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Encyclopedia > Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Downtown Baton Rouge

Flag
Official seal of Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Seal
Nickname: Red Stick
Motto: Authentic Louisiana at every turn
Location of Baton Rouge in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana
Coordinates: 30°27′29″N 91°8′25″W / 30.45806, -91.14028
Country United States
State Louisiana
Parish East Baton Rouge Parish
Founded 1699
Incorporated 16 January 1817
Government
 - Mayor Melvin "Kip" Holden (D)
Area
 - City  79.1 sq mi (204.8 km²)
 - Land  76.8 sq mi (198.9 km²)
 - Water  2.2 sq mi (5.7 km²)
Elevation  46 ft (14 m)
Population (2004)
 - City 229,553
 - Density 2,964.7/sq mi (1,144.7/km²)
 - Metro 751,965
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 225
Website: http://www.brgov.com
Baton Rouge, Louisiana Portal

Baton Rouge (from the French bâton rouge), pronounced /ˈbætn ˈɹuːʒ/ in English, and Image:ltspkr.png/bɑtɔ̃ ʀuʒ/ in French, is the capital and the second largest city in Louisiana behind New Orleans. The effects of Hurricane Katrina have reduced the population of Orleans Parish such that East Baton Rouge Parish is currently more highly populated than Orleans Parish. Baton Rouge serves as the parish seat of East Baton Rouge Parish. In June 2005 East Baton Rouge Parish contained 412,000 residents. The Greater Baton Rouge population is approximately 700,000. Baton Rouge is a Canadian restaurant chain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1500 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Us-labtr. ... The flag of Baton Rouge flies on a cloudy day. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 547 pixelsFull resolution (1170 × 800 pixel, file size: 197 KB, MIME type: image/png) Made Using US Census Bureau Data. ... Location Location of St. ... Location Location of St. ... A Municipal corporation is a legal definition for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, towns, townships, villages, and boroughs. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Melvin L. Kip Holden (born August 12, 1952) is the Democratic Mayor-President of East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area code 225 is a telephone area code that covers part of southern Louisiana, including the Baton Rouge area. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The purpose of this page is to lay out our policies for handling sounds, and give people some useful information for handling sound files. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... NOLA redirects here. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... New Orleans (French: Nouvelle-Orléans) is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... East Baton Rouge Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ... Greater Baton Rouge (which is centered in Baton Rouge) an fast growing metropolitan area is inhabited by nearly 1 million residents (700,000 people), and is also known as Plantation Country, Authentic Louisiana at every turn, The capital region, the 225, and sits at the edge of the florida parishes...


Baton Rouge is located in the southeast portion of the state along the Mississippi River. It owes its location and its historical importance to its site upon Istrouma Bluff, the first bluff upriver from the Mississippi delta, which protects the city’s 224,097 residents from flooding and other natural disasters. In addition to the natural protection, the city sports a levee system stretching from the bluff southward to protect the riverfront and the southern agricultural areas. For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


Baton Rouge is a major industrial, petrochemical, and port center of the American South. The Port of Baton Rouge is the tenth largest in the United States in terms of weight.[1] The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...


The Baton Rouge region, like that of other capital cities in the United States, is called the "Capital Area."

Contents

History

French period (1699-1763)

Pierre Le Moyne, Sieur d'Iberville provided Baton Rouge as well as Lakes Pontchartrain and Maurepas their current names

The French words bâton rouge mean "red stick" in English. In 1699, French explorer Sieur d'Iberville led an exploration party of about 200 up the Mississippi River. On March 17, on a bluff on the east bank of the river (on what is now the campus of Southern University), they saw a reddish cypress pole festooned with bloody animal and fish heads, which they learned was a boundary marker between the hunting territories of the Bayougoula and the Houma tribes (the Bayougoula village was situated near the present-day town of Bayou Goula, LA; the Houma village was believed to be situated near the site of what is now Angola, LA). The French term survives. Image File history File links (PD by age) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links (PD by age) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Lake Pontchartrains north shore at Fontainebleau State Park near Mandeville, Louisiana in 2004 Lake Pontchartrain (local English pronunciation ) (French: Lac Pontchartrain, pronounced ) is a brackish lake located in southeastern Louisiana. ... Lake Maurepas is a saltwater lake in southeastern Louisiana. ... Pierre Le Moyne dIberville. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other Southern University campuses, see Southern University System. ... A slate boundary stone on Maesglase A boundary marker or boundary stone is a robust physical marker that identifies the start of a land boundary or the change in a boundary, especially a change in a direction of a boundary. ... Houma flag The Houma Tribe of Indians, or more properly, The United Houma Nation are native to the area around the mouth of the Mississippi River. ... White Castle is a town in Iberville Parish, Louisiana, in the United States. ... Angola is the Louisiana State Penitentiary and is estimated to be the largest prison in the U.S. with 5,000 inmates and over 1,000 staff. ...


British period (1763-1779)

On Feb. 10, 1763, the Treaty of Paris was signed, where by France gave all its territory in North America to Britain and Spain. Spain ended up with New Orleans and all land west of the Mississippi. Britain ended up with all land east of the Mississippi, except for New Orleans. Baton Rouge, now part of the newly-created British colony of West Florida, suddenly had strategic significance as the southwest-most corner of British North America. The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... This article is about the region. ... British North America consisted of the loyalist colonies and territories (i. ...


The British built Fort New Richmond just south of the eventual site of the Pentagon Barracks (in downtown Baton Rouge), and began plans for the development of a town. Land grants were given, resulting in an influx of the first settlers. Fort New Richmond was built by the British in 1764 on the left bank of the Mississippi River in what was later to become Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... The Pentagon Barracks are located at State Capitol Drive at River Road in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ...


When the older British colonies on the Atlantic coast of North America rebelled in 1776, the newer colony of West Florida, lacking a history of local government and distrustful of the potentially hostile Spanish nearby, remained loyal to the British crown.

Spanish statesman and soldier Bernardo de Galvez defeated the British colonial forces at Manchac, Baton Rouge, and Natchez in 1779.
Spanish statesman and soldier Bernardo de Galvez defeated the British colonial forces at Manchac, Baton Rouge, and Natchez in 1779.

In 1778, France declared war on Britain, and in 1779, Spain followed suit. That same year, Spanish Governor Don Bernardo de Galvez and his militia of about 1,400 men from New Orleans conquered Fort New Richmond. The fort was renamed Fort San Carlos. Once the Spanish controlled Baton Rouge, they ordered its inhabitants to declare their allegiance to Spain or leave. Most residents reluctantly stayed. Galvez subsequently captured Mobile in 1780 and Pensacola in 1781, thus ending the British presence on the Gulf Coast. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (605x746, 52 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (605x746, 52 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... The Battle of Fort Bute signalled the opening of Spanish intervention in the American Revolutionary War on the side of France and the United States. ... The Battle of Baton Rouge was decided on September 21, 1779 during the American Revolutionary War. ... Natchez is a city located in Adams County, Mississippi. ... Bernardo de G lvez, Conde de Galvez (23 July 1746 – 1786) was Spanish governor of Louisiana from 1777 to 1785, and Viceroy of New Spain 1785-1786. ... Combatants Spain Britain Commanders Bernardo de Gálvez Elias Durnford Strength 754 regulars and militia 98 regulars 169 militia Casualties Unknown 267 dead, wounded, or captured. ... Combatants Spain Britain Commanders Bernardo de Gálvez John Campbell Strength 7,000 regulars and militia 3,000 regulars, sailors, militia, and natives Casualties 74 dead, 198 wounded 105 dead, 382 wounded, 2,213 captured The Battle of Pensacola marked the culmination of Spains reconquest of Florida from Britain...


Spanish period (1779-1810)

See also: Battle of Baton Rouge (1779)

A colony of Pennsylvania German farmers settled to the south of town, having moved north to high ground from their original settlement on Bayou Manchac after a series of floods in the 1780s. They were known locally as "Dutch Highlanders" ("Dutch" being a corruption of the German "Deutsch") and today’s Highland Road cuts through their original indigo and cotton plantations. The two major roads off of Highland Road, Essen Lane and Siegen Lane were both named after cities in Germany. The Kleinpeter and Staring families (which Staring Lane is named after) have been prominent in Baton Rouge affairs ever since. The Battle of Baton Rouge was decided on September 21, 1779 during the American Revolutionary War. ... The Pennsylvania Dutch (more correctly Pennsylvania Deutsch or Pennsylvania German, speakers of the Pennsylvania German language) are a people of various religious affiliations, living mostly in central Pennsylvania, with cultural traditions dating back to the German immigrations to America in the 17th and 18th centuries. ... Essen is a city in the center of the Ruhr Area in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ... Siegen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ...


In 1800, the Tessier-Lafayette buildings were built on what is now Lafayette Street. The buildings are still standing today.


In 1805, the Spanish administrator, Don Carlos Louis Boucher de Grand Pré, commissioned a layout for what is today know as Spanish Town. Spanish Town, Baton Rouge, Louisiana is a historic district anchored by Spanish Town Road in Baton Rouge, the capital city of Louisiana. ...


In 1806, Elias Beauregard led a planning commission for what is today known as Beauregard Town. Beauregard Town, Baton Rouge, Louisiana is a historic district in downtown Baton Rouge, anchored by Government Street. ...


The Republic of West Florida (1810)

The Bonnie Blue Flag of West Florida
The Bonnie Blue Flag of West Florida

As a result of the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, Spanish West Florida found itself almost entirely surrounded by the United States and its possessions. The Spanish Fort at Baton Rouge became the only non-American post on the Mississippi River. Image File history File links Bonnieblue. ... Image File history File links Bonnieblue. ... For the musical, see Louisiana Purchase (musical) and Louisiana Purchase (film). ... This article is about the region. ...


Several of the inhabitants of West Florida began to have conventions to plan a rebellion, among them Fulwar Skipwith, a Baton Rouge native. At least one of these conventions was held in a house on a street in the city that has since been renamed Convention St. (in honor of the rebel conventions). On September 23, 1810, the rebels overcame the Spanish garrison at Baton Rouge, and unfurled the flag of the new Republic of West Florida, known as the Bonnie Blue Flag. The flag had a single white star on a blue field. The Bonnie Blue Flag also inspired the Lone Star flag of Texas. This article is about the region. ... Fulwar Skipwith (February 21, 1765 - January 7, 1839) was an American diplomat, who served as a U.S. Consul in Martinique, and later as the U.S. Consul-General in France. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Bonnie Blue Flag, a single white star on a blue field, was the flag of the short-lived Republic of West Florida. ...


The West Florida Republic existed for only seventy-four days, during which St. Francisville served as its capital. St. ...


Seizing upon the opportunity, President James Madison ordered W.C.C. Claiborne to move north and seize the fledgling republic for incorporation into the Territory of Orleans. Madison used the premise that the territory had always been a part of the U.S., citing the terms of the Louisiana Purchase, an explanation largely believed to be a deliberate error. The rebels were largely composed of American settlers, and they provided no resistance. With minor resentment, the stars and stripes were raised on December 10, 1810. For the musical, see Louisiana Purchase (musical) and Louisiana Purchase (film). ...


For the first time, all of the land that would become the State of Louisiana now lay within U.S. borders.


Since Louisiana statehood (1812-1860)

In 1812, Louisiana was admitted to the Union as a State. Baton Rouge's location continued to be a strategic military outpost. Between 1819 and 1822, the U.S. Army built the Pentagon Barracks, which became a major command post up through the Mexican American War (1846-1848). Lieutenant Colonel Zachary Taylor, supervised construction of the Pentagon Barracks and served as its commander. In the 1830s, what is known today as the "Old Arsenal" was built. The unique structure originally served as a powder magazine for the U.S. Army Post. The Pentagon Barracks are located at State Capitol Drive at River Road in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... The Mexican-American War was a war fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850)[2] was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ...


In 1825, Baton Rouge was visited by the Marquis de Lafayette as part of his triumphal tour of the United States, and he was the guest of honor at a town ball and banquet. To celebrate the occasion, the town renamed Second Street as Lafayette Street. Marie-Joseph-Paul-Roch-Yves-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (September 6, 1757 – May 20, 1834), was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American Revolutionary War and early French Revolution. ...

The old Louisiana State Capitol Castle.
The old Louisiana State Capitol Castle.

In 1846, the Louisiana state legislature in New Orleans decided to move the seat of government to Baton Rouge. As in many states, representatives from other parts of Louisiana feared a concentration of power in the state's largest city. In 1840, New Orleans' population was around 102,000, fourth largest in the U.S. The 1840 population of Baton Rouge, on the other hand, was only 2,269. Baton Rouge, Louisiana: The old State Capital Castle, from early 20th century postcard This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ...


New York architect James Dakin was hired to design the new Capital building in Baton Rouge, and rather than mimic the federal Capitol Building in Washington, as so many other states had done, he conceived a Neo-Gothic medieval castle overlooking the Mississippi, complete with turrets and crenellations. In 1859, the Capitol was featured and favorably described in DeBow's Review, the most prestigious periodical in the antebellum South.[2] Mark Twain, however, as a steamboat pilot in the 1850s, loathed the sight of it, "It is pathetic ... that a whitewashed castle, with turrets and things ... should ever have been built in this otherwise honorable place." (Life on the Mississippi, Chapter 40)[3] James Harrison Dakin (August 24, 1806 - May 10, 1852), American architect, was the son of James (1783-1819) and Lucy Harrison Dakin (1784-1826) of Hudson, New York, and born in Northeast Township. ... DeBows Review was a highly influential and widely circulated magazine of agricultural, commercial, and industrial progress and resource in the American South during the middle of the 19th century. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Life on the Mississippi cover Life on the Mississippi is a memoir by Mark Twain detailing his days as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River before the American Civil War. ...


Despite his view of the Capitol, Twain was fond of Baton Rouge, "Baton Rouge was clothed in flowers, like a bride — no, much more so; like a greenhouse. For we were in the absolute South now — no modifications, no compromises, no half-way measures. The magnolia trees in the Capitol grounds were lovely and fragrant, with their dense rich foliage and huge snowball blossoms....We were certainly in the South at last; for here the sugar region begins, and the plantations — vast green levels, with sugar-mill and negro quarters clustered together in the middle distance — were in view." (Life on the Mississippi, Chapter 40) [4] Life on the Mississippi cover Life on the Mississippi is a memoir by Mark Twain detailing his days as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River before the American Civil War. ...


The Civil War (1860-1865)

See also: Louisiana in the American Civil War and Battle of Baton Rouge (1862)
Map of Baton Rouge in 1863
Map of Baton Rouge in 1863

Southern secession was triggered by the 1860 election of Republican Abraham Lincoln because slave states feared that he would make good on his promise to stop the expansion of slavery and would thus put it on a course toward extinction. Many Southerners thought that even if Lincoln did not abolish slavery, sooner or later another Northerner would do so, and that it was thus time to leave the Union. The state of Louisiana during the American Civil War was a part of the Confederate States of America. ... Combatants Confederate States of America United States of America Commanders John C. Breckinridge Thomas Williams† and Thomas W. Cahill Strength 2600 2500 Casualties 478 dead 371 dead The Battle of Baton Rouge (or Magnolia Cemetery) was a ground and naval battle in the American Civil War fought in East Baton... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1440 × 1152 pixel, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Map of old Baton Rouge. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1440 × 1152 pixel, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Map of old Baton Rouge. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


In January 1861, Louisiana elected delegates to a state convention to decide the state's course of action. The convention voted for secession 112 to 17. Baton Rouge raised a number of volunteer companies for Confederate service, including the Pelican Rifles, the Delta Rifles, the Creole Guards, and the Baton Rouge Fencibles (about one-third of the town's male population eventually volunteered). Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ...


The Confederates gave up Baton Rouge (which only had a population of 5,429 in 1860) without a fight, deciding to consolidate their forces elsewhere. In May 1862, Union troops entered the city and began the occupation of Baton Rouge. The Confederates only made one attempt to retake Baton Rouge. The Confederates lost the battle and the town was severely damaged. However, Baton Rouge escaped the level of devastation faced by cities that were major conflict points during the Civil War, and the city still has many structures that predate it.


In 1886, a statue of a Confederate soldier was dedicated to the memory of those who fought in the Civil War on the corner of Third Street and North Blvd.


Late 19th and early 20th centuries

Capitol Building.
Capitol Building.

The mass migration of ex-slaves into urban areas in the South also affected Baton Rouge. It has been estimated that in 1860, blacks made up just under one-third of the town's population. By the 1880 U.S. census, however, Baton Rouge was 60 percent black. Not until the 1920 census would the white population of Baton Rouge again exceed 50 percent. After the end of Reconstruction the white population regained control of the state's and the city's institutions, and segregation and "Jim Crow" laws were enforced, though leavened with a dose of paternalism (Radical Republican control in Louisiana had never been strong outside of New Orleans in any case). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 593 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 741 pixel, file size: 128 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 593 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 741 pixel, file size: 128 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... This box:      The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965. ... The Radical Republicans were an influential faction of American politicians in the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras, 1860-1876. ...


By 1880, Baton Rouge was recovering economically and psychologically, though the population that year still was only 7,197 and its boundaries had remained the same. The carpetbaggers and scalawags of Reconstruction politics were replaced by middle-class white Democrats who loathed the Republicans, eulogized the Confederacy, and preached white supremacy. This "Bourbon" era was short-lived in Baton Rouge, however, replaced by a more management-oriented local style of conservatism in the 1890s and on into the early 20th century. Increased civic-mindedness and the arrival of the Louisville, New Orleans, and Texas Railroad led to the development of more forward-looking leadership, which included the construction of a new waterworks, widespread electrification of homes and businesses, and the passage of several large bond issues for the construction of public buildings, new schools, paving of streets, drainage and sewer improvements, and the establishment of a scientific municipal public health department. In United States history, carpetbaggers were Northerners who moved to the South during Reconstruction between 1865 and 1877. ... In the United States, a Scalawag was a Southern white who joined the Republican party in the ex-Confederate South during Reconstruction. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Louisville, New Orleans & Texas Railroad was built between 1888 and 1890 and was admitted to the Illinois Central Railroad system in 1892. ...

Baton Rouge waterfront during the record high water of the Mississippi River Flood of 1912
Baton Rouge waterfront during the record high water of the Mississippi River Flood of 1912

At the same time, the state government was constructing in Baton Rouge a new Institute for the Blind and a School for the Deaf. LSU moved from Pineville to temporary quarters at the old arsenal and barracks and Southern University relocated from New Orleans to Scotlandville (just north of Baton Rouge at the time but now within the city limits). Finally, legal challenges to the Standard Oil Company in Texas led its board of directors to move its refining operations in 1909 to the banks of the Mississippi just above town; Exxon is still the largest private employer in Baton Rouge. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 159 pixelsFull resolution (3591 × 714 pixel, file size: 364 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 159 pixelsFull resolution (3591 × 714 pixel, file size: 364 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... For other Southern University campuses, see Southern University System. ... Standard Oil (Esso) was a predominant integrated oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. ... This article is about the fuel brand. ...


In the 1930s, the new Louisiana State Capitol building was built under the direction of Huey P. Long, and became the tallest capitol building in the United States. The old state capitol is now a museum. Louisiana State Capitol The Louisiana State Capitol building is the capitol building of the state of Louisiana, located in Baton Rouge. ... Huey Pierce Long (August 30, 1893–September 10, 1935), known as The Kingfish, was an American politician; he was governor of Louisiana (1928–1932), Senator (1932–1935) and a presidential hopeful before his assassination. ...


In the late 1940s, Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parish became a consolidated city/parish with a mayor/president in its government. It was also one of the first cities in the nation to consolidate, and the parish surrounds three incorporated cities: Baker, Zachary, and Central.


2000s

In the 2000s, Baton Rouge has proven to be one of the fastest growing cities in the South, not so much in population but in technology. Baton Rouge is well wired, and ranks #19 as one of the most wired cities (more wired than New Orleans, and most of the 25 largest cities in the United States) There are now many sky-eye traffic cameras at major intersections and countless other advances. Although, Baton Rouge's city population was not growing fast, it has overtaken Mobile, Alabama, Shreveport, and many other currently declining cities. After the 2000 census, Baton Rouge had a slight decline in population, with 224,000 from recent estimates. This is attributed by some to white flight. Historic Southern United States. ... It has been suggested that List of people from Mobile, Alabama be merged into this article or section. ... : Port City , River City , Rachet City : The Next Great City of the South United States Louisiana Caddo 117. ... White flight is a term for the demographic trend where working- and middle-class white people move away from increasingly racial-minority inner-city neighborhoods to white suburbs and exurbs. ...

The flag of Baton Rouge flies on a cloudy day.

Baton Rouge was rated one of the largest mid-sized business cities, after Hurricane Katrina It was also one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the U.S. (under 1 million), with 600,000 in 2000 and 700,000 since 2000. Aside from politics, there is also a vibrant mix of cultures found throughout Louisiana, thus forming the basis of the city motto: "Authentic Louisiana at every turn". Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 299 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I made this myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 299 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I made this myself. ...


Hurricane Katrina

On August 29, 2005, Baton Rouge was changed, perhaps forever, by Hurricane Katrina. Although the damage was relatively minor compared to New Orleans (generally light to moderate except for fallen trees), Baton Rouge experienced power outages and service disruptions due to the hurricane. In addition, the city provided refuge for residents from New Orleans. Baton Rouge served as a headquarters for Federal (on site) and State emergency coordination and disaster relief in Louisiana. is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... NOLA redirects here. ...


The city executed massive rescue efforts for those who evacuated the New Orleans area. Schools and convention centers such as the Baton Rouge River Center opened their doors to evacuees. LSU's basketball arena, the Pete Maravich Assembly Center, and the adjacent LSU Field House were converted into emergency hospitals. Victims were flown in by helicopter (landing in the LSU Track Stadium) and brought by the hundreds in buses to be treated. Here patients were triaged and, depending on their status, were either treated immediately or transported further west to Lafayette, Louisiana. As a result of this the LSU football team was forced to play their originally home scheduled game against Arizona State in Arizona. The Baton Rouge River Center, formerly called the Riverside Centroplex, is the chief perfroming area for the capital city of the state of Louisiana. ... Pete Maravich Assembly Center is a 14,164-seat multi-purpose arena in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... : Hub City : The Heart of Cajun Country United States Louisiana Lafayette 47. ...


As a result, by August 31, TV station WAFB had reported that the city's population had more than doubled from about 228,000 to at least 450,000 and East Baton Rouge Parish's population shot up to almost 600,000 since the mandatory evacuation had been issued. That day, Mayor-President Kip Holden was expected to host a conference to discuss how to effectively enroll evacuated children into the East Baton Rouge Parish public school system. During late 2005 and half of 2006 traffic in the city was more congested to the point of hours long stand stills since the evacuation of the Gulf South but since then traffic is on somewhat normal levels for a parish that had 412,000 pre-Katrina residents. is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... WAFB is the CBS-affiliated television station in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Melvin L. Kip Holden (born August 12, 1952) is the Democratic Mayor-President of East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ...


Crime

Crime in Baton Rouge is higher than the national average. In 2005, the city's murder rate was higher than many of the largest U.S cities, ranking 13th out of U.S cities its size, with 49 murders.[5][6] There were a total of 56 homicides in 2006.[7] The following table of 2005 murders is based on Federal Bureau of Investigation Uniform Crime Reports statistics that initially became available in September 2006. ...


Geography and climate

Baton Rouge is located at 30°27′29″N, 91°8′25″W (30.458090, -91.140229).GR1


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 204.8 km² (79.1 sq mi). 199.0 km² (76.8 sq mi) of it is land and 5.7 km² (2.2 sq mi) of it (2.81%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Baton Rouge along with Tallahassee, FL and Austin, TX is one of the southernmost capital cities in the lower 48 U.S


Climate

Baton Rouge is humid-subtropical, with mild, short, wet, and somewhat warm winters and long, hot, humid, wet summers.

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F 84 85 91 92 98 103 101 105 104 94 87 85
Norm High °F 60 63.9 71 77.3 84 89.2 90.7 90.9 87.4 79.7 70.1 62.8
Norm Low °F 40.2 43.1 49.6 55.8 64.1 70.2 72.7 71.9 67.5 56.4 47.9 42.1
Rec Low °F 9 15 20 32 44 53 58 58 43 30 21 8
Precip (in) 6.19 5.1 5.07 5.56 5.34 5.33 5.96 5.86 4.84 3.81 4.76 5.26
Source: USTravelWeather.com [1]

Disasters

Baton Rouge rarely suffers from natural disasters. Earthquakes are very rare (unlike farther north up the Mississippi River). The Mississippi River poses little threat to the highly populated sections of the city because Baton Rouge is built on natural bluffs at higher elevations than the river. However, the outlying areas near the Amite and Comite rivers are very easily flooded if already saturated by previous precipitation. Baton Rouge rarely sees tornadoes and storm surges are impossible because of its distance inland. Seismic map New Madrid Seismic Zone - USGS The New Madrid Seismic Zone, also known as the Reelfoot Rift or the New Madrid Fault Line, is a major seismic zone, located in the mideastern United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Overview The Comite Rivers source lies in the hills of the Felicianas and stretches south past Baton Rouge. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... ...


While hurricanes often affect the area, they rarely hit Baton Rouge at their full force due to the inland location. Instead, due to the projection of the Louisiana peninsula into the Gulf of Mexico, storms tend to hit that part of the state then steer northward. Storms that head on a more westerly route tend to upswing sharply, angling more toward the western coastal areas, from Morgan City to the Acadiana parishes. The last hurricane to threaten the city with a direct hit was Hurricane Andrew in 1992, which missed the city and took a direct path through the Atchafalaya Basin, some forty miles west of the city. Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita in 2005 followed this pattern as well, with Katrina veering east to New Orleans and eastward and Rita striking the Lake Charles, Louisiana area and the state's western border with Texas. This article is about weather phenomena. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Morgan City is the name of some places in the United States of America: Morgan City, Louisiana Morgan City, Mississippi This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Map of Acadiana Region with the Cajun Heartland USA subregion highlighted in dark red. ... Lowest pressure 922 mbar (hPa; 27. ... The Atchafalaya River is a distributary of the Mississippi and Red rivers, approximately 170 mi (270 km) long, in south central Louisiana in the United States. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Lowest pressure 895 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $10 billion (2005 USD)[1] Fatalities 7 direct, 113 indirect Areas affected Bahamas, Florida, Cuba, Yucatán Peninsula, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas Part of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane Rita is the fourth-most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded and the most... This article is about the City of Lake Charles, La. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


Demographics

Baton Rouge Governmental Building.
City of Baton Rouge
Population by year [2]
1950 125,629
1960 152,419
1970 165,963
1980 219,419
1990 219,531
2000 227,818
2004 224,097

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 227,818 people, 88,973 households, and 52,672 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,144.7/km² (2,964.7/sq mi). There were 97,388 housing units at an average density of 489.4/km² (1,267.3/sq mi). The racial makeup of the city was 50.02% African American, 45.70% White, 0.18% Native American, 2.62% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.49% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.72% of the population. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 971 KB) I created this file myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 971 KB) I created this file myself. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 88,973 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.8% were married couples living together, 19.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.8% were non-families. 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.12. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 24.4% under the age of 18, 17.5% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 90.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.3 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $30,368, and the median income for a family was $40,266. Males had a median income of $34,893 versus $23,115 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,512. About 18.0% of families and 24.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.4% of those under age 18 and 13.6% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Tallest buildings

Baton Rouge currently has several towers in the works. One project includes a 17 story office, another a 30+ story condominium tower to be the first towers built downtown in two decades.

RiverPlace Condominiums
JP Morgan Chase Building and Riverside Tower
Name Stories Height
RiverPlace Condominiums (groundbreaking between June and September) 36
Louisiana State Capitol (tallest state capitol building in the U.S.) 34 460 ft (140 m)
Riverfront Office Tower (proposed) 25
One American Place 24 310 ft (94 m)
JPMorgan Chase Tower 21 277 ft (84 m)
Riverside Tower North 20 229 ft (70 m)
Marriott Hotel Baton Rouge 22 224 ft (68 m)
Laurel Street Tower (on-hold) 19
Catholic-Presbyterian Apartments 14
Dean Tower 14
Two City Plaza (groundbreaking in August) 12
Galvez Office Building 12
Kirby Smith Hall (LSU) 13
Memorial Tower (LSU) 175 ft (52m)
Saint Joseph's Cathedral 165 ft (50m)
Louisiana State Office Building 12 160 ft (49 m)
Jacobs Plaza 13 144 ft (44 m)
Bluebonnet Towers (3 residential towers) 12
LaSalle Office Building 12
Shaw Plaza 12
Wooddale State Office Building 12
Hilton Capital Center 11 132 ft (40 m)
19th Judicial District Court Building 10-11
Sheraton Baton Rouge Convention Center Hotel 10 125 ft (38 m)
  • Baton Rouge Buildings
  • Baton Rouge and Environs

Image File history File links RiverRoad_ariel_lg. ... Image File history File links RiverRoad_ariel_lg. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 902 KB) I made this myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 902 KB) I made this myself. ... RiverPlace Condominiums is a residential tower that is proposed to be built on the Baton Rouge Riverfront and currently in the design phase, but is expected to reach groundbreaking this year. ... Louisiana State Capitol The Louisiana State Capitol building is the capitol building of the state of Louisiana, located in Baton Rouge. ... One American Place is a skyscraper in Downtown Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM TYO: 8634 ) is one of the oldest financial services firms in the world. ... Marriott International, Inc. ... Memorial Tower, or the Campanile as it is sometimes called, is a 175 foot clock tower in the center of Louisiana State Universitys campus in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... The Shaw Group is a Fortune 500[1] corporation headquartered in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Entrance of the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California Beverly Hilton Hotel viewed from Wilshire Boulvard Hilton is a brand of the Hilton Hotels Corporation, based in Beverly Hills, California. ... sheraton is a late 18th century neoclassical English furniture style, in vogue ca 1785 - 1800, that was named afterwards (by 19th century collectors and dealers) to credit furniture designer Thomas Sheraton, whose books of engraved designs capture this style. ...

Neighborhoods and suburbs

  • Downtown - Baton Rouge's central business district.
  • Spanish Town - Located between the Mississippi River and I-110, it is one of the city's more diverse neighborhoods and home to the State Capitol Building and the city's largest Mardi Gras Parade.
  • Beauregard Town - A historic district between the downtown area and Old South Baton Rouge. Many of the homes have been renovated and are used as law offices.
  • Garden District - The Garden District is located in Baton Rouge's Mid-City area where Park Boulevard intersects Government Street. The Garden District is an established historic area with many upscale homes.
  • Old South Baton Rouge - An old section of the city directly south of downtown and Beauregard Town, it stretches south from I-10 and along the river to Brightside Lane. After years of neglect and a crumbling infrastructure, the city is targeting the neighborhood in the city's largest ever revitalization project.
  • LSU/Lakeshore - Home to LSU's main campus, the University Lakes and the City Park lake. It includes neighborhoods like University Hills, University Gardens, College Town, State Street, Carlotta Street, and Arlington. Homes directly on the lakeshore are some of the most expensive within the city limits, and the lakeshore itself is a popular place for jogging, walking and bicycling.
  • Mid-City - Bound by I-110 on the west, College and N. Foster on the east, Choctaw to the north and I-10 to the south. It includes several neighborhoods like Ogden Park, Bernard Terrace, and Capital Heights. Always a socially and economically diverse area, Mid City is quickly regaining popularity due to urban renewal and gentrification. Includes historic Baton Rouge Magnet High School.
  • Brookstown - Is bordered by Airline Highway to the east, Hollywood St to the north, McClelland St to the west and Evangeline St to the south.
  • Melrose Place - Melrose Place is home to BRCC and is between N. Ardenwood and N. Foster Rd.
  • Melrose Place East/Mall City - Is bordered by Florida Blvd (US 190) to the south, Greenwell Springs Rd to the north, Airline Highway to the east, and N. Ardenwood Dr to the west. However the border is traditionally between Mall at Cortana and the old Bon Marche Mall.
  • Inniswold - Area around Bluebonnet Rd between Jefferson Hwy and I-10.
  • Goodwood - an older subdivision located between Government Street, Jefferson Highway, Airline Highway, and Old Hammond Highway.
  • Southdowns - an older subdivision located between Perkins Road and Bayou Duplantier, also between the University Lake and Pollard Estates. Hosts one of Baton Rouge's Mardi Gras parades, on the Friday night before Mardi Gras.
  • Gardere - an area using Gardere Lane (LA Highway 327 Spur) as its main artery. Found between Nicholson Drive and Highland Road, located near St. Jude the Apostle Church. Dominated by low-rent housing prior to Hurricane Katrina.
  • Westminster [3] - Between Essen and Bluebonnet off Jefferson Highway, around the Baton Rouge Country Club.
  • Oak Hills Place -Bordered by Bluebonnet Boulevard to the west, Perkins Road to the north, and Highland Road to the south. South of the Mall of Louisiana.
  • Broadmoor - A mostly mid-century neighborhood founded in 1950
  • Scotlandville - The largest section of north Baton Rouge also has one of the highest crime rates in the city. It was once incorporated as a city, before being annexed by Baton Rouge. The area is bounded by Plank Road to the east, Thomas Road to the north, the Mississippi river to the west, and Airline Hwy to the south, and surrounds the Southern University campus and the Exxon chemical plants.
  • Shenandoah - A very large subdivision built in the 1970s and 1980's, located between South Harrell's Ferry and Tiger Bend Roads with its westernmost boundary Jones Creek Road. Schools in this subdivision include: Shenandoah Elementary and St. Michael the Archangel.
  • Shenandoah North - A small subdivision, built in the late 1980s, located off the north end of Jones Creek Road.
  • Sherwood Forest - A large, established neighborhood with large, older homes. Located just east of "Broadmoor." Sherwood Forest Blvd. is to the south, Flannery Rd. is to the east, Florida Blvd. is to the north, and Sharp Rd. is to the west.
  • Village St. George - located off Siegen Lane near the Mall of Louisiana. Named after nearby St. George Catholic Church.
  • Brownfields - located near Baker off Committee Drive and bounded between Foster Road and Plank Road.
  • Zion City - Between Hooper Road and Airline Highway.
  • Monticello - located off Greenwell Springs Road between the Baton Rouge City Limits and Central City, site of Greenbriar Elementary School.
  • Glen Oaks - located in northern Baton Rouge between Mickens Road and Airline Highway, site of Glen Oaks High School.
  • Old Jefferson - located off Jefferson Highway near Antioch and Tiger Bend Roads. Site of Most Blessed Sacrament School and Woodlawn High School.
  • University Club - A newer neighborhood built inside the University Club Golf course located off of Nicholson Drive on the south edge of Baton Rouge.

Spanish Town, Baton Rouge, Louisiana is a historic district anchored by Spanish Town Road in Baton Rouge, the capital city of Louisiana. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Interstate 110 is an 8. ... For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... Beauregard Town, Baton Rouge, Louisiana is a historic district in downtown Baton Rouge, anchored by Government Street. ... Old South Baton Rouge (OSBR) is a project aimed to help revitalize the area between Louisiana State University and Downtown Baton Rouge. ... The Garden District is a residential neighborhood located in Baton Rouges Mid-City area where Park Boulevard intersects Government Street. ... 1999 photograph looking northeast on Chicagos now demolished Cabrini-Green housing project, one of many urban renewal efforts. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Airline Highway is a rural divided highway in the U.S. state of Louisiana, built in the 1930s and 1940s to bypass the older Jefferson Highway. ... Baton Rouge Community College, an open admissions, two-year post-secondary public community college in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, was established on June 28, 1995. ... United States Highway 190 is an east-west United States highway. ... Airline Highway is a rural divided highway in the U.S. state of Louisiana, built in the 1930s and 1940s to bypass the older Jefferson Highway. ... Inniswold is a census-designated place (CDP) in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, United States. ... Interstate 10, a major transcontinental Interstate Highway in the Southern U.S., runs across the south part of the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Gardere is a census-designated place (CDP) in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, United States. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Oak Hills Place is a census-designated place (CDP) in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, United States. ... Shenandoah is a census-designated place located in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... Village St. ... Brownfields is a census-designated place located in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... A baker prepares fresh rolls A baker is someone who primarily bakes and sells bread. ... Airline Highway is a rural divided highway in the U.S. state of Louisiana, built in the 1930s and 1940s to bypass the older Jefferson Highway. ... Monticello is a census-designated place located in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... Old Jefferson is a census-designated place located in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... Woodlawn High School is a high school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ...

Points of Interest

Arsenal Park overlooking Capitol Lake
Arsenal Park overlooking Capitol Lake
  • Alex Box Stadium - Baseball stadium for LSU.
  • Baton Rouge River Center - Entertainment complex.
  • Baton Rouge Zoo - BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo is home to over 1,800 animals from around the world. The Baton Rouge Zoo was the first zoo in Louisiana to achieve the distinguished honor of being accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.
  • Blue Bayou Waterpark - Blue Bayou has over 20 water rides. Favorites are the "Mad Moccasin," "Conja" and "Racers."
  • BREC, LSU, BRAS Highland Road Observatory - An astronomical observatory for education and recreation that provides regular events open to the public.
  • Dixie Landin' Amusement Park - Dixie Landin' contains 26 rides, 10 games and more. Contains such rides as the "Ragin' Cajun," "Flyin' Tigers," "Gilbeau's Galaxi" and "The Glimmer."
  • Capitol Lakes - located north of the State Capitol.
  • City Park Golf Course - Baton Rouge's first public golf course.
  • F.G. Clark Center - basketball arena for Southern University.
  • The Herbarium of LSU
  • Huey Long Field House - one-time student union for LSU. When built, it featured the largest indoor swimming pool in the country at that time.
  • Independence Park Botanic Gardens - Includes a rose garden, crape myrtle garden, sensory garden, children's forest, and Louisiana iris garden.
  • Memorial Stadium - 21,395-seat football stadium. Was built in 1956 in memory of the men and women who fought and served Baton Rouge during the two World Wars and the Korean War.
  • Laurens Henry Cohn, Sr Memorial Plant Arboretum - contains more than 120 species of trees and shrubs on 16 acres.
  • Louisiana Arts and Science Museum - Contains art and science galleries, an Ancient Egypt Gallery, and simulated space travel in the Challenger Learning Center. LASM is also home to the Irene W. Pennington Planetarium and ExxonMobil Space Theater, which offers planetarium shows and large-format films.
  • Louisiana Museum of Natural History - Contains two main exhibit areas, one in the Textile and Costume Museum, the other in the Museum of Natural Science.
  • Louisiana State Capitol - tallest state capitol building in the United States.
  • LSU - One of only thirteen American universities designated as a land-grant, sea-grant and space-grant research center.
  • LSU Museum of Art - located within the Shaw Center for the Arts. LSU MOA's permanent collection consists of about 4,000 objects with an emphasis placed on American, British, and, in particular, Louisiana art.
  • LSU Museum of Natural Science - Was founded in 1936. Is one of the nation's largest natural history museums, with holdings of over 2.5 million specimens. As the only comprehensive research museum in the south-central United States, the LSU Museum of Natural Science fulfills a variety of scientific and educational roles.
  • LSU Rural Life Museum - Commemorates the contributions made by Baton Rouge's various cultural groups through interpretive programs and events throughout the year.
  • LSU University Lakes
  • Magnolia Mound Plantation House - Built c. 1791. Is a rare survivor of the vernacular architecture influenced by early settlers from France and the West Indies.
  • Mall at Cortana - Contains Dillards, Sears, JCPenney, Macy's, and over 110 specialty stores and services.
  • Mall of Louisiana - Contains Dillards, Sears, JCPenney, and Macy's. Has over 160 stores and services. It will soon incorporate 11 upscale stores, as well as four additional restaurants.[8]
  • Mount Hope Plantation
  • The Old Arsenal Powder Magazine - Is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Was built around 1838.
  • Old State Capitol - Louisiana's Old State Capitol Center for Political and Governmental History houses several interactive state-of-the-art exhibits including "Huey Long Live! The Kingfish Speaks", "We The People," "The Governor Huey P. Long Assassination Exhibit" and more.
  • Pennington Biomedical Research Center - The largest academically based nutrition research center in the world.
  • Perkins Rowe (coming soon) - An urban village with residences, theaters, restaurants, and specialty shops.
  • Pete Maravich Assembly Center - The "PMAC" is a 13,472-seat multi-purpose arena. The arena opened in 1972, and is home to the LSU Tigers and Lady Tigers basketball teams, volleyball team and gymnastics team. It was originally known as the "LSU Assembly Center," but was renamed in memory of Pete Maravich, a Tiger basketball legend, shortly after his death in 1988.
  • Poplar Grove Plantation - Began life not as a home but as the Bankers' Pavilion at the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition of 1884 in New Orleans. The exposition was held at what is today Audubon Park in uptown New Orleans. Was moved upriver on a barge in 1886 and became the home of sugar planter Horace Wilkinson and his wife, Julia.
  • Shaw Center for the Arts - Performing-art venue and fine arts museum located at 100 Lafayette Street downtown.
  • Southern University - one of the most well known historically black colleges and universities.
  • Tiger Stadium LSU football stadium.
  • USS Kidd - a Fletcher class destroyer, was the 1st ship of the United States Navy to be named for Rear Adm. Isaac C. Kidd, Commander of Battleship Division 1, who died on the bridge of his flagship USS Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Alex Box Stadium is a baseball stadium in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... The Baton Rouge River Center, formerly called the Riverside Centroplex, is the chief perfroming area for the capital city of the state of Louisiana. ... The Baton Rouge Zoo is located 15 minutes North of downtown Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (formerly the American Zoo and Aquarium Association), or AZA is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the advancement of zoos and aquariums in the areas of conservation, education, science, and recreation. ... Galaxi (also Galaxy) is the common name of a series of mass-produced roller coasters manufactured primarily by Italian company S.D.C, which went bankrupt in 1993. ... City Park Golf Course is a public golf course in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and was the first public golf course and the citys only public course until the mid-1950s. ... F.G. Clark Center is a 7,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... For other Southern University campuses, see Southern University System. ... Huey Long Field House, on the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, was constructed in 1932. ... The Independence Park Botanic Gardens are botanical gardens located in Independence Park at 7950 Independence Boulevard, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... See: The White House Rose Garden. ... Species About 50, including: Lagerstroemia indica Lagerstroemia speciosa The Crape-myrtles Lagerstroemia are a genus of about 50 species of deciduous and evergreen trees or large shrubs native to east Asia and Australia. ... BREC Memorial Stadium is a 21,395-seat football stadium in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... There have been two World Wars, now more commonly known as World War I or First World War (from 1914 to 1918), and World War II or Second World War (from 1939 to 1945). ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... For other uses, see Exon (disambiguation). ... Louisiana State Capitol The Louisiana State Capitol building is the capitol building of the state of Louisiana, located in Baton Rouge. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... A land grant is a gift of land made by the government for projects such as roads, railroads, or rewards for military service, or especially academic institutions. ... The United States of America National Sea Grant College Program encourages wise stewardship of marine resources through research, education, outreach and technology transfer. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... The Shaw Center features live music. ... The LSU Rural Life Museum is a museum of Louisiana history in Baton Rouge, USA. It is located on the Burden Plantation, a 40 acre agricultural research experiment station. ... The Magnolia Mound Plantation House is a National Register of Historic Places site that is located at 2161 Nicholson Drive, approximately one mile south from downtown Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. The house and other structures on the Magnolia Mound Plantation are examples of the architectural influences of early settlers from... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... Dillards may refer to: Dillards, a major department store chain in the United States The Dillards, a progressive bluegrass band This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Sears, Roebuck and Company is an American mid-range chain of international department stores, founded by Richard Sears and Alvah Roebuck in the late 19th century. ... J. C. Penney Company, Inc. ... This article is about the R. H. Macy & Co. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The old Louisiana State Capitol Castle, 1978. ... The Pennington Biomedical Research Center, located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is a campus of the Louisiana State University System and conducts both clinical and basic research. ... Pete Maravich Assembly Center is a 14,164-seat multi-purpose arena in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... LSU (Louisiana State University) is a member of the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) and the Southeastern Conference. ... Peter Press Maravich (June 22, 1947 – January 5, 1988) was a Serb-American basketball player known for his dazzling ballhandling, incredible shooting abilities, and creative passing. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The Shaw Center features live music. ... For other Southern University campuses, see Southern University System. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Tiger Stadium is the home field of Louisiana State University football team. ... USS Kidd (DD-661), a Fletcher-class destroyer, was the 1st ship of the United States Navy to be named for Rear Adm. ... The United States Navy commissioned 175 Fletcher-class destroyers between 1942 and 1944. ... USS McFaul underway in the Atlantic Ocean. ... USN redirects here. ... Captain (future Rear Admiral) Isaac C. Kidd, USN in a picture taken while he was Chief of Staff to the Commander, Base Force, U.S. Fleet Isaac Campbell Kidd (March 26, 1884 – December 7, 1941) was an American Rear Admiral in the United States Navy who was killed on the... This article is about the lead ship, store, or product of a group. ... For the memorial to USS Arizona (BB-39) in Pearl Harbor, see USS Arizona Memorial. ... This article is about the actual attack. ...

Media

Greater Baton Rouge is well served by television and radio. The market is the 94th largest Designated Market Area (DMA) in the United States, serving 317,550 homes or 0.282% of the U.S. population. A designated market area is a group of counties in the United States that are covered by a specific television station. ...


Television

Major television network affiliates serving the area include:

KPBN 11, KZUP 19, and WBTR 41 also operate as independent stations in the area, along with WLFT 30 providing mainly religious programming. Other cable-only stations include: Metro 21, Cox 4, and Catholic Life Channel 15. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... WAFB is the CBS-affiliated television station in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... CBSs first color logo, which debuted in the fall of 1965. ... WBRL-CA is a class A television station in Baton Rouge, Louisiana affiliated with The WB network. ... “The CW” redirects here. ... Louisiana Public Broadcasting (LPB) is a state-run, viewer-supported network of PBS member stations serving the state of Louisiana. ... Note: Public Broadcasting Services is a broadcaster in Malta. ... WVLA (NBC 33) is the local NBC affiliate for Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... My Network TV CBS Corporation and Time Warner announced on January 24, 2006 that they will close their respective UPN and WB networks and jointly launch the CW Network in September 2006. ... MyNetworkTV (sometimes written My Network TV, and unofficially abbreviated MyNet, MyTV, MNT, or MNTV) is a television network in the United States, owned by News Corporation. ... WGMB (FOX 44) is the local FOX affiliate for Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... External links Official Website Query the FCCs TV station database for KPBN-LP Categories: | | ... KZUP (Z19) is the local (IND) for Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... External links WBTR Homepage Query the FCCs TV station database for KBTR-CA Categories: | | ... External links Official Website Query the FCCs TV station database for WLFT-CA Categories: | | ... Metro 21 is a local cable government access station in Baton Rouge. ... Cox 4 is a local cable-only station in Baton Rouge and Lafayette, which signed on the air around 2001. ... The Catholic Life Television Network identifies itself as being one of less than ten exclusively Catholic networks. ...


Periodicals

The major daily newspaper is The Advocate, publishing since 1925. Prior to October 1991, Baton Rouge also had an evening newspaper, The State-Times -- at that time, the morning paper was known as "The Morning Advocate." Other publications include: 225, LSU Daily Reveille, Tiger Weekly, Southern University Digest, Greater Baton Rouge Business Report, and the South Baton Rouge Journal. Other newspapers in East Baton Rouge Parish include the Central City News and the Zachary Post. The Advocate is the primary newspaper of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Radio

  • College: KLSU-FM (91.1)
  • Country: WYPY-FM (100.7), WYNK-FM (101.5), WTGE-FM (107.3)
  • Contemporary: WQCK-FM (92.7)
  • Gospel/Christian: WJFM-FM (88.5), WPAE-FM (89.7), KPAE-FM (91.5),WTQT-LP (94.9), WXOK-AM (1460), WPFC-AM (1550)
  • Hits: KRDJ-FM (93.7), WFMF-FM (102.5), WCDV-FM (103.3)
  • Jazz: WBRH-FM (90.3)
  • Oldies: KBRH-AM (1260)
  • Public Radio: WRKF-FM (89.3)
  • Rock: KRVE-FM (96.1), WDGL-FM (98.1), WNXX-FM (104.5), KNXX-FM (104.9), KYRK-FM (104.1)
  • Sports: WSKR-AM (1210), WIBR-AM (1300)
  • Talk: WJBO-AM (1150), WPYR-AM (1380)
  • Urban/Urban Contemporary: WEMX-FM (94.1), KQXL-FM (106.5)
  • Variety: KKAY-AM (1590)

KLSU is a student-run alternative music outlet licensed to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... WYPY (Hot Country 100. ... WYNK-FM is a very dominant Country music outlet licensed to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... WTGE (Country Legends 107. ... WQCK is a Contemporary Christian outlet serving the Baton Rouge area. ... WJFM (Power Praise 88. ... KPAE-FM (91. ... WTQT (Power 94. ... WXOK is a Black Gospel outlet licensed to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... WPFC is a Black Gospel outlet licensed to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... KRDJ (Red @ 93. ... WFMF is a Top 40 outlet licensed to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... WCDV-FM, AKA Sunny 103. ... WBRH is a student-run FM jazz station in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... WRKF is a public radio outlet offering a mix of Classical music and NPR programming. ... KRVE (Lite Rock 96. ... WDGL (Eagle 98. ... KNXX (104. ... KNXX (104. ... KYRK (The New 104. ... WSKR is a Sports Talk outlet serving the Baton Rouge area. ... WIBR is a News/Talk outlet licensed to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... WJBO is a News/Talk outlet licensed to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... WEMX (Max 94. ... KQXL (Q106. ... KKAY is a outlet specializing in variety programming. ...

Education

Primary and secondary schools

Public schools

East Baton Rouge Parish Public Schools, the city's school district, is one of the area's largest school districts. Baton Rouge school district is one of the largest low performing school district in Louisiana. It contains approximately 90 individual schools: 56 elementary schools, 16 middle schools, and 18 high schools. East Baton Rouge Parish Public Schools is the public school district of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, one of the areas largest school districts. ... School districts are a form of special-purpose district in the United States (amongst some other places) which serves to operate the local public primary and secondary schools. ...


Louisiana State University operates the Louisiana State University Laboratory School, a K-12 school. For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... Louisiana State University Laboratory School is a laboratory school under the Louisiana State University College of Education. ...


The state of Louisiana directly operates two special schools for children with disabilities:

The Louisiana School for the Deaf is a school for deaf and hard-of-hearing students in Louisiana located in Baton Rouge. ...

Private Schools

Parkview Baptist School (PBS) is a private, coeducational Christian school located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... University Laboratory High School is a laboratory school under the Louisiana State University College of Education. ... St. ... At The Dunham School, we encourage all students to strive for excellence with academic programs designed to challenge their abilities and nurture their confidence as independent thinkers. ... Redemptorist High School is a private, Roman Catholic high school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Episcopal High School is a private, coeducational day school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Catholic High School is an all-male Catholic college-preparatory school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, run by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart. ... St. ... St. ...

Colleges and Universities

Tiger Stadium at Louisiana State University
Tiger Stadium at Louisiana State University

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 783 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 783 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... For other Southern University campuses, see Southern University System. ... Governors Building Baton Rouge Community College was established on June 28, 1995 as a two year community college. ... Our Lady of the Lake College is an independent Catholic institution, sponsored by the Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady, North American Province. ... Company Name: Louisiana Culinary Institute, LLC. Address: 5837 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70820 Website: www. ... University of Phoenix (UOP) is a for-profit educational institution specializing in adult education, with campuses located throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. ...

Infrastructure

Health and Medicine

Baton Rouge is served by a number of hospitals and clinics: For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... A clinic or outpatient clinic is a small medical facility that provides health care for ambulatory patients - as opposed to inpatients treated in a hospital. ...

HealthSouth Corporation NYSE: HLS, based in Birmingham, Alabama, is one of the nations largest healthcare services provider. ... Zachary is a city located in the Baton Rouge metropolitan area in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... St. ...

Utilities

Electricity services for Baton Rouge are provided by Entergy, and DEMCO. Waste pickup is provided by Allied Waste Services, formally BFI. Entergy Corporation NYSE: ETR is an integrated energy company engaged primarily in electric power productions and retail distribution operations. ...


Transportation

Interstate 10 crossing the Mississippi River
Interstate 10 crossing the Mississippi River

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...

Roads

Baton Rouge is connected by the following major routes: I-10 (Capital City Expressway via the Horace Wilkinson Bridge), I-12 (Republic of West Florida Parkway), I-110 (Martin Luther King Jr. Freeway), Airline Highway (US 61), Florida Boulevard (US 190) (via the Huey P. Long Bridge), Greenwell Springs Road (LA 37), Plank Road/22nd Street (LA 67), Burbank Dr. & Highland Rd.(LA 42), Nicholson Drive (LA 30), Jefferson Highway (LA 73), Louisiana Highway 1 (LA 1) and Scotland/Baker/Zachary Highway (LA 19). The business routes of US 61/190 run west along Florida Blvd. from Airline Hwy. to River Road downtown. The routes also run along River Rd., Chippewa Street and Scenic Highway from Chippewa to Airline. US 190 joins US 61 on Airline Hwy from Florida Blvd. to Scenic Hwy, where the two highways split. US 190 continues westward on Airline to the Huey P. Long Bridge while US 61 heads north on Scenic Highway. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... The Horace Wilkinson Bridge is a cantilever bridge carrying Interstate 10 across the Mississippi River in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Map of Interstate 12 Interstate 12 (abbreviated I-12) is an intrastate interstate highway located entirely within the state of Louisiana, United States. ... Map of East and West Florida in the early 1800s. ... Interstate 110 (abbreviated I-110) is an 8. ... The Dubuque-Wisconsin Bridge, Dubuque, Iowa. ... United States Highway 190 is an east-west United States highway. ... The Huey P. Long Bridge is a truss bridge over the Mississippi River carrying US 190 and 2 rail lines between East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana and West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ...


The street numbering system (which covers the majority of the parish) is centered on the intersection of River Road and North Blvd. adjacent to the Old State Capitol downtown. North Blvd. is the north-south origin line for addresses out to Foster Drive; Florida Blvd. acts as the origin out to the Livingston Parish line. The Mississippi River acts as the east-west address origin line north to approximately Thomas Road, where US 61 (Scenic Highway, Samuels Road) acts as the origin from there northward; and also south to Terrace Street, where Highland Road acts as the origin from there southward. The cities of Baker and Zachary use this system for their east-west streets, but base their origin point for north-south roads at Thomas Road.


Proposed Loop

There were plans of extending I-110 to a northern,southern, and western loop/bypass for the Baton Rouge area. Interstate 110 is an 8. ...


More recently, a circumferential loop freeway has been proposed for the greater Baton Rouge metro area due to increasing congestion on the existing through-town freeways and the lack of a freeway quality bypass. The proposed loop would pass through the outlying parishes of Livingston, Ascension, West Baton Rouge, and Iberville, as well as northern East Baton Rouge Parish.


Airport

The metropolitan area is served by Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport, located in north of Baton Rouge, between Baton Rouge and Baker. Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport (IATA: BTR, ICAO: KBTR) also known as Ryan Field is a public airport located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States. ... Baker is a city in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana as part of the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Area. ...


Proposed Light Rail

Recently, many have proposed extending New Orleans's public transit system by adding light rail routes from downtown along Airline Highway through the airport to Baton Rouge. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Capitol Building Baton Rouge is the capital of Louisiana, a state of the United States of America. ...


There were plans to also create a light rail line, starting in downtown, going down Florida Boulevard, and then ending in Denham Springs, but the idea didn't go over well due to funding and concern of too small a population.


Bus

Public transit is provided by the Capitol Area Transit System.[9] The public transportation system is highly criticized as low performing and not averaging enough riders to continue to be successful in the Baton Rouge area. Area leaders recently took part in an all day ride of the Baton Rouge buses to determine what the problem was and many say the problem is hour long waits for the buses, CATS management say that there are not enough riders to put more buses on the line and won't receive any funding until more people start riding the bus consistently. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Bangkok Skytrain. ...


When there was a massive increase in population immediately following Hurricane Katrina, RTA buses from New Orleans were brought into Baton Rouge to supplement CATS. The LA Swift is a free bus service that runs from Baton Rouge to New Orleans which was created after Hurricane Katrina at a time when Baton Rouge had a large number of displaced residents and it helped displaced residents return to New Orleans to gut their homes, get jobs, leisure, live for good, etc. The funding for the buses were set to cease in late 2006 but was extended until June 2007.


There are plans to create a BRT system. Busways redirects here. ...


Bike

An already completed bike path atop the levee in Baton Rouge could extend all the way to New Orleans, an estimated $33 million project.
It has come under fire for its length and being unnecessary. “But you could travel the whole 110 miles in about six hours at a moderate pace of about 17 miles per hour,” Bruce Wickert (cyclist, heads the local Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee) criticized.


Notable inhabitants, past and present

Sports figures

Seimone Augustus Seimone Augustus (born April 30, 1984 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an American professional basketball player in the WNBA, currently playing for the Minnesota Lynx. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... The Minnesota Lynx are a Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota and play their home games at the Target Center. ... Brandon Bass (Born April 30, 1985) is a professional basketball player in the NBA. He was a second-round draft choice of the New Orleans Hornets in the 2005 NBA Draft. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Dallas Mavericks (also known as the Mavs) are an NBA basketball team based in Dallas, Texas. ... William Abb Billy Cannon (born August 2, 1937) is an All-American and 1959 Heisman Trophy winner from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, and one of the American Football Leagues most celebrated players. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Heisman” redirects here. ... Michael Rashard Clayton (born October 13, 1982 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) was drafted with the 15th selection of the 2004 NFL draft by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as a wide receiver. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... This May 2007 does not cite any references or sources. ... David Michael Dellucci (born October 31, 1973 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an outfielder for the Cleveland Indians in Major League Baseball. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Fightin Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin... Warrick DeMon Dunn (born January 5, 1975 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an American football player who currently plays running back for the Atlanta Falcons of the NFL. // At Catholic High in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Dunn played quarterback, cornerback, and running back. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Atlanta, Georgia Team colors Black, Red, and White Head Coach Bobby Petrino Owner Arthur Blank General manager Rich McKay Mascot Freddie Falcon League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1966–present) Eastern Conference (1966) Western Conference (1967-69) Coastal Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West (1970... Chad Griffin Durbin (born December 3, 1977, in Spring Valley, Illinois) is a pitcher currently with the Detroit Tigers. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... Alan Joseph Faneca, Jr. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Steelers redirects here. ... Randall Blue Jerome Gay, Jr. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... Darryl Quinn Hamilton (born December 3, 1964 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who played for the Milwaukee Brewers (1988, 1990-95), Texas Rangers (1996), San Francisco Giants (1997-98), Colorado Rockies (1998-99) and New York Mets (1999-2001). ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Freddie Lynn Fred Haynes (March 29, 1946 -- November 5, 2006) was, despite his relatively small physical size, a star football player for the Louisiana State University Tigers from 1966-1968, having climaxed his three-season career by successfully quarterbacking both the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans and the Peach Bowl... Lolo Jones (born 5 August 1982) is an American track and field athlete, who specializes in the hurdles. ... Stefan Wayne Lefors (born June 7, 1981) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana is an American football quarterback for the Carolina Panthers. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Charlotte, North Carolina Other nicknames The Cardiac Cats Team colors Black, Carolina Blue, and Silver Head Coach John Fox Owner Jerry Richardson General manager Marty Hurney Mascot Sir Purr League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1995–present) National Football Conference (1995-present) NFC West (1995-2001) NFC South (2002... Travis Minor (born June 30, 1979 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American football player who currently plays running back for the Miami Dolphins. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Jonathan Robert Papelbon (born November 23, 1980 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is the closer for the Boston Red Sox. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Carly Rae Patterson (born February 4, 1988 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) was an American gymnast (the 2004 Olympic All-Around Champion) and is currently an aspiring professional singer. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Andrew Eugene Pettitte (born June 15, 1972 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an American left-handed starting pitcher for the New York Yankees. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Bobby Phills (1969-2000) Bobby Ray Phills II (December 20, 1969-January 12, 2000) was a professional basketball player for the National Basketball Associations Cleveland Cavaliers and Charlotte Hornets (now called the New Orleans Hornets). ... This article is about the sport. ... Ben M. Sheets (born July 18, 1978 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is a Major League Baseball pitcher who currently plays for the Milwaukee Brewers baseball team. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 19, 34, 42, 44 Name Milwaukee Brewers (1970–present) Seattle Pilots (1969) Other nicknames True Blue Brew Crew, The Brew Crew, The Crew, Beermakers Ballpark Miller Park (2001–present) County Stadium (1970–2000) Sick... Marcus Spears is the name of two NFL football players Marcus D. Spears (b. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys Team colors Silver, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Northern Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1966) Capitol Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present... James Charles Taylor (born on September 20, 1935) was a professional football player for ten NFL seasons, from 1958-1967. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is technically the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... Tyrus Wayne Thomas (born August 17, 1986 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an American professional basketball player who played one season of college basketball at LSU and is now an NBA player for the Chicago Bulls. ... NBA redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Reggie Tongue is an american football player currently playing in the NFL for the Oakland Raiders. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Kansas City, Missouri Team colors Red, white and yellow Head Coach Herman Edwards Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt, chairman)[1] General manager Carl Peterson Mascot K.C. Wolf (1989-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League... City Seattle, Washington Team colors Pacific Blue, Navy Blue, Neon Green, White Head Coach Mike Holmgren Owner Paul Allen General manager Tim Ruskell Mascot Blitz, and Taima the hawk League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1976–present) American Football Conference (1977-2001) AFC West (1977-2001) National Football Conference (1976... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Al Davis League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970... Kevin Windham (born February 28, 1978 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is a professional motocross racer. ... A rider using a berm to corner during a motocross race in Australia Motocross (often shortened to MX or MotoX) is a form of motorcycle sport or all-terrain vehicle racing held on enclosed off-road circuits. ... Reggie Torbor (born January 25, 1981 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an American football player who currently plays linebacker for the New York Giants. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ...

Entertainers

This article is about Wesley Brown the football player. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Glory Road is a fantasy novel by Robert A. Heinlein published in 1963. ... Beach Girls is a Television mini series that airs on the television network Lifetime. ... Donna Douglas in June 2007. ... For the 1993 film, see The Beverly Hillbillies (film) The Beverly Hillbillies was an American television program about a hillbilly family transplanted in Southern California. ... John Fred (born John Fred Gourrier, May 8, 1941 – April 14, 2005) was a blue-eyed soul, Cajun swamp pop and bubble-gum pop performer from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, best known for the song Judy in Disguise (With Glasses). His group John Fred and the Playboys were formed in 1956... Dale Houston (April 23, 1940 – September 27, 2007), along with his singing partner, Grace Broussard, rocketed to the top of the Billboard chart with two rock and roll hits -- gold records with more than 1 million copies sold -- Im Leaving It Up to You (No. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... AMERICAN IDOL HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO DEATH OF SIMON ... Chris Thomas King (born October 14, 1964 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an New Orleans Louisiana based blues musician and actor. ... “Blues music” redirects here. ... Torrence Hatch (born November 14, 1983) is an American rapper from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, who raps under the name Lil Boosie is a member of 44th tracklife Bloods. Hatch joined a growing record label called Trill Entertainment which was backed by Pimp C of UGK. Pimp C signed Myca Woods... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Eric Reiley McClendon is an American actor born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana on March 11, 1990. ... John McConnell, also known as John Spud McConnell (born November 13, 1958) is an actor and a radio personality in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Cleo Moore Cleo Moore, was a blonde bombshell of 1950s Hollywood films born October 31 1928 (some sources state 1923) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Tabby Thomas Tabby Thomas (born Ernest Joseph Thomas, January 5, 1929; also known as Rockin Tabby Thomas) is an American blues musician from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... “Blues music” redirects here. ... Pruitt Taylor Vince (born July 5, 1960) is an award-winning American character actor who has made many appearances in film and television. ... A character actor is an actor, especially in motion pictures, who predominantly performs in similar roles throughout the course of a career. ... Webbie (born Webster Gradney on September 6, 1985) is a rapper from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Shane West (born June 10, 1978) is an American television and film actor. ... Lynn Whitfield (May 6, 1953 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an Emmy Award-winning African American actress most famous for portraying African American entertainment pioneer Josephine Baker in 1991. ... Trent Dawson (born February 4, 1971 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an American actor, best known for his role as Henry Coleman on the daytime soap opera As The World Turns. ... As the World Turns (ATWT) is the second longest-running American television soap opera (the first being Guiding Light),[1] airing each weekday on CBS. Set in the fictional town of Oakdale, Illinois, the show debuted on Monday, April 2, 1956[2] at 1:30pm. ... Cameron Richardson (born Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1980) is a US actor. ... ADRIFT is a graphical user interface used to create and play text adventures. ...

Politicians

Jesse Homer Bankston, Sr. ... Earl Kemp Long (26 August 1895 - 5 September 1960) was an American politician and three-time Governor of Louisiana. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Caterpillar Inc. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jack Louis Breaux, Sr. ... Zachary is a city located in the Baton Rouge metropolitan area in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Thomas Overton Brooks (December 21, 1897 - September 16, 1961) was a Democratic representative from Louisiana 1937-1961, chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Science and Astronautics. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shreveport, Louisiana is the third largest metropolitan city in the state of Louisiana, USA. It is located in Caddo Parish, and as of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 200,145. ... James Harvey Jim Brown, Jr. ... Theodore F. Theo Cangelosi (December 14, 1911 - July 14, 1992) was a Baton Rouge attorney, banker, businessman, a former Democratic member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, and a confidant of Governors Earl Kemp Long and John J. McKeithen. ... Carl Norman Crane (born October 28, 1939) is the term-limited Republican chairman of the Education Committee of the Louisiana House of Representatives. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jeffrey Lane Fortenberry, born December 27, 1960 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana is a Republican U.S. Representative from the first Congressional district of Nebraska (seemap]). He was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 2004, succeeding the more moderate Doug Bereuter, who resigned. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... Edward Clark Gaudin (born December 26, 1931) is a Baton Rouge attorney who served for 21 years in the Louisiana House of Representatives (1967-1968; 1972-1992) as the first Republican member from East Baton Rouge Parish in the twentieth century. ... East Baton Rouge Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ... Melvin L. Kip Holden (born August 12, 1952) is the Democratic Mayor-President of East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... East Baton Rouge Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ... Louis Elwood Woody Jenkins (born January 3, 1947) is a former broadcasting executive in Baton Rouge who was a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives from 1972-2000. ... Donald Ray Kennard (born August 11, 1937) is a Louisianan politican who has represented part of East Baton Rouge Parish in the Louisiana House of Representatives since 1976. ... Elmer B. Litchfield (born 1927) is the former 23-year sheriff of East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Francis Charles Chuck McMains, Jr. ... William Henson Moore, III, the president and CEO of the American Forest & Paper Association since 1995, was only the second Republican to represent Louisiana in the U.S. House of Representative since Reconstruction. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Robert Fred Bob Odom (born 1935) is a Democratic politician, a resident of Zachary in East Baton Rouge Parish, and the departing Democratic Commissioner of Agriculture and Forestry in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Daniel Wesley Dan Richey (born October 31, 1948) is a Baton Rouge-based political consultant for pro-family candidates and organizations, including Louisiana Family Forum[2]. In 2004, he directed the grassroots organization for the successful campaign to elect U.S. Representative David Vitter as the first Republican U.S... Charles Elson Buddy Roemer, III, was governor of Louisiana from 1988 to 1992 and a Democratic member of the U.S. House from 1981-1988. ... Tony Perkins is weatherman on ABCS Good Morning America. ... The Family Research Council (FRC) is a Christian conservative non-profit lobbying organization, formed in the United States by James Dobson in 1981 and incorporated 1983. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850)[2] was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ... The Military of the United States, also known as the United States Armed Forces, is structured into five branches consisting of the: United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Navy United States Air Force United States Coast Guard Reserves United States National Guard United States Army Reserve United... Sandra Smith Sandy Thompson (born ca. ... The Atchafalaya River is a distributary of the Mississippi and Red rivers, approximately 170 mi (270 km) long, in south central Louisiana in the United States. ... David C. Treen David Conner Treen, Sr. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...

Military commanders

General Robert H. Barrow, 27th Commandant of the Marine Corps General Robert Hilliard Barrow (born February 5, 1922) was the 27th Commandant of the United States Marine Corps (USMC) from 1979-1983. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune, 13th Commandant of the Marine Corps, was born at Pointe Coupee, Louisiana, on 10 January 1867. ... The UKs Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft A marine corps (from French corps de marine) is a branch of a nations armed forces incorporating Marines, intended to be capable of mounting amphibious assaults using infantry, armour, aircraft, and watercraft. ...

Intellectuals

Edward Joseph Ed Cullen, III (born August 25, 1946), is a features writer for the Baton Rouge Morning Advocate and a frequent contributor to All Things Considered on National Public Radio. ... The Advocate is the primary newspaper of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... Margaret Richardson Dixon (1908-June 22, 1970) was perhaps the most influential woman journalist of 20th Century Louisiana. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Patrick Mike Dunne (June 21, 1949 - July 8, 2007) was an award-winning newspaper reporter, author, and professor in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, who later specialized in conservation issues. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... N. Stephan Kinsella Norman (N.) Stephan Kinsella (born 1965) is an American intellectual property lawyer and libertarian legal theorist. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Libertarian theories of law build on libertarianism or classical liberalism. ... Lars Kestner is an American author of financial texts from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... John Maurice LaPlante, Jr. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Eugene Wigner Eugene Paul Wigner (Hungarian Wigner Pál Jenő) (November 17, 1902 – January 1, 1995) was a Hungarian physicist and mathematician who received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963 for his contributions to the theory of the atomic nucleus and the elementary particles, particularly through the discovery and... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... LIGO stands for Lesser Inner Greater Outer. ...

Sister cities

After a visit to the Republic of China (Taiwan), Mayor-President Kip Holden unveiled plans to pursue a sister city agreement with a second Taiwanese city, Taipei. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Aix (prounounced eks), or, to distinguish it from other cities built over hot springs, Aix-en-Provence is a city in southern France, some 30 km north of Marseille. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Taichung (Chinese: ; pinyin: Táizhōng; Wade-Giles: Tai-chung; POJ: Tâi-tiong) is a city located in west-central Taiwan with a population of just over one million people, making it the third largest city on the island, after Taipei and Kaohsiung. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Haiti. ... Categories: Caribbean geography stubs | Capitals in North America | Haiti ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... Melvin L. Kip Holden (born August 12, 1952) is the Democratic Mayor-President of East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Xinyi District (信義區) Government  - Mayor Hau Lung-bin (KMT)1 E9 Area  - City 271. ...


See also

The Baton Rouge Metropolitan Area, centered in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is inhabited by about 700,000 people. ...

References

  1. ^ Top 25 Water Ports by Weight: 2004 (Million short tons). Freight Facts and Figures 2006. Federal Highway Administration (November 2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  2. ^ Steuckrath, Prof. George."Historical Collections of Louisiana—Baton Rouge." Debow's review, Agricultural, commercial, industrial progress and resources. New Orleans (etc.): J.D.B. DeBow,(April, 1859) pp. 439-444 from Making of America Journal Articles
  3. ^ Life on the Mississippi Page 416-17from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  4. ^ Life on the Mississippi Page 416 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  5. ^ 2005 Murder Rate in Cities (2005). Retrieved on 2007-01-22.
  6. ^ Baton Rouge Crime Statistics for 2005 (2006). Retrieved on 2007-01-22.
  7. ^ Baton Rouge Crime Statistics for 2006 (2007). Retrieved on 2007-01-22.
  8. ^ General Growth Properties (2006). Retrieved on 2006-08-23.
  9. ^ Capitol Area Transit System

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  • Official Baton Rouge Government Web Site
  • Baton Rouge Retrospective: history in photographs and postcards

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Authorities

  • Baton Rouge Police Department
  • Louisiana State Police
  • Baton Rouge Guide

News sources

Coordinates: 30.45809° N 91.140229° W The Advocate is the primary newspaper of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... WAFB is the CBS-affiliated television station in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... WVLA (NBC 33) is the local NBC affiliate for Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... WGMB (FOX 44) is the local FOX affiliate for Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6028 words)
Baton Rouge is the parish seat of East Baton Rouge Parish.
Planters in the Baton Rouge area were unusually prosperous, thanks both to the fertile soil and to the brisk illegal trade with neighboring Spanish Louisiana, and the fort became the center of an expanding agricultural community, though the town had not yet evolved.
In 1825, Baton Rouge was visited by the Marquis de Lafayette as part of his triumphal tour of the United States, and he was the guest of honor at a town ball and banquet.
Baton Rouge, Louisiana (547 words)
Baton Rouge is the capital of Louisiana, a state of the United States of America.
Baton Rouge is served by Baton Rouge Metropolitian Airport.
After the United States purchase of Louisiana it grew more rapidly, and was incorporated as a city in 1817, at which time it was the second largest town in Louisiana.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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