatian-born comic book illustrator. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Caproni Campini N.1 was an early motorjet-powered test aeroplane. ... The Me 163 Komet, designed by Alexander Martin Lippisch, was the only operational rocket-powered fighter aircraft during the Second World War. ...




The Brave and the Bold, 1944

A 1940s Batplane with a propeller. (The Brave and the Bold No. 167)

The Brave and the Bold No. 167 (October 1980) teamed Batman and the Blackhawks in a story set during World War II. Since the Blackhawks were primarily fliers, Batman spent a lot of time in a sleek Batplane (designed by Dave Cockrum) that is unique to this story. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 596 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (648 × 652 pixel, file size: 87 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source: DC. Not available free and is only used to illustrate a specific point. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 596 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (648 × 652 pixel, file size: 87 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source: DC. Not available free and is only used to illustrate a specific point. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Blackhawk #12 (Autumn, 1946), Quality Comics. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The cover of Giant-Size X-Men #1 by Gil Kane & Cockrum, featuring characters Cockrum designed. ...


Cockrum, discussing his version of the Batplane, stated [3] “I used the Curtiss YP-37 as the basis for that. I loved the long front fuselage with the canopy pushed way back. It's a neat look. I felt a little guilty about not having a big bat head on the front of the plane, but I could never see how that version would work." The Curtiss P-36 Hawk, also know as Curtiss Hawk Model 75, was a U.S.-built fighter aircraft of the 1930s. ...




Batman & Captain America, 1945

A unique twin-engine Batplane. (Batman & Captain America, 1996)

John Byrne's 1996 Elseworlds graphic novel, Batman & Captain America is a cross-over story that pits the two heroes and their side-kicks, Robin and Bucky, against a team-up of the Joker and the Red Skull. Byrne found a neat solution to the problem of having the distinctive "batmask" on the Batplane and propellers, too. He made it a twin engine plane. This unique Batplane is used extensively throughout the story. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article or section may contain excessive or improper use of copyrighted images and/or audio files. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Robin is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Bucky (disambiguation). ... “The Joker” redirects here. ... Red Skull is the name of three Marvel Comics supervillains who are enemies of Captain America, other superheroes, and the United States in general. ...




In other media

A unique four-engine Batplane. (Gorilla City, 1976)

Gorilla City was one of two stories that was part of a record/comic combination released in 1976. Presumably, Gorilla City was on one side of the record and the other story on the other. The Batplane in Gorilla City is a unique design that appears to be large and is equipped with four jet engines slung under the wings as with most commercial jets of the period. This Batplane was capable of "cruising at 1,243 miles per hour." The comic was created by Cary Bates and Elliott Maggin. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cary Bates is a comic book and animation writer. ... Elliot S! Maggin is an American writer. ...



The Batwing as seen in Batman.[4] The Batwing[5] made its maiden flight in Tim Burton’s movie, just to be shot down by the Joker. Although there were five different models of the sleek craft, it was never built full size in its entirety. Anton Furst, production designer for the movie, described the Batwing thus: “It's a jet aircraft. A fighter aircraft. Again, pure expressionism… the Batwing is actually developed from the Bat-Symbol, the sickle wings and all. So it's actually a component of the whole image of Batman.”It has Machine Guns and Rockets. Batman is a 1989 American Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character Batman. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award-nominated American film director, writer and designer. ... Anton Furst is a distinguished production designer who won an Oscar for designing the Batmobile and the noirish nightmare version of Gotham City in Tim Burtons Batman (1989). ...



The Batwing as seen in Batman Forever (1995).

The third movie in the series, Batman Forever[6], recycled the basic shape of the Batwing from the first movie while exaggerating practically every aspect of the original design. It also recycled the capability of the Batplane II to turn itself into a submarine. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Batman Forever is a 1995 superhero film. ... Batman Forever is a 1995 superhero film. ... The Batplane (or Batwing) is the fictional aircraft for the comic book superhero Batman. ...



The Batplane as seen on Batman: The Animated Series (1992).

The Batplane as seen on Batman: The Animated Series. Although the initial design of Batman's aircraft in the animated series is similar in layout to the Batwings of the movies, it was called the "Batplane." In later seasons of the series, this version was replaced with a Batplane of more conventional design. That latter design was also seen in Justice League. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...



The Mattel produced Batplane inspired by Batman Begins. Mattel Inc. ... For the novel based on the film, see Batman Begins (novelization). ...



Lego, the Danish toy company, has a Lego Batman line that includes an incarnation of the Batplane, though it goes by the name of "The Batwing" (7782-The Batwing: The Joker's Aerial Assault). The set is featured alongside the Joker's helicopter. For other uses, see Lego (disambiguation). ... LEGO Batman is a theme of LEGO building sets based on the comics, films, and cartoons featuring the DC Comics superhero, Batman. ... “The Joker” redirects here. ...


In the Batman-themed motion simulator ride Batman Adventure - The Ride in Warner Bros. Movie World, riders seemingly follow the Batplane in pursuit of Mr. Freeze, Joker and Catwoman Simulator seating St. ... Batman Adventure: The Ride is a Batman-themed attraction at the Warner Bros. ... The parks entrance gate. ... Mr. ... “The Joker” redirects here. ... Catwoman is a fictional character associated with DC Comics Batman franchise and created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane. ...


See also

The Batboat from Batman: The Movie[1]. The Batboat is the fictional personal boat of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batcopter from Batman: The Movie. ... The Batcycle from Batman: The Movie. ... The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ...

References

  1. ^ TEC 108 (2/46): Batman and Robin upgrade the Batplane to jet propulsion, adding at least “100 miles per hour” to its maximum speed. ?/DS
  2. ^ WF 25 (11-12/46): Batman and Robin equip the Batplane with engineer Frank Folland’s “aeraquamobile” devices, allowing the Batplane to travel on land and as a speedboat as well as an airplane. DC/WM
  3. ^ Batmodels: The Batplane of 1944
  4. ^ Batman’s Gadgets.
  5. ^ Batman (1989 film) - Batwing
  6. ^ Batman Forever - Vehicles

External links


 
 

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