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Encyclopedia > Batley

Coordinates: 53.717° N -1.6351° E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Batley
Statistics
Population: 43,000
Location
OS grid reference: SE238238
Latitude: 53.717°
Longitude: -1.6351°
Administration
District: Kirklees
Metropolitan county: West Yorkshire
Region: Yorkshire and the Humber
Constituent country: England
Sovereign state: United Kingdom
Other
Ceremonial county: West Yorkshire
Historic county: Yorkshire
Services
Police force: West Yorkshire Police
Fire and rescue: West Yorkshire
Ambulance: Yorkshire
Post office and telephone
Post town: BATLEY
Postal district: WF17
Dialling code: 01924
Politics
UK Parliament: Batley and Spen
European Parliament: Yorkshire and the Humber

Batley is a small town in Kirklees Metropolitan Borough, in the county of West Yorkshire, England. It lies north of Dewsbury, just off the M62. After undergoing a period of major growth in the 19th century due to the success of the shoddy trade, Batley has more recently undergone a period of decline. Batley is part of a special EU transformation zone. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... Latitude, usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ... Longitude, sometimes denoted by the Greek letter λ (lambda),[1][2] describes the location of a place on Earth east or west of a north-south line called the Prime Meridian. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase sometimes used, usually by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia (example here) and European institutions such as the Council of Europe... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... West Yorkshire Police is the police force covering West Yorkshire in the United Kingdom. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service is the county-wide, statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the Metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England. ... Crest of NHS ambulance services in England Crest of the Scottish Ambulance Service In the UK, the majority of ambulance services are provided under the National Health Service through local ambulance trusts. Each trust is specific to a county or area, and so the country is divided across a number... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Batley and Spen is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... 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... Yorkshire and the Humber is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England_(bordered). ... ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Statistics Population: 54,341 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SE245225 Administration District: Kirklees Metropolitan county: West Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: West Yorkshire Historic county: Yorkshire Services Police force: West Yorkshire Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: Yorkshire... M62 refers to: Messier 62, a Messier object and a globular cluster in the Ophiuchus constellation. ... This article is about wool, the fiber. ...

Contents

History

Little is known of Batley in Saxon times. The name Batley is derived from Danish, meaning either valley or homestead of bats, or more likely, homestead of the locally prominent Batte family. It is recorded in the Domesday Book as 'Bateleia'. After the Norman conquest, the manor was granted to Ilbert de Lacy. It subsequently passed into the ownership of the de Batleys, and by the 12th century had passed by marriage to the Copley family. Their residence at Batley Hall was held directly from the Crown; at this time the district fell within the Duchy of Lancaster. [1] The population at this time was 30 to 40 people. By the late 14th century, the population has increased to around 100. The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Suborders Megachiroptera Microchiroptera See text for families. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... crest of de Lacy Lacy´s purple lion De Lacy (Lascy, Lacie) is an old Norman noble family originating from Lassy (Calvados). ... Throughout the Commonwealth Realms The Crown is an abstract concept which represents the legal authority for the existence of any government. ... A not-so-nice duchy. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ...


There has been a church in Batley since the 11th century. The present Batley Parish Church was built in the reign of Henry VI (1422-1461), and parts of the original remain. Although Batley is an ancient settlement, this is all that remains of any great antiquity. Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ...


Howley Hall at Soothill was built in the 1580s by Sir John Savile, a member of the great Yorkshire landowners, the Savile family. The house was besieged during the Civil War in 1643 prior to the Battle of Adwalton Moor but appears to have sustained no serious damage at the time. It continued to be occupied during the 17th century but fell into disrepair. Howley Hall was finally demolished in 1730. However, many ruins still exist including the cellars of the great hall. The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... The Battle of Adwalton Moor was a battle in the English Civil War on 30 June 1643. ...


Batley Grammar School was founded in 1612 by the Rev. William Lee and is still in existence today. Batley Grammar School is a co-educational public school located at Carlinghow Hill in Upper Batley, West Yorkshire, UK. The school was founded in 1612. ... Events January 20 - Mathias becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ...


Methodism came to Batley in the 1740s and took a strong hold in the town which continued into the 20th century. John Nelson from neighbouring Birstall was a leading lay preacher in the early Methodist movement. Areas of the town, such as Mount Pleasant, were noted for their absence of public houses due to the Methodist leaning of the local population. For the Methodist school of ancient Greek medicine, see Methodism (history of medicine) Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... John Nelson (1794 - 1860) was a U.S. lawyer. ... Birstall is suburb of Batley, roughly 6 miles south-west of Leeds in West Yorkshire, England. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


In the late 18th century the main occupations in the town were farming and weaving. The Industrial Revolution came to Batley in 1796 with the arrival of the first water powered mills for carding spinning. Over the next half century the population grew rapidly, from around 2,500 at the turn of the 19th century to 9,308 at the 1851 census. The parish of Batley at this point included Morley, Churwell and Gildersome, with a total population of 17,359. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn made of fiber called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... A Watt steam engine. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Morleys Coat of Arms Morley is a town in the county of Yorkshire (since 1974, West Yorkshire), England, in the Metropolitan Borough of Leeds and is situated five miles south-west of Leeds City Centre. ... Gildersome is a village in the Leeds Metropolitan District. ...


A toll road built in 1832 between Gomersal and Dewsbury included a branch to Batley (the present day Branch Road) which allowed for "the growing volumes of wool, cloth and coal" to be transported. Previously there had only been foot and cart tracks. Around the same time there were strikes in the mills, which led to an influx of Irish workers who settled permanently in Batley. Initially this led to some antagonism from the locals, due to the cheaper wages demanded by the Irish workers and general anti-Roman Catholic sentiment, but this faded in time. By 1853 Catholic services were being held regularly in the town, although the first Roman Catholic church, St Mary of the Angels, was not built until 1870. A toll road, tollway, turnpike, pike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a toll (i. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Gomersal is a town in the county of West Yorkshire, England, part of Cleckheaton, near Bradford and the River Spen. ... Statistics Population: 54,341 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SE245225 Administration District: Kirklees Metropolitan county: West Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: West Yorkshire Historic county: Yorkshire Services Police force: West Yorkshire Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: Yorkshire... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


By 1848 there was a railway station in Batley, and in 1853 Batley Town Hall was erected. It was enlarged in 1905, and is in the Neoclassical style style, with a corbelled parapet and pilasters rising to a centre pediment. In 1868 Batley was incorporated as a municipal borough, the former urban district of Birstall being added to it in 1937.[2] Batley railway station serves the town of Batley, West Yorkshire. ... City Hall is a 1996 film directed by Harold Becker. ... The neoclassical movement that produced Neoclassical architecture began in the mid-18th century, both as a reaction against the Rococo style of anti-tectonic naturalistic ornament, and an outgrowth of some classicizing features of Late Baroque. ... A parapet consists of a dwarf wall along the edge of a roof, or round a lead flat, terrace walk, etc. ... In architecture, pilasters comprise slightly-projecting pseudo-columns built into or onto a wall, with capitals and bases. ... A pediment is a classical architectural element consisting of a triangular section or gable found above the horizontal superstructure (entablature) which lies immediately upon the columns. ... // General information Birstall is a large village, north of Leicester, within the Leicestershire county, in the East Midlands or England. ...

Batley Town Hall, built in 1853 and enlarged in 1905
Batley Town Hall, built in 1853 and enlarged in 1905

1853 also saw the establishment of a small confectionery shop by Michael Spedding. His business would expand, moving to larger premises in 1927 and later becoming Fox's Biscuits. Today, along with Tesco, it is one of the two largest employers in the town. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1356x808, 270 KB) Summary Batley Town Hall 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1356x808, 270 KB) Summary Batley Town Hall 2006. ... A confection selection The term confectionery refers to food items that are (or at least are perceived to be) rich in sugar. ... Tesco plc is a UK based international grocery and general merchandising retail chain. ...


In the late 19th century, Batley was the centre of the "shoddy trade" in which wool rags and clothes were recycled by reweaving them into blankets, carpets, uniforms. In 1861 there were at least 30 shoddy mills in Batley. The owners of the recycling businesses were known as the "shoddy barons" . There was a "shoddy king" and a "shoddy temple", properly known as the Zion Chapel. This imposing building in the town centre was opened in 1870, and reflected the popularity of the Methodist movement in Batley. The library was built in 1907 with funds donated by the philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. The library has recently been modernised, with a new microfilm viewer, and reels of the Batley News dating back over 120 years. There was also an active coal mining industry in Batley at this time. The first records of coal mining in Batley date back to the 16th century at White Lee; the last pit in the town closed in 1973. This article is about wool, the fiber. ... Long and short hair wool at the South Central Family Farm Research Center in Boonesville, Arizona Wool is the fibre derived from the fur of animals of the Caprinae family, principally sheep, but the hair of certain species of other mammals such as goats, alpacas and rabbits may also be... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... Someone who practices Philanthropy. ... Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American businessman, a major and widely respected philanthropist, and the founder of the Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


From the end of the 1950s onwards, the need for cheap labour in the town's textile industries drew in migrant labourers from the Gujarat, the Punjab and parts of modern day Pakistan, mostly of Muslim origins. There are now successful and well-integrated communities that contribute to the economic and social life of the town. There is a growing community infrastructure that includes around six purpose-built mosques and a number of specialist shops and businesses catering for the culturally specific needs of local Asian people, who currently account for approximately 23% of the combined population of Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw. This article is for the Indian state. ... Look up Punjab in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Turkish: Müslüman, Persian and Urdu: مسلمان, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of Islam. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Birkenshaw is a village to the East of Glasgow, and in close proximity to Uddingston and Viewpark. ...


In 1974 responsibility for local government passed to Kirklees Metropolitan Council, with its headquarters in Huddersfield 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... ... Statistics Population: 146,234 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SE145165 Administration Metropolitan borough: Kirklees Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: West Yorkshire Historic county: Yorkshire (West Riding) Services Police force: West Yorkshire Fire and rescue: West Yorkshire Ambulance: Yorkshire Post office...


Sport and culture

The town is home to the professional rugby league club Batley Bulldogs. Rugby league is a team sport played by two teams of 17 players, with 13 on the field at any one time and 4 on the bench (reserves). ... Batley Bulldogs Batley Bulldogs are one of the oldest clubs still in existence, they were formed way back in 1880 as a result of various local sports clubs joining forces. ...


Wilton Park (known locally as Batley Park) is a large park between Batley town centre and Upper Batley. In its grounds are a butterfly house, the Milner K. Ford Observatory (built in 1966 and home to the Batley Astronomical Society) and Bagshaw Museum. The museum is located in a house built by one of the original "shoddy barons", George Sheard, and features local history, natural history, curios from around the world, and a Ancient Egypt exhibition. The museum (originally the Wilton Park Museum) is named after its first curator Walter Bagshaw, a Batley councillor and extensive traveller. An Australian park A park is any of a number of geographic features. ... Families Superfamily Hesperioidea: Hesperiidae Superfamily Papilionoidea: Papilionidae Pieridae Nymphalidae Lycaenidae Riodinidae A butterfly is an insect of the order Lepidoptera, it belongs to either the Hesperioidea (the skippers) or Papilionoidea (all other butterflies) Superfamilies. ... MolÄ—tai Astronomical Observatory An observatory is a location used for observing terrestrial and/or celestial events. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now usually viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines. ... Main article: Ancient Egypt The history of ancient Egypt began around 3100 BCE when Egypt became a unified Egyptian state, but archaeological evidence indicates that a developed society had formed much earlier. ... A curator of a cultural heritage institution (e. ...

Bagshaw Museum, with its distinctive copper tower, was originally the home of the Sheard family
Bagshaw Museum, with its distinctive copper tower, was originally the home of the Sheard family

Batley also hosts the Yorkshire Motor Museum, with a small but varied collection of cars dating back to 1885, and reflecting local car makers as well as the more famous marques. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1585 KB) Summary Bagshaw Museum, Wilton Park, Batley. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1585 KB) Summary Bagshaw Museum, Wilton Park, Batley. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Batley Art Gallery, located in the impressive Batley Library building, features contemporary art, craft and photography. The cosmopolitan "Redbrick Mill" shopping development is also just outside the town centre. This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... A craft is a skill, especially involving practical arts. ... HAHA, Ive deleted all KISS MY ASS>< ...


Between 1966 and 1977 the Batley Variety Club was frequented by many high profile acts including Johnny Mathis, Eartha Kitt, The Bee Gees, Roy Orbison, The Hollies and Cliff Richard, among others. It is now the Frontier nightclub, and has been since the late 1970s. However there are many rumours at present that the Frontier is set to change back to the Batley Variety Club name and style. The Frontier was actually sold to a group of local businessmen in April 2005.While they are bringing back more variety putting on more live shows, the venue remains as the Frontier. John Royce Mathis (born September 30, 1935), known popularly as Johnny Mathis, is an American popular music singer. ... Eartha Kitt (who was born Eartha Mae Keith, January 17, 1927)[1] is an American actress, singer, and cabaret star. ... The Bee Gees: Maurice, Barry and Robin The Bee Gees were a British and Australian band, originally a pop singer-songwriter combination, reborn as funk and disco. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential American singer-songwriter and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... The Hollies The Hollies are a British rock and roll band formed in the early 1960s. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


Professional snooker player Paul Hunter lived in Batley until his death on the 9th October 2006. Snooker is a cue sport that is played on a large (12 feet × 6 feet, 3. ... Wikinews has news related to: Snooker player Paul Hunter dies of cancer, age 27 Paul Alan Hunter (14 October 1978 – 9 October 2006) was an English professional snooker player. ...


In cricket, Batley has several local teams, and is also part of the cricket association for the Heavy Woollen District. The original definition of the latter area was to within a six mile radius of Batley Town Hall. The Heavy Woollen Cup can now be entered by any team within eighteen miles of Batley, but there is an upper limit of sixty-four teams. For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ... A woollen mill in Dewsbury, now converted to flats but retaining as a feature the mill name. ...


Natives

Batley Grammar School was attended by Sir Titus Salt, an industrialist who founded the model village of Saltaire, and by Joseph Priestley, a friend of Benjamin Franklin, Josiah Wedgwood. Batley Grammar School is a co-educational public school located at Carlinghow Hill in Upper Batley, West Yorkshire, UK. The school was founded in 1612. ... Sir Titus Salt (20 September 1803 - 29 December 1876), born in Morley, was a manufacturer and benefactor in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. ... Saltaire is the name of a Victorian era model village in the metropolitan borough of Bradford, West Yorkshire, England, by the River Aire and the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. ... Joseph Frederick Priestley is often credited for the discovery of oxygen. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Josiah Wedgwood Josiah Wedgwood (July 12, 1730 – January 3, 1795) was an English potter, credited with the industrialization of the manufacture of pottery. ...


Pop singer Robert Palmer was also born in Batley. For popular music (music produced commercially rather than art or folk music), see Popular music. ... The Riptide album was Palmers best selling work. ...


Influential Oxford chemist John Bernard Roberts also hails from Batley. In 2004 a small plaque was erected on Upper Batley Low Lane to commemorate his pioneering work in the field of inorganic chemistry. There were calls in 2005 to remove this honour after allegations emerged that he embezzled large amounts of money from Batley's EU development grant. Although these claims were never proven, many locals link the allegations to the chemist's increasingly hedonistic lifestyle.


External links

  1. Portal for general information about Batley
  2. Maggie Blanck's family history site, includes a history of Batley and good source material
  3. Batley & Dewsbury Towns' Management Association
  4. Visitors to Dewsbury

  Results from FactBites:
 
GENUKI: Batley (552 words)
"BATLEY, a parish-town, in Agbrigg division of Agbrigg and Morley, liberty of Pontefract; 2½, miles from Dewsbury, 6¼ from Bradford, 8 S. of Leeds, 31 from York.
Batley, the field of Batt or Batta is a place of great antiquity.
The church was granted to the Canons of St. Oswald of Nostal, and confirmed by Henry I. Not a vestige of the original structure remains, the whole having been rebuilt about the time of Henry VI.
Batley (6783 words)
In 1868 Batley was a parish and a township in the West Riding of Yorkshire.
The population of the township of Batley was given as 14,173 in 1861.
"Batley is a town, a township and a sub-district in the district of Dewsbury, and a parish in the district of Dewsbury in Yorkshire..............
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